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Whether it's for you or a loved one, this group is for those that are looking at cannabis as a medicine. Discuss topics from cancer to diabetes and epilepsy to parkinson's disease and share your experiences to help others dealing with conditions that may affect quality of life.

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Cannabis Wiki CBD 1 day ago / London, Ontario


CBD for fighting sleep disorders

Wanna get that good night's rest but suffering from insomnia? Well, what if there is an aid for all your sleeping disorders? CBD is a natural chemical that is found in the cannabis plant; It is a phytocannabinoid that interacts with endocannabinoid receptors in our bodies. The same receptors that are responsible for all our homeostatic functions, which can interfere with our sleep patterns!

For the full article and more check out Cannabis wiki.

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22 Medical Cannabis 1 week ago / Caledon, Ontario

https://blog.letstalkcannabis.ca/engage/why-the-cannabinoid-thcv-is-something-you-should-know-about-19662

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Why the cannabinoid, THCV, is something you should know about!

Lets Talk Cannabis

Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) is similiar to tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) but doesn't have the intoxicating effect like THC has. Despite THCV sharing a similar make-up with THC, evidence suggests that THCV interacts with the CB1 and CB2 receptors in the endocannabinoid system in a completely different way.

https://blog.letstalkcannabis.ca/engage/why-the-cannabi...

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  • From 22

    VERY, VERY ENCOURAGING!!

Cannabis Wiki Health & Wellness 2 weeks ago / London, Ontario


Are there any cannabis products for helping with social anxiety?

Most of us knows how it feels to be socially awkward, whether its feeling uncomfortable in a room full of people or getting sweaty upon making a presentation or even clammed up in a social situation. Well, what if we help to ease that discomfort? Research is proving that cannabis is effective for relieving anxiety, and with the correct strain, you'll be able to show up and show out in a room full of people.

For the full guide and more, check out Cannabis Wiki.

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  • From Janelle Simone

    Super important topic!

Mike Robinson Medical Cannabis 2 weeks ago / Santa Barbara, Alberta


Katree Saunders: A Cannabis Industry Professional Talks

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She's Heading To D.C. To Speak!

Katree Darriel Saunders of Las Vegas has an intense story that would take a book to truly tell. She treats a plethora of health issues with medicinal cannabis and has been featured in multiple publications for her advocacy and lobbying work for patient rights with Americans for Safe Access and NORML. Many patients have a history like hers that includes being tricked into going jail by a deceptive DEA agent – literally incarcerated for possession of a small amount of hash and cannabis. That Nevada sting operation cost her several months of her life - behind bars. In her past she gained momentum at first as a patients rights advocate way back in 2010 when she volunteered for ‘Organizing America’ – a political event in which President Obama spoke about healthcare reform. After being chosen to be on stage and being sat behind him, she shook his hand and had a brief exchange with the president in which Saunders said “We needed to talk about medical patient’s rights.’” She states her responded with “We’re not prosecuting.”

A beyond exciting occurrence for someone who’s been behind bars for possessing the plant – an ability to confront the president about the freedom for all to use what many of us already do on a daily basis. Even though the state of Nevada has made it difficult for her to work, she still is going at it and on her way to Washington DC in days to speak on patients behalf at the NORML conference and congressional lobby day. “I’ve worked in the Industry for years, but now the state doesn’t want to allow a felon to hold a cannabis card or be in the industry. With the new legalization laws across the nation expunging records, patients like myself need freedom. It’s not easy to work in the industry as it is, there’s many false hopes and promises unfulfilled. I have my share of good stories and also bad experiences.”

