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Janelle Simone Professionals in the Industry 16 hours ago / Scarborough, Ontario

Quite the turnaround for Square. It's definitely a good move. Wish more businesses would take this initiative. https://www.forbes.com/sites/tomangell/2019/05/22/square-quietly-launches-program-for-cbd-cannabis-company-credit-card-processing/#50827b562329

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Square Quietly Launches Program For CBD Cannabis Company Credit Card Processing

Forbes

Companies that sell cannabis products-even those consisting of CBD derived from hemp, which was legalized in the U.S. through the Farm Bill late last year-are continuing to have trouble accessing basic financial services that are available to businesses in other sectors. That includes being able to maintain bank accounts and process their customers' credit cards.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/tomangell/2019/05/22/squar...

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JADEO Medical Cannabis 17 hours ago / Toronto, Ontario


Medical Cannabis: Where Do You Start?

The thought of obtaining a medical cannabis prescription may seem daunting, but it's actually not as complicated as you may think. Watch now, as we walk you through the simple process.

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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

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Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo

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  • From BahaqueenM

    wow, I've thought about medical marijuana before for a condition i experience never really thought the process was this simple. Will def look into this.

Brianne Campbell Education, Training and Events 1 day ago / TORONTO, Ontario

Here at Collision! Akon says if you want to open a cannabis business in Africa, “all you need is a plane ticket and a plan”. He went on to discuss the amount of red tape involved in running a business in North America.

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Soulmaz Leonora News, Finance and The Law 1 day ago / Toronto, Ontario

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/pot-shop-closes-doors-ottawa-1.5139239

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Pot shop cuts hours because it can't get enough cannabis | CBC News

CBC

An Ottawa pot shop is being forced to significantly reduce its hours because it's consistently running out of cannabis and says the province won't allow it to increase its order. The Hobo Recreational Cannabis Store on Bank Street, which was operating seven days a week for 14 hours a day, will now close early on Tuesdays and entirely on Wednesdays.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/pot-shop-closes-d...

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Janelle Simone Professionals in the Industry 1 day ago / Scarborough, Ontario

I'm at Collision Conference for the next few days. Definitely looking forward to some of the sessions on cannabis. Anybody else attending?

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JADEO Consumption & Accessories 5 days ago / Toronto, Ontario


Q&A With The Red Seal Chef Behind Vancouver's Savoury Stoner

Last week, JADEO’s own Brianne Campbell had the opportunity to sit down with Red Seal Chef Mike Quigley to talk about his newest venture: cannabis-infused fine dining.

Why did you decide to become a chef?

Cooking has always felt natural to me. Dishwashing was my very first job. I loved it. And who loves washing dishes?! I learned so much about food in that first summer on the shores of Lake Muskoka. And so much about “the life of the cook”. Chef Joe wasn’t a sterling example of the human existence, but he was happy. Happy to be creating in a way that he wanted to create. I loved his passion. I could see why he chose to do what he did. The seed was planted all those summers ago. And this was also my first experience with cannabis. I didn’t try at this time, but my coworkers helped to normalize cannabis for me, show me that people I knew and liked smoked.

I spent years and years from that point working in various restaurants. If I took a job that wasn’t in food service, it didn’t last long before I was running back to the pans. I love cooking. I love the cook’s life. It was only natural for me that, upon completion of high school, it was time to go to chef’s school.

We know that you were already a well sought-after private chef - what inspired you to start infusing cannabis in your dishes?

As far as cannabis infusion goes, I loved cannabis from the first time I tried it. I wasn’t one of the “first time did nothing to me” people. I had quite The euphoric experience and very much enjoyed it. Since then, I have been a heavy smoker of cannabis.

Cannabis knowledge has changed so quickly. Cannabis acceptance has also changed quite rapidly. I have always been a person who advocates for the use of cannabis. I love it so much, why wouldn’t everyone?! It came to my attention in the last several years that a lot of people really didn’t like the idea of smoking. Nothing to do with the cannabis necessarily. But with the actual act of smoking and what it would do their bodies. It is well known that a large percentage of the Canadian populace has said they would try edibles. A light went off in my head! People would probably enjoy pesto pasta with weed in it a lot better than weed brownies! Earthy, floral cannabis pairs a lot better with basil and garlic than it does with sugar and chocolate. So I started experimenting. Putting cannabis flowers inside ravioli. Using cannabis olive oil to finish dishes. Using cannabis coconut oil to start a curry.

