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JADEO Health & Wellness 5 days ago / Toronto, Ontario


The BEST Of Cannabis Spring Break travel

West Coast Cannabis spring break travel

Spring break has long been associated with beaches, booze, and bikinis in iconic destinations like Daytona Beach or Cabo San Lucas. But, what if tacos and tequila are not your thing? With March destination travel in mind, the team at JADEO wanted to take a closer look at cannabis friendly places Canadians can travel to this time of year to get away. While the world is still a complicated maze of permissions around medical travelers, the cluster of recreational states from California to the Pacific Northwest makes us want to fly west and follow the sun. Below we explore a few special places to check out along the cannabis trail of the West Coast.

Vancouver Island

Toted as the “Hawaii of Canada, Vancouver Island is known for its milder winters and early springs, with daffodil and crocus sightings as early as January. An hour ferry ride from Vancouver, the heart of “the island” would arguably be the Cowichan, known for majestic forests, crystal clear lakes, slow food, it’s beautiful bay, and the home of the first female-focused cannabis magazine The Her(b) Life. We wanted to highlight this stunning region because there are more sunshine hours in the Cowichan than anywhere else in B.C. In fact, the Cowichan means land warmed by the sun in the Coast Salish First Nation language. This region of Vancouver Island has the country’s warmest mean year-round temperature and is said to be Canada’s only Mediterranean climatic zone.

Cowichan Bay, Vancouver Island.
Cowichan Bay, Vancouver Island.

Across the island - along the western coast, Tofino attracts surfers from around the globe and conjures up ideas of VW vans and adventurous nature lovers with it’s Canadian West Coast lifestyle. Tofino is a perfect place for outdoor exploration, ocean, and cozy lodges. In contrast, Victoria is a busy little city a few hours south, on the southernmost tip of the island. The capital of B.C. attracts millions of tourists a year, many from cruise ships heading to or from Alaska. A great place to visit on a west coast getaway, Victoria boasts a plethora of dispensaries in its downtown core where visitors can purchase flower and follow along a guide known as the “weed walk,” by Hotel Zed. This a cannabis-friendly motel just north of the downtown core and promotes getting high exploring Victoria. Want to trip-hop over to Washington state? Small hovercrafts and ferries leave Victoria’s downtown harbour almost hourly heading to its sister city, Seattle.

Southern California

While the entire state boasts attractive places to visit with dispensaries aplenty, we wanted to feature the sunniest part of the state for a winter getaway. With cannabis available recreationally across California, there is no need to get a medical license or bring it in from outside the state (remember it is illegal to fly outside of Canada with cannabis). Since Southern California spans from Santa Barbara to San Diego, there are hundreds of tourist attractions from Hollywood to Disneyworld to the San Diego Zoo. In recent years, places that are lesser known have been coming into greater popularity, like Ojai, a small city north of Los Angeles that offers travelers a quieter place to getaway to, attracting bohemian millennials with its art galleries and new age shops.

Malibu, California

Malibu, California

Then there are places like Malibu or Palm Springs which offer more upscale accommodations with local dispensaries making posh pot accessible to tourists. Various portfolios of products such as oils, tinctures, resins, consumables, and strains have entered into the marketplace to offer a wide range of selection to tourists as well as locals. With the current state of legalization creating harsh restrictions on huge categories of products available in Canada, this type of variation and availability in California makes for a huge draw for the canna-tourist.

Oregon

A much-loved region for viticulture and homegrown, Oregon has become known as a hot destination for cannabis travel since the state legalized in 2014. Home to dozens of dispensaries and Instagram famous brands like @ladiesofparadise, cannabis have helped to put Portland on the map for travelers looking for cannabis experiences. Also, home to our recent Women in Cannabis Wednesday, Savina Fierro, Portland has been breaking the stigma and trailblazing with destination travel designed around this new scene.

A few favourites include Portland’s Japanese Gardens, the inner city hiking trails of Mount Tabor, Living Room Theaters, the legendary Voodoo Donuts, Pittock Mansion and the Portland Saturday Market.

Porland, Oregon
Porland, Oregon

Want to book somewhere special? The Jupiter boutique hotel in Portland made our worldwide list of canna-getaways for offering the first ever cannabis-friendly package in Oregon. This optional add on to your stay includes a munchie kit, a vape pen, Dope Magazine swag, and coupons to nearby dispensaries to buy your own cannabis.

Hawaii

Hawaii and has made news as of recent for relaxing laws for medical cannabis patients visiting as tourists. While in Hawaii, patients can now pay a fee to be able to use their cannabis prescriptions to obtain the plant safely and legally for medical purposes.

This round up of beautiful and fun destinations is sure to guarantee you an amazing spring break!

Related comments

  • From Janelle Simone

    So cool to see how cannabis and tourism are becoming the perfect pair!

Janelle Simone Health & Wellness 1 month ago / Scarborough, Ontario

Today I got diagnosed with obtrusive sleep apnea. In some areas of the world sleep apnea is a condition that qualifies for a medical cannabis prescription, though there's much divide over whether it is an effective treatment. Curious if anybody has used cannabis for sleep apnea?

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  • From 22

    I have and use Blue Star 2 oil from Starseed and i get a nice deep sleep and wake up great! But dont take it close to going to bed; can make you groggy in morning; take it 2-3 before... i take 1ml

    • From Janelle Simone

      Oh great! Will definitely look into trying and this and see how it works with me.

      • From Connor Christine

        I had a great experience at the North Star Wellness Clinic in Hamilton. You should check them out!

    • From Brianne Campbell

      Ahh taking it 2-3 hours before bed is a great idea!

JADEO Health & Wellness 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


How Manual Labour Affects Your Sleep

Regular exercise is associated with better sleep, so it’s natural to assume that physically demanding jobs might also enhance the sleep experience. It turns out, however, that compared to those who have low-activity jobs (working at a call center or as a computer programmer, for example), people who perform manual labor for a living (construction workers, farmers, and others) have a higher prevalence of sleep disturbances. Fortunately, there are steps you can take to combat the unique sleep challenges of manual labor and make sure your sleep is sound.

Why Manual Labor Sometimes Equals Less Sleep

The fact that physical jobs are correlated with more sleep disturbances may be because manual labor can lead to musculoskeletal pain, which can make it tough to relax enough to fall asleep. It’s also possible that some higher-activity jobs, like being a firefighter, can be stressful, and greater stress has been linked with difficulty falling and staying asleep.

Why Sleep Matters

Healthy sleep is very important for your health and for your productivity on the job. You need sleep in order to feel energized during the day, and to decrease the chance of health conditions such as heart disease and weight gain.

How to Make Sure Your Sleep Is Sound

Though it is unlikely that you can choose your hours around your sleep schedule, you can maximize the quantity and quality of sleep that you do get. Talk with your doctor about strategies that could lead to improved sleep. For example, activities that reduce stress levels—such as relaxation exercises , meditating, cannabis, or winding down at night with a bath and good book—could help you fall asleep faster and get more hours of sleep.

Source: The National Sleep Foundation

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JADEO Health & Wellness 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


Beyond CPAP: Could Medical Cannabis Treat Sleep Apnea?

Source: Sleep Review: The Journal For Sleep Specialists
By Lisa Spear

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a molecule found in cannabis that is commonly known for its psychoactive properties, could be a viable therapy for obstructive sleep apnea, but research in this area is still in its infancy.

The Minnesota Department of Health approved medical cannabis for the treatment of sleep apnea last year. This means that in August the first sleep apnea patients were able to obtain medical cannabis under state law, though it remains classified as an illegal Schedule 1 narcotic on the federal level. While some providers feel the state’s decision is a step in the right direction, it has ignited a debate among sleep medicine physicians about whether there is enough evidence of the plant’s effectiveness to recommend its use for patient populations.

Not long after the department’s announcement, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) came forward with a statement against the use of medical cannabis for sleep apnea.¹ “We do not have enough data to tell us if it is OK to use it at this point,” says Kannan Ramar, MBBS, MD, professor of medicine in the division of pulmonary and critical care medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

In a brief, the Minnesota Department of Health cited recent research, including a clinical trial on dronabinol, synthetic THC that has been used for years to prevent nausea in chemotherapy patients.² The medication was a new approach to the treatment of sleep apnea because it targeted the brain instead of the physical problem of collapsing airways. This reflects the new idea that sleep apnea is not just a physical problem but may be caused by several factors, including poor regulation of the upper airway muscles by the brain. The study from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) and Northwestern Medicine was published in the journal SLEEP in 2017.³

Dronabinol had positive outcomes in some subjects, possibly by increasing airway muscle tone. After six weeks of treatment, patients experienced fewer episodes of shallow breathing and apneas throughout the night. The primary outcome was that dronabinol decreased the severity of the disorder (as assessed by the apnea-hypopnea index) by 33% of the pretreatment value, on average among all subjects.

The researchers think that dronabinol works by binding to cannabinoid receptors on the nerves that regulate the upper airway muscles. This inhibits activation of the vagus nerve, which increases muscle activity to stop airway collapse during sleep, says the principal investigator of the study, David Carley, PhD, a professor of biobehavioral health sciences, medicine, and bioengineering at UIC.

He cautions that while this work could lead to new treatments for sleep apnea, the promising results of the study do not apply directly to the cannabis plant in its natural form—since dronabinol was studied in isolation. Any reference to his research to justify the approval of medical cannabis is taking his work out of context, Carley says, since cannabis plants contain over a hundred biologically active molecules that interact with one another.

The drug dronabinol contains just one biologically active molecule. Further research is needed to fully understand how other molecules found in cannabis plants might impact patients with sleep apnea, says Carley.