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(Saunders in 2010 in her meet and greet with President Obama, which was covered by C-Span)

As a patient she’s very complex and has quite the detailed history. I did a brief interview that goes much further into the why and hows of her medicinal cannabis journey. She was featured in Vegas Cannabis Magazine as a veteran of the industry with extensive knowledge in helping patients learn about the synergistic relationship of cannabinoids, terpenes, and cannabis products. James Priest of Emerald Magazine did an entire story on her called “My Bust” that’s very interesting, it’s pertaining to the Sting operation that she was caught up in. I’ve had the pleasure of meeting Katree at conferences in Las Vegas, she speaks at local events and more – as well as making waves across social media in regards to patient access, rights, and more. Let’s have a look at how she responded to my own questions for her about her personal use of cannabis and CBD…

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How did you find out about medicinal cannabis or CBD? “I started using cannabis at 16 after a slip and fall at work at McDonald’s and hurting my back. I didn’t find out about CBD until about 2008- 2009 and then started using that too. Cannabis was what helped me get off opioids and benzo’s, it keeps me off of pharmaceuticals.”

What are you treating, can you tell me how the health issue effects you?

“I’m treating fibromyalgia, chronic pain, nerve damage, carpal tunnel, and ruptured disc in my back and neck – spondylosis . As well, I have Hidradenitis suppurativa, PTSD , anxiety from being a prisoner of war. My health issues affect me severely every day. I need foot surgery as I walk on a broken foot that never healed – part of the injuries I sustained in a motor vehicle accident back when I was pre trial. My doctor ended up dying and I had to find a new doctor and get all new medical records. They want to take bone from my hip to fix my foot. Cannabis helps with the chronic pain and neuropathy issues.”

How do you use/consume medicinal cannabis? “I use cannabis flower smoked and vaped, topical products of all types, cannabis oils ingested with specific terpenes that help with pain and inflammation. I look for strains or oils high in a-pinene, myrcene, bisabolol, and linalool. I use all the cannabinoids I can. Especially THC, CBN, CBG, CBC, and of course CBD. They all help the situation – they ease my pain and reduce swelling. When I was working I was using over 4 grams of THC Cannabis oil a week and about 1000 mg of CBD. I make a lot of my own medicine with the magical butter machine. I’d like to thank Garyn from there!”

What type of reaction do you get from friends and family about using Cannabis? “At first people just thought that I was trying to get high, but after CBD got legal people understand now. It’s medicine and I’m using it for pain relief so it’s not as bad as it once was – now they all call me for advice!”

Did you take pharmaceutical medications – if so, has cannabis decreased this? “I am five years pill free from opiates and benzo’s due to medical cannabis, it replaced the pills.”

What else would you like to share about your journey? “As a patient, It’s hard at times to fit into the cannabis industry and keep a positive outlook. The culture of the corporations can be good but there’s many vultures as well. Knowing that the plant didn’t do anything wrong and it shouldn’t be illegal helps me get through it – patients need to talk and those that can should be voices for others. Not all have the right reasons for being in the cannabis industry and some of us are doing it to heal from much more than our illnesses. I’ve had issues in the past in trying to further myself, but I believe many have. I’m just trying to help the community and hope that the industry follows the patients lead.”

What advice would you give to those considering trying out plant medicine like this, but waiting to get more information? “Your body has an Endocannabinoid system that works synergistic with the cannabinoids found in the plant as well as specific terpenes (that come from the plant) to help with pain and inflammation. There’s so much the plant’s medicine can do for people beyond that, education goes along way.”

How is your life now after you’ve discovered how to heal/treat yourself differently. Has your activity level increased? “I can now enjoy my life and my children a lot more and the pain hasn’t subsided but it’s manageable due to cannabis for a much longer extended time relief than opiates and benzo’s every did. Being happy and positive about the future is priceless and cannabis gives me my life back to do so. Being able to teach others about cannabis education and the health benefits is healing in itself.”

What myth about Cannabis do you believe needs to be squashed? “That is a harmful substance, it’s a beautiful plant from God that is here to nourish us just as we need nourishment for our other organs. Our cannabinoid receptors, CB one and two, need to be nourished as well by the cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant.”