When I moved to B.C. in 2007, strain knowledge and attributes were only for the “nerdy stoners”, but I started to take notice. If someone says that “tangerine dream” has citrus notes in the smell as well as the flavour of the smoke, wouldn’t the same be true of the flavour when ingested? Wouldn’t it work well on a salad?!

It turns out all those tasting notes did, in fact, have some validity in the actual flavour. So my experiments deepened.

A lot of what I do works in fresh flower and is for the flavour. The buzz is just secondary and a nice touch! At this time, I’ve only been able to experiment and use flower, juice and infused oils/butters. I haven’t been able to get my hands on any pure extracts. I have experimented with smoking items but am trying to take that one step further. Most “cannabis smoking” is done with dried flowers and not in your typical American BBQ smoke fashion, which is what I am aiming for. I am trying to use the stalks of large cannabis plants to actually properly smoke items for long periods of time, rather than just wrapping items and blowing dried cannabis flower smoke over them.

Photo: The Savoury Stoner

Wow - that does sound delicious! So, what does a typical private dinner experience look like with The Savoury Stoner?

A typical private dinner experience with The Savoury Stoner is that which you choose! I’ve had nervous first timers that were quiet and needed lots of explanation, soft music and reassurance. I can be there to “hold ones hand” if necessary. On the other end of the spectrum, I’ve done parties of 20 with raucous individuals that couldn’t possibly have enough THC infused into their foods! They drink, listen to loud music and generally just party!

For myself, having experience as a private chef helps me to guide the service in the right direction. I have a list of questions I ask interested parties that helps me to identify their style and what they’re looking for out of their cannabis-infused dinner experience. Infusion can go many ways. I have many strains and can use CBD flower and oil to leave out the euphoria and just have an infused experience that leaves the diner feeling elated, fully nourishing their endocannabinoid system.

So you really are able to customize dinners to suit anyone’s style! What is your favourite cuisine to infuse?

My favourite cuisine to infuse is my favourite cuisine to cook: Italian. Like so many cuisines in the world, there is a ton of variety in Italian cooking, which affords nearly limitless possibilities with infusion. Olive oil is one of the best delivery methods of ingested THC. The finishing olive oil I have is absolutely delicious! It’s light, floral and slightly earthy. It pairs so well with fresh southern Italian foods. And compliments the flavour of tomato sauce wonderfully. The best use of cannabis olive oil has to be in pesto. The flavours just cry out for each other!

Photo: The Savoury Stoner

I LOVE pesto and I know that fresh ingredients are super important in a flavourful pesto. Where do you source your ingredients from?

As with all cooking now, I try and source as close to home as I can. The bounty of the lower mainland in the summer as well as the Pemberton Valley, Squamish Valley, and the Okanagan all have so much to offer. I source my cannabis from LP’s and my oils from a professional production facility in Squamish. I ensure my guests’ safety by acquiring my cannabis from approved sources. You absolutely will not find homemade butters or oils in any of my recipes. I can control the dosage much more easily if I actually know what’s in the product and am not just guessing or assuming I’ve got it correct myself.

What has been the most popular cannabis-infused dish you have prepared?

The hands down, most popular dish I have infused is “cannapesto tagliatelle”. As I have mentioned above, cannabis olive oil tastes amazing when added to basil pesto. The earthy, floral notes of the cannabis oil I use compliments the natural flavours and aromas of basil and garlic. The fat from the nuts in the pesto helps as a delivery method for the THC. I use mushrooms, pea shoots and cannabis indica flowers in this dish. And plus, who doesn’t love pasta?!

Definitely, have to try that! What would you recommend to someone who might be new to cannabis?

If you are new to cannabis or haven’t had many cannabis-infused experiences, I recommend a 5-10 mg THC dose the same as our federal government does. This way, you should be able to feel it, but very much still retain your cognitive functions and ability to carry on a conversation. There is an old adage in cooking: you can always add more, but you can’t take away. I can always increase dosage for individuals if they feel they wanted a more intense euphoric experience.

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  • From 22

    Need to hire him next time he in Toronto area...