“I’m not saying that it wouldn’t be or couldn’t be therapeutic; I’m saying that we don’t have any data on that yet,” he says. “There is a lot more work that needs to be done.”

Research manager in the Minnesota Department of Health’s Office of Medical Cannabis, Thomas Arneson, MD, MPH, agrees. The former Minnesota Commissioner of Health Ed Ehlinger, MD, MSPH, made the decision to give sleep apnea patients the freedom to try medical cannabis to see if it works for them on an individual basis, but patients should still use caution, says Arneson.

“If you choose to use some cannabis products, bear in mind, that there is very little research evidence that shows that it works, and if you do use it make sure to check back in with your healthcare provider to make sure it is working for you,” he says.

In the dronabinol study, the researchers found significant improvement in the objective measures of severity of obstructive sleep apnea compared to the participants who took placebos. The subjects’ breathing during sleep and daytime alertness improved. These are positive signals that dronabinol, at least, potentially has a therapeutic, positive effect in patients with obstructive sleep apnea, says Carley.

A drug that treats the cause of sleep apnea could one day give patients more options to manage their condition. “The CPAP device targets the physical problem but not the cause,” says co-lead author Phyllis Zee, MD, in a release. “The drug targets the brain and nerves that regulate the upper airway muscles. It alters the neurotransmitters from the brain that communicate with the muscles. Better understanding of this will help us develop more effective and personalized treatments for sleep apnea.”

New cannabis therapies for sleep apnea are already on the horizon. Nasal respiratory and sleep technology company Rhinomed recently announced that it is partnering with the medical cannabis company Columbia Care to develop a product that can be administered through the nose with a nasal stent during sleep. The investigational cannabis product would treat several qualifying conditions, including obstructive sleep apnea.

“It is administered almost like a dermal patch, but inside the nose. What we can do is we can deliver a very set amount over a set period of time,” says Michael Johnson, CEO of Rhinomed. “And because it is going directly into the blood, into your circulatory system, we can actually use a much lower amount to achieve a clinical outcome than if you were to swallow it.”

This could offer an alternative to CPAP therapy. “That’s really interesting to us because certainly compliance rates with CPAP are under 40%. It’s an expensive therapy, patients don’t really like it, and yet there’s been no innovation in the sector for a long time,” says Johnson. “Here is an opportunity, potentially, to create a whole new mode of therapy that actually doesn’t treat the symptom of sleep apnea, but actually goes to ask the question: What is the underlying cause, what is the underlying reason why people have apnea?”

References

1. Ramar K, Rosen IM, Kirsch DB, et al. Medical Cannabis and the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An American Academy of Sleep Medicine Position Statement. J Clin Sleep Med. 2018 Apr 15;14(4):679-81.

2. Minnesota Department of Health. Issue Brief on Obstructive Sleep Apnea. 2017 Sept. Available at www.health.state.mn.us/topics/cannabis/rulemaking/sleepapneabrief.pdf.

3. Carley DW, Prasad B, Reid KJ, et al. Pharmacotherapy of apnea by cannabimimetic enhancement, the PACE clinical trial: effects of dronabinol in obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep. 2018 Jan 1;41(1).

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JADEO Health & Wellness 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


Why Lack Of Sleep Is Bad For Your Health

Many effects of a lack of sleep, such as feeling grumpy and not working at your best, are well known. But did you know that sleep deprivation can also have profound consequences on your physical health?

One in 3 of us suffers from poor sleep, with stress, computers and taking work home often blamed.

However, the cost of all those sleepless nights is more than just bad moods and a lack of focus.

Regular poor sleep puts you at risk of serious medical conditions, including obesity, heart disease and diabetes – and it shortens your life expectancy.

It's now clear that a solid night's sleep is essential for a long and healthy life.

How much sleep do we need?

Most of us need around 8 hours of good-quality sleep a night to function properly – but some need more and some less. What matters is that you find out how much sleep you need and then try to achieve it.

As a general rule, if you wake up tired and spend the day longing for a chance to have a nap, it's likely that you're not getting enough sleep.

A variety of factors can cause poor sleep, including health conditions such as sleep apnoea. But in most cases, it's due to bad sleeping habits.

What happens if I don't sleep?

Everyone's experienced the fatigue, short temper and lack of focus that often follow a poor night's sleep.

An occasional night without sleep makes you feel tired and irritable the next day, but it won't harm your health.

After several sleepless nights, the mental effects become more serious. Your brain will fog, making it difficult to concentrate and make decisions. You'll start to feel down, and may fall asleep during the day. Your risk of injury and accidents at home, work and on the road also increases.

If it continues, lack of sleep can affect your overall health and make you prone to serious medical conditions, such as obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes.

Here are 7 ways in which a good night's sleep can boost your health:

1. Sleep boosts immunity

If you seem to catch every cold and flu that's going around, your bedtime could be to blame. Prolonged lack of sleep can disrupt your immune system, so you're less able to fend off bugs.

2. Sleep can slim you

Sleeping less may mean you put on weight! Studies have shown that people who sleep less than 7 hours a day tend to gain more weight and have a higher risk of becoming obese than those who get 7 hours of slumber.

It's believed to be because sleep-deprived people have reduced levels of leptin (the chemical that makes you feel full) and increased levels of ghrelin (the hunger-stimulating hormone).

3. Sleep boosts mental wellbeing

Given that a single sleepless night can make you irritable and moody the following day, it's not surprising that chronic sleep debt may lead to long-term mood disorders like depression and anxiety.

When people with anxiety or depression were surveyed to calculate their sleeping habits, it turned out that most of them slept for less than 6 hours a night.

4. Sleep prevents diabetes

Studies have suggested that people who usually sleep less than 5 hours a night have an increased risk of developing diabetes.

It seems that missing out on deep sleep may lead to type 2 diabetes by changing the way the body processes glucose, which the body uses for energy.

5. Sleep increases sex drive

Men and women who don't get enough quality sleep have lower libidos and less of an interest in sex, research suggests.

Men who suffer from sleep apnoea – a disorder in which breathing difficulties lead to interrupted sleep – also tend to have lower testosterone levels, which can lower libido.

6. Sleep wards off heart disease

Long-standing sleep deprivation seems to be associated with increased heart rate, an increase in blood pressure and higher levels of certain chemicals linked with inflammation, which may put extra strain on your heart.

7. Sleep increases fertility

Difficulty conceiving a baby has been claimed as one of the effects of sleep deprivation, in both men and women. Apparently, regular sleep disruptions can cause trouble conceiving by reducing the secretion of reproductive hormones.

How to catch up on lost sleep

If you don't get enough sleep, there's only one way to compensate – getting more sleep.

It won't happen with a single early night. If you've had months of restricted sleep, you'll have built up a significant sleep debt, so expect recovery to take several weeks.

Starting on a weekend, try to add on an extra hour or 2 of sleep a night. The way to do this is to go to bed when you're tired, and allow your body to wake you in the morning (no alarm clocks allowed!).

Expect to sleep for upwards of 10 hours a night at first. After a while, the amount of time you sleep will gradually decrease to a normal level.

Don't rely on caffeine or energy drinks as a short-term pick-me-up. They may boost your energy and concentration temporarily, but can disrupt your sleep patterns even further in the long term.

Source: National Health Service UK

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JADEO Health & Wellness 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


Can CBD Help You Sleep Better? How CBD Treats Insomnia (VIDEO)

We love the way Thomas DeLauer discusses CBD and sleep, and breaks down how CBD treats sleep disorders like insomnia.

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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

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#WeAreJADEO

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  • From 22

    Good info...

JADEO Health & Wellness 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


11 Tips For Healthy Sleep

Healthy sleep habits can make a big difference in your quality of life. Having healthy sleep habits is often referred to as having good sleep hygiene. In an effort to achieve good sleep hygiene and get a good nights rest, try to maintain following sleep practices on a consistent basis:

1. Stick to a sleep schedule of the same bedtime and wake up time, even on the weekends.

This helps to regulate your body's clock and could help you fall asleep and stay asleep for the night.

2. Practice a relaxing bedtime ritual.

A relaxing, routine activity right before bedtime conducted away from bright lights helps separate your sleep time from activities that can cause excitement, stress or anxiety which can make it more difficult to fall asleep, get sound and deep sleep or remain asleep.

3. If you have trouble sleeping, avoid naps, especially in the afternoon.

Power napping may help you get through the day, but if you find that you can't fall asleep at bedtime, eliminating even short catnaps may help.

4. Exercise daily.

Vigorous exercise is best, but even light exercise is better than no activity. Exercise at any time of day, but not at the expense of your sleep.

5. Evaluate your room.

Design your sleep environment to establish the conditions you need for sleep. Your bedroom should be cool –between 60 and 67 degrees. Your bedroom should also be free from any noise that can disturb your sleep. Finally, your bedroom should be free from any light. Check your room for noises or other distractions. This includes a bed partner's sleep disruptions such as snoring. Consider using blackout curtains, eye shades, ear plugs, "white noise" machines, humidifiers, fans and other devices.

6. Sleep on a comfortable mattress and pillows.

Make sure your mattress is comfortable and supportive. The one you have been using for years may have exceeded its life expectancy – about 9 or 10 years for most good quality mattresses. Have comfortable pillows and make the room attractive and inviting for sleep but also free of allergens that might affect you and objects that might cause you to slip or fall if you have to get up

7. Use bright light to help manage your circadian rhythms.

Avoid bright light in the evening and expose yourself to sunlight in the morning. This will keep your circadian rhythms in check.