If you could send a message, any message, to the world – what would it be? “We need to end federal cannabis prohibition so people can have safe access to this life giving plant. Give cannabis a chance – it’ll bring your body back into homeostasis without the horrible side effects of pharmaceutical medication. God gave us an Endocannabinoid system that should be nourished and the cannabis plant does that synergistically speaking.”

Have your kids benefited from your use of Cannabis, has it enabled you as a Mom? "It allows me to be a better parent, without my health I'm not able to care for them as well, this would go for anyone treating an illness. My son Josiah uses CBD for migraines - he's almost 13. My oldest Ian is 19, and Azariah is 7, my kids are aware mom uses natural medicine. They all benefit from their mom having the freedom to use the plant instead of pills."

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Reading the links in this story gives one a mini series of the life of a cannabis patient that gets caught with a small amount of it in a state with very strict laws. Since legalization many have been waiting for changes in their state that includes the release of people in prison for convictions like hers as well as expunging of past criminal records related to cannabis possession or even growing it. Many are like Katree are waiting for this to be done federally so that people across America have the ability to speak out. You can contact her on Facebook or LinkedIn if you’d like to help her in the lobbying endeavors or are looking for someone to represent your company in the industry.

Mike Robinson, Medicinal Cannabis Patient. Founder, Global Cannabinoid Research Center. But, most of all, Genevieve’s Daddy https://www.mikesmedicines.com/medical-marijuana/the-cannabis-love-story/

Cover photo credit: Michael W. Rogers

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  • From BahaqueenM

    quite a story!

JADEO Medical Cannabis 2 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


Cannabis: A New Way to Treat Fibromyalgia and Diabetic Nerve Pain?

An estimated 1.5% of adults of the household population of Canada suffers from Fibromyalgia, a chronic disorder that includes symptoms like widespread joint and muscle pain, fatigue and cognitive difficulties. Also consider, that more than 3.4 million Canadians have diabetes, and more than half of them will have some form of nerve damage as a result. These illnesses are described as invisible diseases because their painful effects are not seen by the naked eye. For many diagnosed with these painful chronic illnesses, the medication prescribed has more negative effects than positive.

There's a new treatment worth considering - Cannabis. With its decriminalization, we are now seeing it become more of a key player in the medical community. Cannabis is now the new medicinal hope for many suffering from chronic ailments.

What is the Cannabis Patch?

The Cannabis Patch has been developed by Cannabis Science, Inc. There are 2 patches targeted at managing Fibromyalgia, and Diabetic Nerve Pain. The patches applied to the surface of the skin, provide a slow, controlled dose of the cannabinoid best known as CBD. While the same technology, each patch is designed to best treat the effects of the specific disease they target. The interesting fact to note here is that patch opts to use CBD and not its more popular sister THC.

Mary's Medicinals was first to market with the Cannabis patch, but not as a treatment for specific illnesses. They simply offer controlled doses of CBD, THC, or THC & CBD combined for any particular use.

So What Exactly is CBD?

CBD (Cannabidiol) is one of the most prevalent cannabinoids found in Cannabis. Only second to THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol). It packs many amazing health benefits. It’s most attractive being that it does not contain the psychoactive component that THC does. In other words, you can reap many of the amazing health benefits of Cannabis minus the high.

Known benefits of CBD include;

  • It works as an anti-inflammatory.
  • Reduces pain.
  • May reduce seizures and other neurological disorders.
  • Reduces the effects of anxiety disorder.
  • Promotes a feeling of calm and relaxation

What does this have to do with Fibromyalgia and Diabetic Nerve Pain?

The controlled release of CBD from the Cannabis patch is considered an amazing treatment for the diseases as it reduces the inflammation associated with the illnesses. By reducing the inflammation the CBD also minimizes the pain as it is usually one of the main causes of the pain. CBD is also a natural pain reliever and can reduce any other forms of pain associated with these diseases.