    • From Brianne Campbell

      Right! He’ll be in Toronto for a bit this summer!

JADEO Medical Cannabis 6 days ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} How Do I Get A Prescription For Medical Cannabis?

Curious about how to get a medical prescription for cannabis? Watch now as Dr. Peter Blecher, Chief Medical Officer, Starseed Medicinal Inc. explains.

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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

-

Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo


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  • From 22

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

JADEO Women's Health 1 week ago / Toronto, Ontario


Women In Cannabis Wednesday: Edition 11 - Maggie Tamo

The cannabis industry is filled with many unique and inspirational stories, and Maggie's journey is exactly that. This week for "Women in Cannabis Wednesday" we chat with Maggie Tamo about how an unexpected medical diagnosis and a desire to help others, turned this career driven mom into a budding cannapreneur, launching her own brand Club Four20.

How did you get your start in the cannabis industry?

I was diagnosed with Brain Cancer in November 2011 and then Thyroid Cancer in July 2012. I followed the lead from my medical team with the traditional treatment of surgery; awake craniotomy for my brain (removed 95% of my brain cancer), complete thyroidectomy and removal of 80 lymph nodes. Alongside the surgery, we treated the brain cancer with Chemotherapy and radioactive Iodine treatment for my thyroid cancer. These treatments were over a course of 2.5 years. When my health and cancer was stable I went back to work. It was 2.5 years later when the remaining 5% of Brain Cancer started to grow back. The Doctor’s gave me the option to start Chemotherapy right away to treat it or we can wait 3 months and do another scan to measure the growth. I thought this would be an excellent time to try a more holistic natural approach to treat my cancer. There was a lot of talk surrounding Cannabis and Cancer and I wanted to give it a try. I started experimenting with vaping and ingestion of Cannabis with varying levels and THC and CBD…and when I went back for my 3 month Brain MRI it had stopped progressing. I continue with cannabis to this day and my cancer has been stable for several years. The world of cannabis was a lot more complicated than what I remembered it to be. There were several ways to consume cannabis and the 3 most popular ways were vaping, smoking and infusing it. I put together 3 everything you need kits in these areas that consist of high-quality products that were easy to use…. and that is how Club Four20 was formed.

Did your diagnosis change the way you viewed cannabis?

My diagnosis did change the way I viewed Cannabis, as I had always viewed it as a recreational drug and never for its medicinal attributes. The more research I conducted, the more I realized all of the medicinal properties and benefits it had to offer. I would classify it as a wonder drug that touches on so many illnesses; from treating migraines, slowing tumor growth, to preventing seizures, aiding with anxiety, and the list goes on and on. I now see it as a way for people to treat chronic illness or symptoms of it in a natural, non-synthetic way.

How are you hoping to impact others with your brand?

It was through my experience that Club Four20 was founded. The fundamental goal to help people through education and simplification. We define the 3 realms of smoking, vaping and infusion. We customize the kits to include everything you need to fulfill the experience and we simplify it by placing them in a beautiful package and shipping it directly to your door.

Based on your experiences what do you love most about working in the cannabis industry?

The thing I love the most about working in the cannabis industry is that it is unchartered territory. That you deal with a spectrum of people from experienced users, recreational users, medicinal users to first-timers. Everyone has an interesting story and perspective.

How do you personally feel women influence the industry?

I feel that women bring a new perspective to the industry by adding a more stylish spin to cannabis. I feel that women are just as likely to vape as they are to sip a nice merlot. I also feel that there is more of a creative influence that comes from a woman’s taste and standards.

You're a mom, do you feel like mothers in particular face a double standard when it comes to cannabis use?

I feel that there can be a double standard, as everything is with mothers, however as it becomes more mainstream and more acceptable, it is starting to fade. Since starting Club Four20 and having conversations about cannabis I’m finding more and more people are accepting of it and pretty soon vaping after putting the kids down will be just as common as having a glass or two of wine.

Do you have any advice for mothers who use cannabis?

First and foremost is to be responsible. As a single mother, I completely understand the pressures that come with having a career and raising a child. We all have good days and bad days and I find cannabis to be a healthier alternative to relax and unwind at the end of a long day. Find out what works for you and don’t let other people’s judgment or opinions influence you. Only you know what is good and what works for you in making you feel better.