8. Avoid alcohol, cigarettes, and heavy meals in the evening.

Alcohol, cigarettes and caffeine can disrupt sleep. Eating big or spicy meals can cause discomfort from indigestion that can make it hard to sleep. If you can, avoid eating large meals for two to three hours before bedtime. Try a light snack 45 minutes before bed if you’re still hungry.

9. Wind down.

Your body needs time to shift into sleep mode, so spend the last hour before bed doing a calming activity such as reading. For some people, using an electronic device such as a laptop can make it hard to fall asleep, because the particular type of light emanating from the screens of these devices is activating to the brain. If you have trouble sleeping, avoid electronics before bed or in the middle of the night.

10. If you can't sleep, go into another room and do something relaxing until you feel tired.

It is best to take work materials, computers and televisions out of the sleeping environment. Use your bed only for sleep and sex to strengthen the association between bed and sleep. If you associate a particular activity or item with anxiety about sleeping, omit it from your bedtime routine.

11. If you’re still having trouble sleeping

Don’t hesitate to speak with your doctor or to find a sleep professional. You may also benefit from recording your sleep in a Sleep Diary to help you better evaluate common patterns or issues you may see with your sleep or sleeping habits.

Source: The National Sleep Foundation

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Stay Informed. Stay Healthy.
#WeAreJADEO

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  • From Burge

    Wow, this is great. I need to follow some of these...

    • From Janelle Simone

      Agreed!

JADEO Health & Wellness 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


The Science Of Smell In A Good Night’s Sleep

Sleep hygiene is a concept that is getting more attention in recent years, something that can play a key role for insomnia sufferers in getting a good night’s sleep. As we all know, getting a good night’s sleep is key to being able to focus during the day, so we wanted to do a deeper dive into the nuances of herbal medicine to support JADEO readers on their quest for deep, therapeutic rest!

Sleep experts typically recommend creating a soothing sleep environment devoid of electronic distractions, avoiding caffeine and other stimulants in the hours before bed, and establishing a nighttime routine. These habits can all help you achieve that sought after well-rested feeling in the morning.

Our recent deep dive into cannabinoids for sleep illuminated the role of CBN, a little-known cannabinoid with medically identified sedative effects. Because a good night’s rest is so important for overall health and healing, we wanted to explore further and look at what other herbal therapies go hand in hand with cannabis for sleep?

Best Terpenes For A Calming, Sedating Effect


The tweet from Green Relief is true! Scientists are working to demystify the effects of terpenes on properties of cannabis, and as they uncover more of the connection between the scent profiles and powers of the plant, we can use their findings to select the best weed strains for sleep.

First, you may be wondering - what are terpenes?

Terpenes can be defined as “any of a large group of volatile unsaturated hydrocarbons found in the essential oils of plants, especially conifers and citrus trees” and can be found in the same glands that produce THC and CBD.

Female cannabis plants, especially, produce trichomes (the small fuzzy and crystal-like) hairs found on buds, which produce THC, CBD, flavonoids, and terpenes.

Terpenes, not only give your smoke its aroma and colour, but terpenes are also known to have a variety of medicinal attributes that are anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory and can benefit people suffering from the likes of asthma, depression, chronic pain, and much more.

While we are discovering that a range of terpenes are good for anxiety or nervousness, one particular terpene, called myrcene, is known to have a sedating effect which is helpful to induce sleep. Also found in mangos, lemongrass and thyme - it’s benefits include pain reduction, relief from inflammation and antioxidant properties.

Best Essential Oils For Sleep + Relaxation

As mentioned, the terpenes in cannabis are found in the essential oils of many other plants. Many of these plants have had traditional medicinal uses for hundreds of years. Some of these traditional medicinal uses include calming or sleep-inducing effects. Some of the popular favourites are found in lavender, chamomile, ylang-ylang, neroli, and cedarwood.

Best Herbal Teas or Tinctures For Sleep

Not surprisingly using many of the same herbs in teas and tinctures can also help lull you to sleep. In addition to common herbs lavender and chamomile, we suggest strong herbs that may not have as pleasing aromatic profiles, such as passionflower, valerian or hops to help knock you out. Both infusing herbs as a tea or taking them orally as a potent extraction (tincture) are wonderful ways to use the power of natural medicine to guide the body to a restful state. Combining the powers of herbal medicine with optimal sleep hygiene practices should send you well on your way to restful zzzs.


Remember to always consult a medical professional before starting any new health care regimen.

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#WeAreJADEO

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  • From 22

    Absolutely

JADEO Health & Wellness 2 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


Cannabis And Sleep: Is CDB And/Or THC The Answer To Your Sleep Woes?

It’s an issue that affects us all; quality and duration of sleep. Whether you’re a busy 9-5er, a relaxed retiree or anywhere in between, it can be hard to get your recommended seven hours a day. While humans have been using puffs of Indica's to help lull into a bedtime slumber for thousands of years, new medical research is beginning to back that adding cannabis as a sleep aid has the potential to help with any short-term sleep troubles.

While we know certain strains of cannabis can be used as a sedative and sleep agent, the jury is still out on what formulation uniquely treats difficulty sleeping. THC and CBD have alternating effects on sleep depending on dosage. Anecdotal and research evidence hasn’t given us great guidelines on exact measured milligram levels, although a 1:1 mixture of both has been shown to have maximum sleep benefit in people suffering from chronic pain, according to a 2017 review on the role of cannabinoids in sleep disorders.

Less Isn't Always More

Based on the research that has been done so far, there is counter-intuitive information that shows you can be fooled by common assumptions around cannabis and sleep. For example, high dose CBD has been shown to help with sleep, but low dose CBD has been shown to have stimulant effects. Studies in both humans and mice which administered lower doses of CBD demonstrated increased wakefulness. Another study of medical cannabis users found that users treating insomnia were more likely to use high dose CBD strains. More research needs to be done on exact dosing, but these insights can bring medical cannabis consumers the insight needed to use CBD effectively for a good night's sleep.

Know Your Cannabinoids

Researcher Dr. Evan Russo identified sedative effects in the cannabinoid known as cannabinol (CBN), which is found in smokable flower in increasing concentrations over time through the oxidation of THC. She argues that the sativa and indica designations are useless, and recommends focusing on cannabinoid content instead - promoting the quest for higher levels of CBN in a strain designated for sleep.

Watch Your Tolerance

Sleep latency is a key benefit of cannabis for sleep, meaning it can help you fall asleep more quickly, and stay asleep longer. Short-term cannabis use can help you fall asleep faster, but for some people, that’s not always the case. Some early studies point to the development of tolerance to the sedative effects in some people who report long-term cannabis usage.

Practice Makes Perfect?

Different modes of ingestion yield different effects, so consider trying an oil and a flower vape while you test out what works best for you. We know that in general, ingesting cannabis orally has a prolonged, body-high effect that is uneven in onset, while inhaling cannabis has a more immediate and pronounced impact on your body. Personalized treatment for sleep, as with any condition, is the best way to achieve optimal results.

So, does cannabis improve or cure sleep deficiencies? The verdict is still officially out on that as more research needs to be done. However, current research does prove it can provide some relief to a number of individuals.

Remember to always consult a medical professional before starting any new health care regimen.

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  • From Romes_416

    It helps me sleep for sure!

JADEO Health & Wellness 2 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


Cannabis And Fitness: The Real Deal

The stoner stereotype is slowly being blazed away as a new image of cannabis is emerging, one which can be linked to an active, healthy life. JADEO wanted to explore the relationship between cannabis and fitness for our readers so we took a look at what the research says and new, emerging best practice trends.

Remembering that the role of the endocannabinoid system is to achieve homeostasis and balance, it makes perfect sense that cannabis would be used as a natural health and wellness tool, but the stigmas around cannabis use may make us second guess it’s place in fitness. In fact, it can provide energy, endurance, pain relief from a sports injury, and can speed up muscle recovery. When using cannabis for its medicinal properties, it’s important to remember that it’s best consumed in conjunction with exercise, clean food, proper rest, meditation and self-care.

Cannabis and Sports Medicine

As we develop a new understanding of cannabis and health, we should consider the shift it has undergone in sports-related industries. The old and new attitudes of cannabis’ place in sports medicine reflect this shift, asking us to consider why athletes use it?

Once on the “prohibited list” of the The World Anti-Doping Agency, cannabidiol (CBD) was removed from the list in 2018 as a response to current scientific knowledge citing CBD’s benefits for pain and anxiety and the input of various stakeholders. As the leader in establishing standards for athletes regarding the use of performance-enhancing substances during competition, the lift of a 14-year long ban on any form of cannabis in competitive sports is paving the way for many professional athletes to acknowledge cannabis use in their career.

Cannabis can offer athletes relief from chronic and acute pain without subjecting them to the liver toxicity of anti-inflammatory meds or the addiction of opiate pain relievers. We now see the celebrity of athletes who are public about their use of cannabis helping to remove the negative stigmas associated with its use in sports. In fact, the NFL has publicly stated that cannabis for pain management deserves further research because it works so well anecdotally. NBA players have publicly stated that more than 80 percent of current players use cannabis for relief. NFL players have quoted stats around 89 percent.

With this kind of known presence in professional sports, we see how industry can shift common perception and invite cannabis into the wellbeing of professional athletes and give way for it in the fitness space. As we’ve transitioned into legalization, we’ve seen more sports aligned brands bring cannabis into the picture. For those of us who are not high-performance athletes, are we able to reap the same benefits? What can it offer the average individual who is looking to be active and mindful of their wellbeing?