Research is already proving Cannabis to be a more effective treatment method for Fibromyalgia symptoms. In a 2014 survey conducted by The Global Pain Foundation & The National Pain Report, 62% of Fibromyalgia patients who tried cannabis said it was very effective at treating their symptoms. Another 33% said it helped a little and only 5% said it did not help at all. Compare this to the fact that over 60% of respondents admitted the medication prescribed to them (Cymbalta, Lyrica, Savella) did not work at all! To be fair, please note that research on Cannabis and its health benefits is somewhat limited due to its prolonged illegal status.

We can only expect that as legalization becomes widespread that more research will be conducted. As a result, this has the potential to become a more popular form of treatment for chronic illnesses. This will be a game changer for the medical industry, as it will provide patients with a better solution for symptoms of their chronic illness.

It is important to note, that the laws for purchase and consumption methods of cannabis, including CBD, vary per country and state/province. Always ensure you know and respect the law and others.

Remember to always consult your doctor before beginning any type of wellness treatment.

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Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo

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  • From Janelle Simone

    Very interesting the different ways that cannabis can be dosed and received as a treatment. Definitely a revolutionary plant, man!

  • From 22

    Dosage control will be everything..

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JADEO Medical Cannabis 2 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


5 Ways Cannabis Is Being Used In The Field Of Mental Health

Is Cannabis Just a Hot Trend Or The Real Deal?

Cannabis is more than a trend. This tiny green plant continues to amaze the world and to be studied and tested as we explore its potential to treat a variety of mental health issues. While more extensive research is needed on how cannabis effects those suffering from mental health conditions, the results coming from some initial testing and case studies have been very promising.

The research on cannabis’s effect on mental health is leading some scientists to call for the allowance of CBD (cannabidiol) in various treatments. Many forward-thinking researchers want to see laws passed that allow CBD to be used for mental health treatment in the same way that it is currently used to treat epilepsy and the accompanying seizures experienced by those with the condition.

Let's have a look at the top trends we are seeing in the study of cannabis and how cannabis may be used to treat various mental health symptoms and diseases.

1. Cannabis and the Treatment of PTSD

Many veterans are currently using cannabis to help them deal with the symptoms that come with PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder) after returning home from service. Several states currently approve of medically prescribed cannabis as a way to treat PTSD as a specific mental health condition. While the studies of using cannabis for PTSD are not extensive, many veterans in states where it is legal are using the substance to help them cope with symptoms, including nightmares and flashbacks, that often accompany PTSD.

2. CBD and Social Anxiety

A study published in 2011 stated that there is evidence that CBD could help those who suffer from social anxiety. Participants in the study reported that they felt more at ease in social situations, such as meeting new people or speaking in public, when they were able to take limited, evenly-timed doses of CBD rather than those who did not have access to cannabis. More studies need to be done to see if these findings are substantiated.

3. CBD May Reduce General Anxiety & Panic Attacks

Many people who experience consistent anxiety and those who have panic attacks are beginning to use controlled doses of CBD to help alleviate their symptoms. CBD is believed to have an impact on brain chemistry by suppressing the hormone THC which causes anxiety and can, therefore, stimulate panic attacks. Many people who suffer from these conditions have reported that CBD eases their symptoms, including shortness of breath, chest pains, and cognitive impairments.

4. CBD and the Treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

People with OCD who regularly take small, controlled doses of CBD report feeling more relaxed and less likely to repeat obsessive behaviours. While many individuals in states with legalized cannabis report these symptoms and some of the results for these individuals have been promising, these claims are not yet substantiated by medical research. Studies have been produced that show a decrease in OCD-related behaviour in rats and mice, although no human testing has been done at this time.

5. CBD Is Showing Promise To Help Those With Schizophrenia

Research is showing that there may be some substantiated claims that CBD can be used to improve the symptoms of people living with schizophrenia. Those who tried using cannabis to help control symptoms experienced fewer hallucinations and/or delusions, less difficulty thinking/concentrating, and more motivation in their daily lives.