How does cannabis play a role in your self-care routine?

I utilize cannabis medicinally and recreationally. I have my own routine that I follow. For my cancer management, I take CBD oil during the day so I can function as a mom and with my career. At night time I take high concentration THC oil before bed so I sleep through side effects. From a recreational perspective, I prefer to Vape Sativa dominant cannabis with varying THC and CBD levels.

What advice do you have for women who want to get started in the industry?

I feel woman have an advantage simply because women shed a new perspective in a mostly male-dominated industry. Keep an open mind and let the creative juices flow as the industry is so new and untapped. Be persistent in your vision and don’t be reluctant to try new things or deviate from what society deems to be the standard. Always try and push the envelope and remember to have fun and enjoy the ride.

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JADEO News, Finance and The Law 1 week ago / Toronto, Ontario


The Buzz: Edition 24 - May 14th

Canadian’s Appetite For Cannabis Edibles Decrease

A new study from Dalhousie University led by Sylvain Charlebois, senior director of the Agrifood Analytics Lab, sought to determine if public opinion had changed about cannabis legalization, the findings were surprising for the research team.

According to the results, it appears the high times around legal weed are fizzling out as Charlebois says Canadians seem uninterested in cannabis, especially when it comes to the legalization of cannabis-infused edibles. “What we are getting out of the survey is that people aren’t quite as excited or enthusiastic about cannabis in general,” he said.

In 2017, before legalization, 46 per cent of respondents said they were interested in trying edibles, but in the new poll, that number had dropped to 36 per cent. - Global News

Over-Valued And Over-Regulated: Why Some Cannabis Investors Are Shunning Canadian Firms And Eyeing U.S. Operators Instead

Many Canadian licensed producers might never achieve profitability and eventually lose ground to their American counterparts because of oversupply and onerous marketing restrictions — the combination of which will lead to commoditization, according to some investors in the cannabis space.

“Industry commoditization will arrive before profits ever do. We forecast that Canadian LPs will not earn a profit in the next three years, nor will they be profitable thereafter,” Hass boldly predicted. - Financial Post

New Cannabis Licence Rules Could Make Canada's Supply Shortage Even Worse

The Canadian government said last week that it will now require applicants for cannabis cultivation, processing or sales licenses to have a fully built site before they apply. The goal is to alleviate the huge backlog that’s built up since Canada legalized recreational pot in October. About 614 applications were waiting in the queue as of March 31, according to a Health Canada spokeswoman.

“I think the fact that you now have to fully build out your site before you even apply means that people are going to build very small initial phases to try to mitigate risk and minimize the amount of money that has to be spent,” cannabis lawyer Trina Fraser, partner at Brazeau Seller Law, said in a phone interview.

Canada’s changes to its cannabis licensing requirements may make the country’s persistent pot shortage worse, not better, according to some in the industry.

“That could actually exacerbate the supply problem because it’s going to be difficult for those producers to expand and grow fast enough to meet demand,” Ottawa-based Fraser said. - Financial Post

First Outdoor Cannabis Cultivation Licence Awarded To BC Company

In a statement released today, Good Buds announced that it had been awarded an outdoor cultivation license for their Salt Spring Island property by Health Canada on May 10.

The company calls this a “market disruptor,” that would drastically lower not just costs, but reduce cannabis’ hefty carbon footprint. - Daily Hive

Aurora Cannabis And Radient Technologies Announce First Commercial Delivery of Cannabis Derivatives

Aurora Cannabis Inc. announced today that Aurora has taken delivery of Radient's first commercial batch of finished cannabis derivatives, from Radient's proprietary extraction platform. With this first batch, Radient has proven its enhanced ability to produce cannabinoid derivatives at commercial scale, and will continue to scale up production at Radient's cannabis facility in Edmonton , reaching an expected eventual annual throughput of approximately 300,000 kg of cannabis biomass at this single location. - Yahoo Finance

Quebec Backpedals On Plan To Ban Public Cannabis Smoking

The Quebec government is relaxing its plan to ban cannabis users from lighting up in parks and other public spaces, Radio-Canada has learned.

Premier François Legault has vowed to tighten restrictions on cannabis sales and consumption, making the proposed changes a part of his original election platform.