Cannabis for Energy + focus

One of cannabis’ powerful effects is in heightening senses, but the high associated with the plant can be somewhat of a deterrent when wanting to be active and clear minded. So if you’re wondering how you can enhance your exercise routines with cannabis but not get high, the secret is in microdosing. That’s right, microdosing is defined by consuming a small, measured dose of cannabis at separate intervals that allows you to keep a sustained effect. Some athletes microdose pre-workout to bring a state of relaxation and focus to their training routine without getting high. In this relaxed mental state, anxiety and negative thinking recede and limitations are reduced, aiding at getting in “the zone.”

Many Canadians thoughtfully consume cannabis leading up to a workout with the intention of improving the overall experience. Cannabis is known to enhance the mind/body/nature connection, often providing us with a boost of inspiration which can help with our motivation before and during a workout. The most common applications would be low dose cannabis oil drops under the tongue or vaporizing a Sativa-dominant hybrid with a flower vaporizer.

Taking this approach requires the cannabis user to see cannabis as an enabler, and to thoughtfully choose strains that will boost energy and bring focus. People will usually choose a Sativa strain before a workout while relying on an Indica-dominant strain for more low-impact activities like yoga.

Cannabis for pain relief + muscle recovery

Further cannabis dosing helps reduce the inflammation and associated pain with sports injuries or soreness, after your workout. Since cannabis is a known analgesic, it is great for pain relief. This therapeutic benefit can be of assistance with muscle recovery and CBD, which is present in some ratio with THC in each strain is able to reduce inflammation.

Although they are not yet available in the legal space in Canada, cannabis topicals are known to offer powerful help to ease sore muscles. More and more individuals are googling for simple directions on how to make their own cannabis topicals at home and finding relief in balms and salves containing cannabis.

Properties of cannabis, when applied topically, target inflammation in that area and have been dramatically effective in helping me reduce muscle recovery times. Cannabis topicals are not known to induce a high so they are an excellent way for an athlete to introduce the natural benefits of cannabis into their life.

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Michael Joseph Health & Wellness 3 months ago / Hamilton , Ontario

Athletes everywhere are coming together and advocating for the same purpose, change the perceptions and stigma around cannabis in professional sports. Athletes are not looking to get stoned, they are looking for relief. https://www.mensjournal.com/health-fitness/18-of-the-biggest-marijuana-advocates-in-pro-sports-w429975/

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18 of the Biggest Cannabis Advocates in Pro Sports

Men's Journal

Not long ago, whenever professional athletes dabbled with marijuana, it was bad news: multigame suspensions, ruined careers, endless stoner jokes. Not anymore. Just take a look at this week's Sports Illustrated, which dedicated its cover story to former NFL running back Ricky Williams' relationship with cannabis.

https://www.mensjournal.com/health-fitness/18-of-the-bi...

Related comments

  • From Brianne Campbell

    Didn't know some of those athletes were pro-cannabis! It's interesting to see how many athletes are advocates for cannabis after spending years playing contact sports.

  • From 22

    WOW!! Did not know all the professional athletes Male and Female from all these different sports of NFL, MMA< NBA, NHL, MLB, Olympics and ski, +++ were and are advocates and supporters.. BRAVO!!

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Michael Joseph Health & Wellness 3 months ago / Hamilton , Ontario

Cannabis has been apart of large discussions nowadays in regards to sleep. What are your thoughts, or experiences with cannabis and sleep? What are you using, CBD or THC, or THC&CBD? How are you using it?

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  • From EatSleepRun

    When I have a tough time falling asleep, I have a piece of THC infused (indica) chocolate and usually pass right out. I’ve been wondering though if I’m getting a true sleep or just losing consciousness.

    • From Burge

      I would imagine you would be getting a good rest. Once the chocolate is metabolized, your body and mind are relaxed, making you drift off into your sleep. For me, I'm pretty basic, I tend to put a heavy indica dominant strain in the vape, and take a couple puffs about 30 minutes before I am ready to sleep. Has worked like a charm! :)

      • From EatSleepRun

        I should try that. Probably much more efficient than waiting for chocolate to metabolize!!

JADEO Health & Wellness 5 days ago / Toronto, Ontario


The BEST Of Cannabis Spring Break travel

West Coast Cannabis spring break travel

Spring break has long been associated with beaches, booze, and bikinis in iconic destinations like Daytona Beach or Cabo San Lucas. But, what if tacos and tequila are not your thing? With March destination travel in mind, the team at JADEO wanted to take a closer look at cannabis friendly places Canadians can travel to this time of year to get away. While the world is still a complicated maze of permissions around medical travelers, the cluster of recreational states from California to the Pacific Northwest makes us want to fly west and follow the sun. Below we explore a few special places to check out along the cannabis trail of the West Coast.

Vancouver Island

Toted as the “Hawaii of Canada, Vancouver Island is known for its milder winters and early springs, with daffodil and crocus sightings as early as January. An hour ferry ride from Vancouver, the heart of “the island” would arguably be the Cowichan, known for majestic forests, crystal clear lakes, slow food, it’s beautiful bay, and the home of the first female-focused cannabis magazine The Her(b) Life. We wanted to highlight this stunning region because there are more sunshine hours in the Cowichan than anywhere else in B.C. In fact, the Cowichan means land warmed by the sun in the Coast Salish First Nation language. This region of Vancouver Island has the country’s warmest mean year-round temperature and is said to be Canada’s only Mediterranean climatic zone.

Cowichan Bay, Vancouver Island.
Cowichan Bay, Vancouver Island.

Across the island - along the western coast, Tofino attracts surfers from around the globe and conjures up ideas of VW vans and adventurous nature lovers with it’s Canadian West Coast lifestyle. Tofino is a perfect place for outdoor exploration, ocean, and cozy lodges. In contrast, Victoria is a busy little city a few hours south, on the southernmost tip of the island. The capital of B.C. attracts millions of tourists a year, many from cruise ships heading to or from Alaska. A great place to visit on a west coast getaway, Victoria boasts a plethora of dispensaries in its downtown core where visitors can purchase flower and follow along a guide known as the “weed walk,” by Hotel Zed. This a cannabis-friendly motel just north of the downtown core and promotes getting high exploring Victoria. Want to trip-hop over to Washington state? Small hovercrafts and ferries leave Victoria’s downtown harbour almost hourly heading to its sister city, Seattle.

Southern California

While the entire state boasts attractive places to visit with dispensaries aplenty, we wanted to feature the sunniest part of the state for a winter getaway. With cannabis available recreationally across California, there is no need to get a medical license or bring it in from outside the state (remember it is illegal to fly outside of Canada with cannabis). Since Southern California spans from Santa Barbara to San Diego, there are hundreds of tourist attractions from Hollywood to Disneyworld to the San Diego Zoo. In recent years, places that are lesser known have been coming into greater popularity, like Ojai, a small city north of Los Angeles that offers travelers a quieter place to getaway to, attracting bohemian millennials with its art galleries and new age shops.

Malibu, California

Malibu, California

Then there are places like Malibu or Palm Springs which offer more upscale accommodations with local dispensaries making posh pot accessible to tourists. Various portfolios of products such as oils, tinctures, resins, consumables, and strains have entered into the marketplace to offer a wide range of selection to tourists as well as locals. With the current state of legalization creating harsh restrictions on huge categories of products available in Canada, this type of variation and availability in California makes for a huge draw for the canna-tourist.

Oregon

A much-loved region for viticulture and homegrown, Oregon has become known as a hot destination for cannabis travel since the state legalized in 2014. Home to dozens of dispensaries and Instagram famous brands like @ladiesofparadise, cannabis have helped to put Portland on the map for travelers looking for cannabis experiences. Also, home to our recent Women in Cannabis Wednesday, Savina Fierro, Portland has been breaking the stigma and trailblazing with destination travel designed around this new scene.

A few favourites include Portland’s Japanese Gardens, the inner city hiking trails of Mount Tabor, Living Room Theaters, the legendary Voodoo Donuts, Pittock Mansion and the Portland Saturday Market.

Porland, Oregon
Porland, Oregon

Want to book somewhere special? The Jupiter boutique hotel in Portland made our worldwide list of canna-getaways for offering the first ever cannabis-friendly package in Oregon. This optional add on to your stay includes a munchie kit, a vape pen, Dope Magazine swag, and coupons to nearby dispensaries to buy your own cannabis.

Hawaii

Hawaii and has made news as of recent for relaxing laws for medical cannabis patients visiting as tourists. While in Hawaii, patients can now pay a fee to be able to use their cannabis prescriptions to obtain the plant safely and legally for medical purposes.

This round up of beautiful and fun destinations is sure to guarantee you an amazing spring break!

Related comments

  • From Janelle Simone

    So cool to see how cannabis and tourism are becoming the perfect pair!

JADEO Health & Wellness 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


How Manual Labour Affects Your Sleep

Regular exercise is associated with better sleep, so it’s natural to assume that physically demanding jobs might also enhance the sleep experience. It turns out, however, that compared to those who have low-activity jobs (working at a call center or as a computer programmer, for example), people who perform manual labor for a living (construction workers, farmers, and others) have a higher prevalence of sleep disturbances. Fortunately, there are steps you can take to combat the unique sleep challenges of manual labor and make sure your sleep is sound.

Why Manual Labor Sometimes Equals Less Sleep

The fact that physical jobs are correlated with more sleep disturbances may be because manual labor can lead to musculoskeletal pain, which can make it tough to relax enough to fall asleep. It’s also possible that some higher-activity jobs, like being a firefighter, can be stressful, and greater stress has been linked with difficulty falling and staying asleep.

Why Sleep Matters

Healthy sleep is very important for your health and for your productivity on the job. You need sleep in order to feel energized during the day, and to decrease the chance of health conditions such as heart disease and weight gain.