While this research is promising, more studies are needed to determine if CBD can be used as a treatment to help a majority of those with schizophrenia disorder.

While many of these positive correlations between the use of cannabis and improved mental health show potential, far more research needs to be done before cannabis, and more specifically CBD, is accepted in the treatment of mental health conditions. As the number of studies increase, it will be determined if these findings are substantiated to recommend cannabis as a mainstream treatment for mental health conditions.

It is important to note, that the laws for purchase and consumption methods of cannabis, including CBD, vary per country and state/province. Always ensure you know and respect the law and others.

Remember to always consult your doctor before beginning any type of wellness treatment.

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Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo

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  • From Sativasky

    I’ll be open about this, I use it to treat some mild depression from time to time, and it really gets that weight off my shoulders and let’s me relax and think about all the good that is happening in my life ❤️

JADEO Medical Cannabis 2 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


How To Talk To Your Doctor About Cannabis

Despite the fact that medicinal cannabis is legal in Canada, it can be a bit unnerving to talk to a doctor about cannabis treatments. First of all, some people still associate smoking cannabis with a negative stereotype, fuelled by misinformation and flat-out lies. The truth is, cannabis is used as an effective treatment for a wide variety of ailments from chronic pain to PTSD, many times replacing pharmaceuticals. Increasingly, medical professionals are endorsing its use and even recommend it to their patients when other options don't work. If you're considering cannabis treatments for a medical condition and you're nervous about talking to your doctor, relax. Here are a few tips that will help you get the conversation started so you can get the medicine you need.

Do Your Research

First of all, if you're not in Canada you'll want to know whether you're a resident of a medical cannabis state, or if you're barking up the wrong tree. If you're in one of the legal states, you will need to know if your condition qualifies for the medical marijuana program. For most states and in Canada, it's possible to get a medical marijuana card for certain cancers, chronic pain, and increasingly for depression, PTSD and a variety of other conditions and ailments. Keep in mind that some states allow physicians to approve cannabis use for medical conditions that aren't listed, on a case-by-case basis, so even if yours isn't listed, don't be discouraged.

Be Completely Honest

When you speak to your doctor, everything that is said between you is confidential, so be honest about your interest in cannabis treatments. If you're already consuming cannabis to help you with an illness, pain, or other issues, say so. Explain why you believe that cannabis is a viable treatment option for you, based on your own experience and research. Print out studies, and other information that you believe supports your reasoning and take it to the appointment with you. Be ready to answer questions about the frequency of your consumption, how it helps your condition, and whether you've experienced any unwanted side-effects.

Ask Lots of Questions

There are no dumb questions, especially when it comes to your personal health and well-being. If you're new to cannabis use, you may not realize that there are potential side-effects that some people encounter, so ask your doctor. Make sure you understand exactly what the risks are for you, depending on your age, other medications you're taking and your overall health. It's also a good idea to discuss how you will be consuming your cannabis. Will you be smoking, vaping or eating it? What are the potential benefits of each type of consumption and what method does the doctor recommend? If you've experimented, you'll likely have a preference, but it's always good to get a second opinion.

Don't Try To Force It

The truth is, not all medical doctors support the use of cannabis as a treatment for any diseases or conditions. This may be because of their religious beliefs, political affiliations, or personal opinions. If you're noting resistance from your doctor with regards to medical cannabis, this can be the perfect opportunity to educate them about its benefits. That being said, it can be difficult to change someone's mind, especially when they have long-held beliefs about the dangers of cannabis. If you're in this situation, remember that you do have choices and if you're not getting the cooperation you desire, it may be time to find a new doctor that's more open to alternative options for health care.

The truth is, many doctors already know that the plant offers a great deal of promise for treating a wide variety of illnesses and medical conditions. For a lot of doctors, their reservations when it comes to prescribing medicinal cannabis stem not from a lack of belief in its effectiveness, but from the scarcity of in-depth research and long-term studies on the effects and as well as how to prescribe the proper dosage. If you're considering cannabis as a treatment option, take the time to do your research, so you're prepared to ask your doctor the questions that matter most to you. If your doctor isn't agreeable, don't think you don't have a choice, you can always change doctors. It is, after all, your health and you should absolutely be in control.