The province is planning to include an amendment in Bill 2 today after concluding a province-wide ban on public consumption wouldn't be enforceable. - CBC News

Cannabis Lounges Coming To Sin City

The Las Vegas City Council this month voted to allow existing dispensaries to apply for permits to open consumption lounges where tourists can use marijuana products in a cozy setting, perhaps with a meal and some live entertainment.


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JADEO Medical Cannabis 1 week ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} At What Point Should I Consider Cannabis As A Pain Treatment?

Is chronic pain affecting your quality of life? At what point should you consider cannabis as a treatment? Watch now as Dr. Peter Blecher, Chief Medical Officer, Starseed Medicinal Inc. explains.

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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

-


Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo


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JADEO CBD 1 week ago / Toronto, Ontario


Know The Lingo: Demystifying Full Spectrum, Broad Spectrum & Isolate In Cannabinoid Therapies

While the CBD craze has not yet hit Canada quite the way it has in the legal U.S., most Canadian Licenced Producers are developing CBD products specifically for a new, emerging market centered around wellness while the demand is skyrocketing. The new cannabis consumer is interested in CBD therapies and wants to know more about their options when making a purchase. With all the lingo floating around out there around CBD, we wanted to break down the different terms and highlight what they mean.

In a recent article, we broke down the term the entourage effect, which is founded on the idea that keeping plants whole may help you experience the full range of their benefits. It’s the principle that the entourage effect is founded on that positions many in the cannabis industry “against” cannabis isolates and concentrates.

Made up of hundreds of cannabinoids, cannabis is like the character tree in Game of Thrones: extremely complicated with impossible-to-remember names, and each name, no matter how seemingly random, is essential to the plotline. That cast of hundreds becomes far more significant when you take into account the entourage effect because it implies that cannabinoids have their greatest therapeutic benefits when they’re taken together, along with terpenes, the fragrant oils found in cannabis.

In Western medicine, researchers tend to study single compounds to find the “active” ingredient in botanicals. That ingredient is then isolated to be formulated into a drug. But the entourage effect argues that keeping all ingredients together is better for holistic healing.

When we see so many products toted as “full spectrum,” what they are implying is that the entire flower was used in the making of the medicine, offering the full range of benefits from the cannabinoids working in concert. Full spectrum is sometimes also called “whole plant.” As we’ve explained through the entourage effect, full spectrum provides more of the plant’s molecules in ratios and amounts that nature intended. While there is still more research to be done, there are indications that show cannabinoids and terpenes work together to influence each other.

So, what does CBD Isolate mean? Cannabidiol alone has been the subject of a lot of research as it stands out from the rest with what seems to be the widest therapeutic value, leaving patients and consumers to assume it would be best to take potently on its own. As the name suggests, these products have been isolated down to just the CBD molecule. They have no other active ingredient and just aim to deliver therapeutic doses of CBD, isolated from the other cannabinoids and terpenes.

CBD isolate products often come as a white powder or a mix with a carrier oil such as MCT oil for improved absorption. CBD isolates do allow users to easily get large amounts of CBD and know how much they’re getting. Isolates can sometimes be more expensive than full spectrum CBD. Isolates undergo more extensive refinement and require more plant matter in order to get high levels of isolated cannabidiol. CBD isolate products are generally labeled as being 99 percent or more pure CBD depending on the form they come in.

Broad spectrum CBD oils are oils that contain pretty much everything that full spectrum oils do, minus the THC. THC extraction can be achieved through special filtration techniques that remove that particular compound while leaving others intact. Alternatively, broad-spectrum oils can be created by starting with CBD isolate and then adding various cannabinoids, terpenes, and flavonoids.

Although studies have confirmed that full spectrum CBD is more beneficial, isolate has its uses as well, especially if you get it in its powdered form to use in various edibles. That said, full spectrum CBD is recommended in most cases, especially if it’s for use by a patient experiencing severe symptoms. If drug testing is a concern, you’re encouraged to seek out CBD isolate products or broad-spectrum products instead of full spectrum.

While there is much debate on which form is better, many experts believe that other cannabinoids, THC especially, are necessary to take full advantage of what cannabis has to offer. Ultimately, however, we are all different and it comes down to the individual user and their needs.

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