How to Make Sure Your Sleep Is Sound

Though it is unlikely that you can choose your hours around your sleep schedule, you can maximize the quantity and quality of sleep that you do get. Talk with your doctor about strategies that could lead to improved sleep. For example, activities that reduce stress levels—such as relaxation exercises , meditating, cannabis, or winding down at night with a bath and good book—could help you fall asleep faster and get more hours of sleep.

Source: The National Sleep Foundation

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JADEO Health & Wellness 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


Beyond CPAP: Could Medical Cannabis Treat Sleep Apnea?

Source: Sleep Review: The Journal For Sleep Specialists
By Lisa Spear

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a molecule found in cannabis that is commonly known for its psychoactive properties, could be a viable therapy for obstructive sleep apnea, but research in this area is still in its infancy.

The Minnesota Department of Health approved medical cannabis for the treatment of sleep apnea last year. This means that in August the first sleep apnea patients were able to obtain medical cannabis under state law, though it remains classified as an illegal Schedule 1 narcotic on the federal level. While some providers feel the state’s decision is a step in the right direction, it has ignited a debate among sleep medicine physicians about whether there is enough evidence of the plant’s effectiveness to recommend its use for patient populations.

Not long after the department’s announcement, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) came forward with a statement against the use of medical cannabis for sleep apnea.¹ “We do not have enough data to tell us if it is OK to use it at this point,” says Kannan Ramar, MBBS, MD, professor of medicine in the division of pulmonary and critical care medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

In a brief, the Minnesota Department of Health cited recent research, including a clinical trial on dronabinol, synthetic THC that has been used for years to prevent nausea in chemotherapy patients.² The medication was a new approach to the treatment of sleep apnea because it targeted the brain instead of the physical problem of collapsing airways. This reflects the new idea that sleep apnea is not just a physical problem but may be caused by several factors, including poor regulation of the upper airway muscles by the brain. The study from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) and Northwestern Medicine was published in the journal SLEEP in 2017.³

Dronabinol had positive outcomes in some subjects, possibly by increasing airway muscle tone. After six weeks of treatment, patients experienced fewer episodes of shallow breathing and apneas throughout the night. The primary outcome was that dronabinol decreased the severity of the disorder (as assessed by the apnea-hypopnea index) by 33% of the pretreatment value, on average among all subjects.

The researchers think that dronabinol works by binding to cannabinoid receptors on the nerves that regulate the upper airway muscles. This inhibits activation of the vagus nerve, which increases muscle activity to stop airway collapse during sleep, says the principal investigator of the study, David Carley, PhD, a professor of biobehavioral health sciences, medicine, and bioengineering at UIC.

He cautions that while this work could lead to new treatments for sleep apnea, the promising results of the study do not apply directly to the cannabis plant in its natural form—since dronabinol was studied in isolation. Any reference to his research to justify the approval of medical cannabis is taking his work out of context, Carley says, since cannabis plants contain over a hundred biologically active molecules that interact with one another.

The drug dronabinol contains just one biologically active molecule. Further research is needed to fully understand how other molecules found in cannabis plants might impact patients with sleep apnea, says Carley.

“I’m not saying that it wouldn’t be or couldn’t be therapeutic; I’m saying that we don’t have any data on that yet,” he says. “There is a lot more work that needs to be done.”

Research manager in the Minnesota Department of Health’s Office of Medical Cannabis, Thomas Arneson, MD, MPH, agrees. The former Minnesota Commissioner of Health Ed Ehlinger, MD, MSPH, made the decision to give sleep apnea patients the freedom to try medical cannabis to see if it works for them on an individual basis, but patients should still use caution, says Arneson.

“If you choose to use some cannabis products, bear in mind, that there is very little research evidence that shows that it works, and if you do use it make sure to check back in with your healthcare provider to make sure it is working for you,” he says.

In the dronabinol study, the researchers found significant improvement in the objective measures of severity of obstructive sleep apnea compared to the participants who took placebos. The subjects’ breathing during sleep and daytime alertness improved. These are positive signals that dronabinol, at least, potentially has a therapeutic, positive effect in patients with obstructive sleep apnea, says Carley.

A drug that treats the cause of sleep apnea could one day give patients more options to manage their condition. “The CPAP device targets the physical problem but not the cause,” says co-lead author Phyllis Zee, MD, in a release. “The drug targets the brain and nerves that regulate the upper airway muscles. It alters the neurotransmitters from the brain that communicate with the muscles. Better understanding of this will help us develop more effective and personalized treatments for sleep apnea.”

New cannabis therapies for sleep apnea are already on the horizon. Nasal respiratory and sleep technology company Rhinomed recently announced that it is partnering with the medical cannabis company Columbia Care to develop a product that can be administered through the nose with a nasal stent during sleep. The investigational cannabis product would treat several qualifying conditions, including obstructive sleep apnea.

“It is administered almost like a dermal patch, but inside the nose. What we can do is we can deliver a very set amount over a set period of time,” says Michael Johnson, CEO of Rhinomed. “And because it is going directly into the blood, into your circulatory system, we can actually use a much lower amount to achieve a clinical outcome than if you were to swallow it.”

This could offer an alternative to CPAP therapy. “That’s really interesting to us because certainly compliance rates with CPAP are under 40%. It’s an expensive therapy, patients don’t really like it, and yet there’s been no innovation in the sector for a long time,” says Johnson. “Here is an opportunity, potentially, to create a whole new mode of therapy that actually doesn’t treat the symptom of sleep apnea, but actually goes to ask the question: What is the underlying cause, what is the underlying reason why people have apnea?”

References

1. Ramar K, Rosen IM, Kirsch DB, et al. Medical Cannabis and the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An American Academy of Sleep Medicine Position Statement. J Clin Sleep Med. 2018 Apr 15;14(4):679-81.

2. Minnesota Department of Health. Issue Brief on Obstructive Sleep Apnea. 2017 Sept. Available at www.health.state.mn.us/topics/cannabis/rulemaking/sleepapneabrief.pdf.

3. Carley DW, Prasad B, Reid KJ, et al. Pharmacotherapy of apnea by cannabimimetic enhancement, the PACE clinical trial: effects of dronabinol in obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep. 2018 Jan 1;41(1).

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JADEO Health & Wellness 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


Why Lack Of Sleep Is Bad For Your Health

Many effects of a lack of sleep, such as feeling grumpy and not working at your best, are well known. But did you know that sleep deprivation can also have profound consequences on your physical health?

One in 3 of us suffers from poor sleep, with stress, computers and taking work home often blamed.

However, the cost of all those sleepless nights is more than just bad moods and a lack of focus.

Regular poor sleep puts you at risk of serious medical conditions, including obesity, heart disease and diabetes – and it shortens your life expectancy.

It's now clear that a solid night's sleep is essential for a long and healthy life.

How much sleep do we need?

Most of us need around 8 hours of good-quality sleep a night to function properly – but some need more and some less. What matters is that you find out how much sleep you need and then try to achieve it.

As a general rule, if you wake up tired and spend the day longing for a chance to have a nap, it's likely that you're not getting enough sleep.

A variety of factors can cause poor sleep, including health conditions such as sleep apnoea. But in most cases, it's due to bad sleeping habits.

What happens if I don't sleep?

Everyone's experienced the fatigue, short temper and lack of focus that often follow a poor night's sleep.

An occasional night without sleep makes you feel tired and irritable the next day, but it won't harm your health.

After several sleepless nights, the mental effects become more serious. Your brain will fog, making it difficult to concentrate and make decisions. You'll start to feel down, and may fall asleep during the day. Your risk of injury and accidents at home, work and on the road also increases.

If it continues, lack of sleep can affect your overall health and make you prone to serious medical conditions, such as obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes.

Here are 7 ways in which a good night's sleep can boost your health:

1. Sleep boosts immunity

If you seem to catch every cold and flu that's going around, your bedtime could be to blame. Prolonged lack of sleep can disrupt your immune system, so you're less able to fend off bugs.

2. Sleep can slim you

Sleeping less may mean you put on weight! Studies have shown that people who sleep less than 7 hours a day tend to gain more weight and have a higher risk of becoming obese than those who get 7 hours of slumber.

It's believed to be because sleep-deprived people have reduced levels of leptin (the chemical that makes you feel full) and increased levels of ghrelin (the hunger-stimulating hormone).

3. Sleep boosts mental wellbeing

Given that a single sleepless night can make you irritable and moody the following day, it's not surprising that chronic sleep debt may lead to long-term mood disorders like depression and anxiety.

When people with anxiety or depression were surveyed to calculate their sleeping habits, it turned out that most of them slept for less than 6 hours a night.

4. Sleep prevents diabetes

Studies have suggested that people who usually sleep less than 5 hours a night have an increased risk of developing diabetes.

It seems that missing out on deep sleep may lead to type 2 diabetes by changing the way the body processes glucose, which the body uses for energy.

5. Sleep increases sex drive

Men and women who don't get enough quality sleep have lower libidos and less of an interest in sex, research suggests.

Men who suffer from sleep apnoea – a disorder in which breathing difficulties lead to interrupted sleep – also tend to have lower testosterone levels, which can lower libido.

6. Sleep wards off heart disease

Long-standing sleep deprivation seems to be associated with increased heart rate, an increase in blood pressure and higher levels of certain chemicals linked with inflammation, which may put extra strain on your heart.

7. Sleep increases fertility

Difficulty conceiving a baby has been claimed as one of the effects of sleep deprivation, in both men and women. Apparently, regular sleep disruptions can cause trouble conceiving by reducing the secretion of reproductive hormones.

How to catch up on lost sleep

If you don't get enough sleep, there's only one way to compensate – getting more sleep.

It won't happen with a single early night. If you've had months of restricted sleep, you'll have built up a significant sleep debt, so expect recovery to take several weeks.

Starting on a weekend, try to add on an extra hour or 2 of sleep a night. The way to do this is to go to bed when you're tired, and allow your body to wake you in the morning (no alarm clocks allowed!).

Expect to sleep for upwards of 10 hours a night at first. After a while, the amount of time you sleep will gradually decrease to a normal level.

Don't rely on caffeine or energy drinks as a short-term pick-me-up. They may boost your energy and concentration temporarily, but can disrupt your sleep patterns even further in the long term.

Source: National Health Service UK

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JADEO Health & Wellness 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


Can CBD Help You Sleep Better? How CBD Treats Insomnia (VIDEO)

We love the way Thomas DeLauer discusses CBD and sleep, and breaks down how CBD treats sleep disorders like insomnia.

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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

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  • From 22

    Good info...

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JADEO Health & Wellness 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


11 Tips For Healthy Sleep

Healthy sleep habits can make a big difference in your quality of life. Having healthy sleep habits is often referred to as having good sleep hygiene. In an effort to achieve good sleep hygiene and get a good nights rest, try to maintain following sleep practices on a consistent basis:

1. Stick to a sleep schedule of the same bedtime and wake up time, even on the weekends.

This helps to regulate your body's clock and could help you fall asleep and stay asleep for the night.

2. Practice a relaxing bedtime ritual.

A relaxing, routine activity right before bedtime conducted away from bright lights helps separate your sleep time from activities that can cause excitement, stress or anxiety which can make it more difficult to fall asleep, get sound and deep sleep or remain asleep.

3. If you have trouble sleeping, avoid naps, especially in the afternoon.

Power napping may help you get through the day, but if you find that you can't fall asleep at bedtime, eliminating even short catnaps may help.

4. Exercise daily.

Vigorous exercise is best, but even light exercise is better than no activity. Exercise at any time of day, but not at the expense of your sleep.

5. Evaluate your room.

Design your sleep environment to establish the conditions you need for sleep. Your bedroom should be cool –between 60 and 67 degrees. Your bedroom should also be free from any noise that can disturb your sleep. Finally, your bedroom should be free from any light. Check your room for noises or other distractions. This includes a bed partner's sleep disruptions such as snoring. Consider using blackout curtains, eye shades, ear plugs, "white noise" machines, humidifiers, fans and other devices.

6. Sleep on a comfortable mattress and pillows.

Make sure your mattress is comfortable and supportive. The one you have been using for years may have exceeded its life expectancy – about 9 or 10 years for most good quality mattresses. Have comfortable pillows and make the room attractive and inviting for sleep but also free of allergens that might affect you and objects that might cause you to slip or fall if you have to get up

7. Use bright light to help manage your circadian rhythms.

Avoid bright light in the evening and expose yourself to sunlight in the morning. This will keep your circadian rhythms in check.

8. Avoid alcohol, cigarettes, and heavy meals in the evening.

Alcohol, cigarettes and caffeine can disrupt sleep. Eating big or spicy meals can cause discomfort from indigestion that can make it hard to sleep. If you can, avoid eating large meals for two to three hours before bedtime. Try a light snack 45 minutes before bed if you’re still hungry.

9. Wind down.

Your body needs time to shift into sleep mode, so spend the last hour before bed doing a calming activity such as reading. For some people, using an electronic device such as a laptop can make it hard to fall asleep, because the particular type of light emanating from the screens of these devices is activating to the brain. If you have trouble sleeping, avoid electronics before bed or in the middle of the night.

10. If you can't sleep, go into another room and do something relaxing until you feel tired.

It is best to take work materials, computers and televisions out of the sleeping environment. Use your bed only for sleep and sex to strengthen the association between bed and sleep. If you associate a particular activity or item with anxiety about sleeping, omit it from your bedtime routine.

11. If you’re still having trouble sleeping

Don’t hesitate to speak with your doctor or to find a sleep professional. You may also benefit from recording your sleep in a Sleep Diary to help you better evaluate common patterns or issues you may see with your sleep or sleeping habits.

Source: The National Sleep Foundation

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Stay Informed. Stay Healthy.
#WeAreJADEO

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  • From Burge

    Wow, this is great. I need to follow some of these...

    • From Janelle Simone

      Agreed!

JADEO Health & Wellness 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


The Science Of Smell In A Good Night’s Sleep

Sleep hygiene is a concept that is getting more attention in recent years, something that can play a key role for insomnia sufferers in getting a good night’s sleep. As we all know, getting a good night’s sleep is key to being able to focus during the day, so we wanted to do a deeper dive into the nuances of herbal medicine to support JADEO readers on their quest for deep, therapeutic rest!

Sleep experts typically recommend creating a soothing sleep environment devoid of electronic distractions, avoiding caffeine and other stimulants in the hours before bed, and establishing a nighttime routine. These habits can all help you achieve that sought after well-rested feeling in the morning.

Our recent deep dive into cannabinoids for sleep illuminated the role of CBN, a little-known cannabinoid with medically identified sedative effects. Because a good night’s rest is so important for overall health and healing, we wanted to explore further and look at what other herbal therapies go hand in hand with cannabis for sleep?

Best Terpenes For A Calming, Sedating Effect


The tweet from Green Relief is true! Scientists are working to demystify the effects of terpenes on properties of cannabis, and as they uncover more of the connection between the scent profiles and powers of the plant, we can use their findings to select the best weed strains for sleep.

First, you may be wondering - what are terpenes?

Terpenes can be defined as “any of a large group of volatile unsaturated hydrocarbons found in the essential oils of plants, especially conifers and citrus trees” and can be found in the same glands that produce THC and CBD.

Female cannabis plants, especially, produce trichomes (the small fuzzy and crystal-like) hairs found on buds, which produce THC, CBD, flavonoids, and terpenes.

Terpenes, not only give your smoke its aroma and colour, but terpenes are also known to have a variety of medicinal attributes that are anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory and can benefit people suffering from the likes of asthma, depression, chronic pain, and much more.

While we are discovering that a range of terpenes are good for anxiety or nervousness, one particular terpene, called myrcene, is known to have a sedating effect which is helpful to induce sleep. Also found in mangos, lemongrass and thyme - it’s benefits include pain reduction, relief from inflammation and antioxidant properties.

Best Essential Oils For Sleep + Relaxation

As mentioned, the terpenes in cannabis are found in the essential oils of many other plants. Many of these plants have had traditional medicinal uses for hundreds of years. Some of these traditional medicinal uses include calming or sleep-inducing effects. Some of the popular favourites are found in lavender, chamomile, ylang-ylang, neroli, and cedarwood.

Best Herbal Teas or Tinctures For Sleep

Not surprisingly using many of the same herbs in teas and tinctures can also help lull you to sleep. In addition to common herbs lavender and chamomile, we suggest strong herbs that may not have as pleasing aromatic profiles, such as passionflower, valerian or hops to help knock you out. Both infusing herbs as a tea or taking them orally as a potent extraction (tincture) are wonderful ways to use the power of natural medicine to guide the body to a restful state. Combining the powers of herbal medicine with optimal sleep hygiene practices should send you well on your way to restful zzzs.


Remember to always consult a medical professional before starting any new health care regimen.

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#WeAreJADEO

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  • From 22

    Absolutely

JADEO Health & Wellness 2 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


Cannabis And Sleep: Is CDB And/Or THC The Answer To Your Sleep Woes?

It’s an issue that affects us all; quality and duration of sleep. Whether you’re a busy 9-5er, a relaxed retiree or anywhere in between, it can be hard to get your recommended seven hours a day. While humans have been using puffs of Indica's to help lull into a bedtime slumber for thousands of years, new medical research is beginning to back that adding cannabis as a sleep aid has the potential to help with any short-term sleep troubles.

While we know certain strains of cannabis can be used as a sedative and sleep agent, the jury is still out on what formulation uniquely treats difficulty sleeping. THC and CBD have alternating effects on sleep depending on dosage. Anecdotal and research evidence hasn’t given us great guidelines on exact measured milligram levels, although a 1:1 mixture of both has been shown to have maximum sleep benefit in people suffering from chronic pain, according to a 2017 review on the role of cannabinoids in sleep disorders.

Less Isn't Always More

Based on the research that has been done so far, there is counter-intuitive information that shows you can be fooled by common assumptions around cannabis and sleep. For example, high dose CBD has been shown to help with sleep, but low dose CBD has been shown to have stimulant effects. Studies in both humans and mice which administered lower doses of CBD demonstrated increased wakefulness. Another study of medical cannabis users found that users treating insomnia were more likely to use high dose CBD strains. More research needs to be done on exact dosing, but these insights can bring medical cannabis consumers the insight needed to use CBD effectively for a good night's sleep.

Know Your Cannabinoids

Researcher Dr. Evan Russo identified sedative effects in the cannabinoid known as cannabinol (CBN), which is found in smokable flower in increasing concentrations over time through the oxidation of THC. She argues that the sativa and indica designations are useless, and recommends focusing on cannabinoid content instead - promoting the quest for higher levels of CBN in a strain designated for sleep.

Watch Your Tolerance

Sleep latency is a key benefit of cannabis for sleep, meaning it can help you fall asleep more quickly, and stay asleep longer. Short-term cannabis use can help you fall asleep faster, but for some people, that’s not always the case. Some early studies point to the development of tolerance to the sedative effects in some people who report long-term cannabis usage.

Practice Makes Perfect?

Different modes of ingestion yield different effects, so consider trying an oil and a flower vape while you test out what works best for you. We know that in general, ingesting cannabis orally has a prolonged, body-high effect that is uneven in onset, while inhaling cannabis has a more immediate and pronounced impact on your body. Personalized treatment for sleep, as with any condition, is the best way to achieve optimal results.

So, does cannabis improve or cure sleep deficiencies? The verdict is still officially out on that as more research needs to be done. However, current research does prove it can provide some relief to a number of individuals.

Remember to always consult a medical professional before starting any new health care regimen.

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Stay Informed. Stay Healthy

#WeAreJADEO

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  • From Romes_416

    It helps me sleep for sure!

JADEO Health & Wellness 2 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


Cannabis And Fitness: The Real Deal

The stoner stereotype is slowly being blazed away as a new image of cannabis is emerging, one which can be linked to an active, healthy life. JADEO wanted to explore the relationship between cannabis and fitness for our readers so we took a look at what the research says and new, emerging best practice trends.

Remembering that the role of the endocannabinoid system is to achieve homeostasis and balance, it makes perfect sense that cannabis would be used as a natural health and wellness tool, but the stigmas around cannabis use may make us second guess it’s place in fitness. In fact, it can provide energy, endurance, pain relief from a sports injury, and can speed up muscle recovery. When using cannabis for its medicinal properties, it’s important to remember that it’s best consumed in conjunction with exercise, clean food, proper rest, meditation and self-care.

Cannabis and Sports Medicine

As we develop a new understanding of cannabis and health, we should consider the shift it has undergone in sports-related industries. The old and new attitudes of cannabis’ place in sports medicine reflect this shift, asking us to consider why athletes use it?

Once on the “prohibited list” of the The World Anti-Doping Agency, cannabidiol (CBD) was removed from the list in 2018 as a response to current scientific knowledge citing CBD’s benefits for pain and anxiety and the input of various stakeholders. As the leader in establishing standards for athletes regarding the use of performance-enhancing substances during competition, the lift of a 14-year long ban on any form of cannabis in competitive sports is paving the way for many professional athletes to acknowledge cannabis use in their career.

Cannabis can offer athletes relief from chronic and acute pain without subjecting them to the liver toxicity of anti-inflammatory meds or the addiction of opiate pain relievers. We now see the celebrity of athletes who are public about their use of cannabis helping to remove the negative stigmas associated with its use in sports. In fact, the NFL has publicly stated that cannabis for pain management deserves further research because it works so well anecdotally. NBA players have publicly stated that more than 80 percent of current players use cannabis for relief. NFL players have quoted stats around 89 percent.

With this kind of known presence in professional sports, we see how industry can shift common perception and invite cannabis into the wellbeing of professional athletes and give way for it in the fitness space. As we’ve transitioned into legalization, we’ve seen more sports aligned brands bring cannabis into the picture. For those of us who are not high-performance athletes, are we able to reap the same benefits? What can it offer the average individual who is looking to be active and mindful of their wellbeing?

Cannabis for Energy + focus

One of cannabis’ powerful effects is in heightening senses, but the high associated with the plant can be somewhat of a deterrent when wanting to be active and clear minded. So if you’re wondering how you can enhance your exercise routines with cannabis but not get high, the secret is in microdosing. That’s right, microdosing is defined by consuming a small, measured dose of cannabis at separate intervals that allows you to keep a sustained effect. Some athletes microdose pre-workout to bring a state of relaxation and focus to their training routine without getting high. In this relaxed mental state, anxiety and negative thinking recede and limitations are reduced, aiding at getting in “the zone.”

Many Canadians thoughtfully consume cannabis leading up to a workout with the intention of improving the overall experience. Cannabis is known to enhance the mind/body/nature connection, often providing us with a boost of inspiration which can help with our motivation before and during a workout. The most common applications would be low dose cannabis oil drops under the tongue or vaporizing a Sativa-dominant hybrid with a flower vaporizer.

Taking this approach requires the cannabis user to see cannabis as an enabler, and to thoughtfully choose strains that will boost energy and bring focus. People will usually choose a Sativa strain before a workout while relying on an Indica-dominant strain for more low-impact activities like yoga.

Cannabis for pain relief + muscle recovery

Further cannabis dosing helps reduce the inflammation and associated pain with sports injuries or soreness, after your workout. Since cannabis is a known analgesic, it is great for pain relief. This therapeutic benefit can be of assistance with muscle recovery and CBD, which is present in some ratio with THC in each strain is able to reduce inflammation.

Although they are not yet available in the legal space in Canada, cannabis topicals are known to offer powerful help to ease sore muscles. More and more individuals are googling for simple directions on how to make their own cannabis topicals at home and finding relief in balms and salves containing cannabis.

Properties of cannabis, when applied topically, target inflammation in that area and have been dramatically effective in helping me reduce muscle recovery times. Cannabis topicals are not known to induce a high so they are an excellent way for an athlete to introduce the natural benefits of cannabis into their life.

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Stay Informed. Stay Healthy

#WeAreJADEO


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Mike Robinson Health & Wellness 3 months ago / Santa Barbara, Alberta


Judge That Jailed People Over Cannabis Is Now A Patient In Need

By: Mike Robinson

Retired Judge Admits “Throwing People In Jail” For Cannabis Haunts Him After It Saved His Life:

Now here’s a new twist. The very same judge, Doug Bench, who used to put away those with minor marijuana offence without any qualms, came forward about how Cannabis saved his life in order to help the people of Florida and beyond learn the truth about prohibition. The success stories regarding cannabis are seemingly endless, and the medicinal properties of this plant when properly administered have proven to to have a tremendously positive effect on our health, so much that the healthcare and pharmaceutical industry could eventually be partially replaced – especially many of our prescription drugs. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing with knowledge we’ve all gained on both prescription drugs, which experts say in studies kill more than 100,000 people annually in the US alone, and the conventional treatments for Cancer and other illnesses that seem to make many of us even sicker than we were – or worse. When this former Judge found out that he could benefit from what he used to demonize? His mind changed quickly when his own life was on the line and that led to being a huge voice in the Florida push for approval of use of the whole plant without extensive restrictions.

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This whole recovery and this judge who has came forward in such a positive manner is a great example of a change in perspective, and in his case, a major paradigm shift. Something he once believed to be true was no longer true because of his own experience in dealing with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. In the video below, he admits to throwing hundreds of people in jail for using this plant because “At the time I thought it was the right thing to do.”

When Bench was diagnosed with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, or COPD, which can result in a slow and painful death, his life was saved after realizing the benefits of cannabis in treating his disease. Now, Bench has made it his life’s work to wake people up to the “70 years of lies” the US government has told the citizens about marijuana.

With so many fighting for their freedom across the country this is an amazing thing to see, and it doesn’t stop here – many others are reporting on Judge Doug Bench. Cannabis Health Radio did a special on this in mid 2017 in the push for the State’s full legalization of Cannabis.

Watch two videos on this here:

As A Judge He Put People In Jail For Cannabis, Now He Needs It and Talks on YouTube

The Judge Talks On Video

Prior to this 2018, the state of Florida was regarded as one of the worst possible states to be caught in possession of cannabis. According to a 2009 analysis by former NORML Director Jon Gettman, no state in this country punished people more severely for minor marijuana offenses than Florida. However, thanks in part to a former Florida judge, all this is gradually changing,

The huge American cannabis crop makes the growth Industry only 2nd to corn. That’s a huge move in such a short time. With former judges, athletes, Hollywood stars, and even lawmakers stepping forward for Cannabis – it seems the momentum just won’t stop. For us patients that’s a must. We need every last person like Former Judge Doug Bench to come forward and speak.

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This story has moved around a bit with not too much attention by the media and I’ve yet to blog on it. I thought it was very worthy after reviewing it today and thinking of all the people I know that have had to go to jail over the plant. Sitting here pondering the countless times in the past we did this or did that running compassion programs and so much more – it’s a wonder many of us didn’t end up in more trouble and sentenced by a Judge, who like Doug Bench, would someday need the very plant they saw as evil and put someone behind bars for.

I’m thankful for Doug Bench and hope more like him step up to the plate and admit they were wrong. Admit that the people are right and that we’ve been dealt with unjustly by a government that seems to do no wrong while it’s people die needing a plant that they have a patent on. There’s no smooth way to go around that fact.

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Many are learning the truth and the more we hear from patients like ourselves and people that support us, the better off we are.

Mike Robinson, Medicinal Cannabis Patient and Former Director, The American Academy of Cannabinoid Medicine. Founder, Global Cannabinoid Research Center

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Mike Robinson CBD 3 months ago / Santa Barbara, Alberta


Treating M.S. With Cannabis Oil & CBD

The Many Wonders Of Cannabis:

By: Mike Robinson, Medicinal Cannabis Patient,

Within the medical cannabis community, patients with MS are beginning to appear, talking it up and telling their stories about how the plant has drastically helped their disease, bringing glimmers of hope to those that definitely did not see light before and furthermore opening the eyes of families and friends. Additionally, although some conventional medical treatments can assist with certain forms of Multiple Sclerosis, the symptoms of this condition can sometimes not be effectively assisted by pharmaceuticals leaving patients wanting an alternative, more natural method of soothing these painful and often debilitating symptoms. This is where the cannabis plant can play a role in changing a life like no pharmaceutical maker could ever dream of, at least not those of the 20th century. But one thing many don't consider is the judgment that people endure even after much of the world and most of the U.S. has legalized it in some form or another.

Andrew is one of those patients. He's 22 and lives in Newark, N.J. and is the boyfriend of an individual that's followed for a few years on social media. It was beyond humbling to receive his emailed testimony and to find that input given during transit made such a difference for him. "When I first started using the plant it was CBD only because that's all I could get," Andy went on to tell me a whole lot more,"When I realized this plant could make me walk again now that's when I got very serious about it and started asking everyone I knew until I found someone that was growing. It was really scary at first with all of it. I felt like hiding that I was high until my girlfriend started using the term medicated. I felt like I was doing something wrong by smoking it and vaping it. I didn't know what to do, I was torn but had to keep using it because I want my life back. As a kid I would run all over the playground and then suddenly life changed. I had no idea what the doctors were talking about as a child but when I hit puberty I was already using a walker and a wheelchair. I knew that I was much more than different, I knew that my life was gone before it started. Depression probably was the worst part of it all."

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"Then I started using more of the different oils friends would make and found even more relief but it didn't feel right when I'd go to church or go someplace where my friends were that didn't approve of weed. It seemed like all I would hear was that, why am I smoking weed? And to me it was so easy to give the answer that made sense but nobody wanted to hear it. I felt like screaming and crying, these are feelings I'm not used to at all. It didn't matter what people said I continued using it. It's been nearly 2 years now and I'm walking. No more wheelchair and no more pain. So many foul words have came through my mind as I thought of all the judgement from the many people that couldn't understand why suddenly I was smoking pot. Then my girlfriend told me she'd been following this man online that worked for an Academy all about Cannabinoids. It was the first time I ever heard of the word Cannabinoid. Then that night it felt like I was in a college class as Mike taught me from a train. A man on a train in California taught me how to medicate differently than I was. He taught me to ingest a lot more than I was and it's changed the way I feel. The pain level has reduced. Learning to add the CBD after the THC makes me a little too medicated works really good. Whoever taught him, I am thankful for. This plant, CBD and THC and all the other wonderful parts of it, I am very thankful for. I can walk again."

WOW!!

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I am extremely thankful for Dennis Peron, RIP, the Godfather of Cannabis, co-author and huge name behind California's 1996 Proposition 215 the first legalization of medicinal cannabis anywhere on the globe since prohibition. Dennis was an extremely humble man that shared a very personal lesson with me that I'll never forget "Mike, compassion doesn't always mean convenience, nobody ever left the buyers club without a joint." Meeting Dennis and spending time with him while writing the "Peron Resolution" which requested the end of the prohibition of gifting of Cannabis in California left memories that last a lifetime regardless of the current veto by California State Gov. Jerry Brown of The Compassion Act that would have restored the gifting of the precious plant. Voters in the state went after Proposition 64 thinking it was the end of prohibition and like most voting booths people don't spend the time nor have the time to read excessive language. Most California voters were left in a shell shock state of mind when they found out they voted for legalizing getting high (which in Ca. seemed legal already) while outlawing the giving away of oils to save dying peoples lives. "All for the love of money, I'm just an old gay hippie, why should they listen to me?" Dennis told me near the end of his life in December 2017. A man that stayed humble the entire time, a man that never stepped away from compassion regardless of how the world treated him or his idea of freeing us all from the holds of a government that want's to see us perish instead of heal with the plant. Some days the 100's or even 1000's of messages that come through are so overwhelming. Trying to manage multiple phone numbers and so many people that need information and help sometimes gets frustrating until an email like this one comes through. Then it reminds me of Dennis and how he lived in the small room at the bottom of the Castro Castle. Humble.

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Exactly what is M.S.?

Multiple Sclerosis is a complex and multidimensional medical condition, that impacts each and every individual in a completely different manner. There is no official cure for MS, although some conventional medical treatments do exist to slow down or even dissolve negative impacts produced by the condition. These specific treatments will be discussed in further detail later on in this article. Even if the effects of MS can manifest in various ways, what is happening deeper within the body is always the same or similar, leading to a variety of outcomes because of one process.

What is occurring within when MS strikes, is primarily centered within the brain and spinal cord and their ability to receive signals and be properly supported by well functioning central nervous system. This results in challenges throughout many aspects of day to day life, because the central nervous system is so vital to human functions, making it possible for humans to do basic activities like walking, all the way to solving a complex problem.

Multiple Sclerosis Strains

Patients suffering from MS typically have a form of the condition that is categorized into four different groups; with symptoms that are either long lasting or temporary. The majority of patients fall underneath the temporary category, which is defined as relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), and involves obvious attacks that seem to have frequent shifts, where remissions are often experienced between attacks and full recoveries often made, only for another attack to follow some time after. This form of MS has some conventional treatments available to assist with stabilization of the symptoms.

The next type of MS is known as clinically isolated MS (CIS), and is somewhat of the preliminary stage to a possible MS diagnosis. Someone given the label CIS must experience symptoms for 24 hours, and they may either go on to make a full recovery, or end up with an official MS diagnosis. Not all who experience CIS end up developing an official diagnosis.

The third classification of Multiple Sclerosis, is known as primary progressive MS (PPMS), and is usually a worsening in symptoms, specifically ones that create disabilities for an individual, as well as a lack of regular relapse and recovery, because the symptoms tend to appear gradually, intensifying with time.

The fourth, and final category of MS, is secondary progressive MS (SPMS), which is typically the result for patients diagnosed with RRMS as time progresses. With this form of Multiple Sclerosis, the symptoms tend to increase, and overall neurological function seems to further decline, often resulting in an even more immense worsening and shortening of periods between relapse and remission.

For those who experience little to no period of remission, such as patients diagnosed with progressive MS, must know that there is not much conventionally that can be done to improve the condition, for no medical treatments have yet been discovered, aside from one FDA approved medicine. The light at the end of the tunnel; plenty of research is constantly being conducted to discover new, effective treatments for progressive Multiple Sclerosis, so there is hope that progress will be made in the near future.

Bottom Line? Cannabis and Cannabis Oils have now treated thousands of patients globally with MS successfully! From CBD oils to THC and terpenes - the entire plant with all of it's numerous cannabinoids is truly the plant of life for all of us whether it's Cancer, MS, Epilepsy, Autism, Migraines - you name it and this plant has the answer!

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Mike Robinson, Medicinal Cannabis Patient & Cannabinoid Medicine Healthcare Consultant/Research Analyst

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JADEO Health & Wellness 3 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


Cannabis and Pain Management in the Sports World

We all know that athletes never have it easy, even if the amazing feats they accomplish always look effortless. While most of us understand how much agony athletes go through mentally, the physical pain they suffer with is sometimes worse.

Things are starting to change here in Canada and around the world. As cannabis becomes slowly more accepted into society, you're seeing more athletes turn to cannabis for pain relief (and more).

Take a look at various developments on this subject and what the future might look like in athletic training.

Athletes Are Proving Cannabis Isn't a Performance Enhancer

One thing athletes are using cannabis for is to help pain during pre and post-training. They've also proven marijuana isn't a performance-enhancing drug. If cannabis becomes fully accepted into the athletic world, officials will know it's a drug that doesn't give athletes an unfair advantage.

What it does do, is help athletes better focus on their specific sports training. Since cannabis is known to help people hone in on details, it can similarly aid in training methods.

In other words, cannabis gets an athlete's mind into a flow state for better concentration.

NFL Athletes Are Taking Cannabis As Alternative To Traditional Pain Medications

Last year, the Washington Post did a piece about NFL players taking cannabis products to relieve intense physical pain. The injuries NFL players go through is sometimes more than what the public can comprehend. Unfortunately, far too many of those athletes are given pain medications loaded with crippling side effects.

In the above piece, Eugene Monroe (a former player with the Baltimore Ravens) noted that prescription pain medications were killing him. When he started using cannabis to manage his pain, he realized he could function again and think clearer.

Despite opposition in the sports world to using cannabis on a recreational basis, this could become the tipping point to medicinal uses if carefully administered.

More Canadian Athletes Are Using Cannabis

Here in Canada, you're finding more athletes using cannabis for training. Keep in mind they can't use it during competition because it's on the World Anti-Doping Agency's (WADA) prohibited list.

Even so, many athletes here are using it for more than just training purposes. Some are using it as a sleep aid to ensure better rest during training and before major competitions.

Plus, they're using it to help them with pain during recovery. Training intensely can sometimes lead to physical pains that cannabis helps manage temporarily.

Most think that despite cannabis being legal here, it won't have any impact on having it removed from the drug list at WADA.

The Rise in CBD Products to Manage Athletic Pain

A way for athletes to avoid controversy consuming cannabis during training is to simply turn to CBD products. This is a great alternative to cannabis because it doesn't give you the psychoactive high marijuana does.

Coming from hemp, CBD typically comes in oil form. It's becoming more popular with athletes as a result because it also works as a pain reliever.

Not only does it help with chronic pain, but it is also said to help athletes control performance anxiety and general stress. These experiences are a big part of athletic lives due to the often insurmountable pressures they face.

Edibles Are the Most Popular Form for All-Day Relief

Athletes going through the intense physical pains are turning primarily to CBD edibles to keep the anti-pain effect sustained. Most athletes start with a 10mg dose of CBD to see how it affects their body. Then they gradually consume more throughout the day.

Other athletes who need quicker relief are turning to vaping solutions to help get the CBD into their body immediately. CBD-rich strains are the most popular, though athletes who prefer regular cannabis go for indica strains.

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If you enjoyed this article, we also recommend reading "What's The Deal with Cannabis, Opioids, and The NFL?"


Stay Informed. Stay Healthy.

#WeAreJADEO

Related comments

  • From Janelle Simone

    So many of the various sports leagues are so far behind on this.

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