Planning to discuss cannabis with your doctor? Here are 3 questions to get the conversation started.

  • Is cannabis a viable treatment for my condition?
  • Would using cannabis affect any of my other medications?
  • Are there any potential side effects?

It is important to note, that the laws for purchase and consumption methods of cannabis, including CBD, vary per country and state/province. Always ensure you know and respect the law and others.

Remember to always consult your doctor before beginning any type of wellness treatment.


Stay informed. Stay Connected.
#WeAreJadeo

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JADEO Medical Cannabis 3 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} Can Cannabis Be As Addictive As Opioids?

Curious about whether cannabis is as addictive as opioids? Watch now as Dr. Peter Blecher, Chief Medical Officer, Starseed Medicinal Inc. provides the answer.

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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

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Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo

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JADEO Medical Cannabis 3 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


Medical Cannabis In The Workplace

Canada has certainly come a long way since cannabis prohibition back in the 1920s. However, it wasn’t until recently, some 80 years after prohibition, that Health Canada allowed access to cannabis for medical purposes. Even now in 2019 with legalization, there is still an information gap and negative stigma around cannabis, and as long as it exists it could prevent millions of Canadians from properly treating their chronic pain and ailments.

Medical cannabis use in Canada is indeed rising, which is why it is important to discuss cannabis in the workplace now more than ever. Registered medical cannabis patients in Canada increased from 23,930 in 2015 to over 330,000 in 2018, a 14-times increase in just three years. Health Canada projects that number will increase to 450,000 by 2024.

With the rise of medical cannabis users and the aforementioned information gap in mind, let’s begin by clearing the air around medical cannabis with some facts.

“Medical cannabis patients are not looking to get high. They are looking to get well” - Starseed Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Peter M. Blecher.

Perhaps the most important factor skeptics need to understand is that medical cannabis can play a key role in the treatment of chronic pain. This is especially true when considering the “Chronic Pain Triad”, three interrelated pillars— pain intensity, mental health and wellness, and sleep quality. These three elements make up the basis for most chronic pain. Each of these three elements may contribute to any other two, either in an aggravating or alleviating manner. Traditional management for any of these contributing factors often involves multiple drugs daily, but medical cannabis is said to present an opportunity for individuals to treat all three elements with a single prescription, simplifying and eliminating a potentially dangerous regime of medications. It seems as though Canadian patients and prescribers rely heavily on opioids as their primary form of treatment, but in a 2017 study called Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, 80% of patients reported that cannabis by itself was more effective than their opioid treatments.

In terms of cannabis in the workplace, a recent study from Sanofi Canada Healthcare found that 64% of employees with workplace health plans agreed that ‘medical cannabis, when authorized by a physician, should be covered by their health benefit plan’. Despite this and evidence that demonstrates the beneficial use of medical cannabis in place of some prescription drugs (i.e. opioids), approximately only 4% of employers offer coverage for medical cannabis according to the HRPA (Human Resources Professionals Association). It is understood that a common factor impeding the increase in coverage for medical cannabis are regulatory roadblocks. For instance, the federal government has yet to include medical cannabis as an approved drug under the Food and Drugs act – as a result, it does not have a Drug Identification Number (DIN). These numbers, which are issued by Health Canada, which are granted by Health Canada,, indicate that a drug has been evaluated and approved by the government. Until a DIN is established, employers will find it difficult to apply traditional drug coverage for medical cannabis under their existing health benefit plans.

Understanding this treatment was vital for many to live a healthier, happier life without the threat of addiction to harsher prescription drugs like opioids, companies like Starseed Medicinal stepped up to revolutionize the medical cannabis industry. Starseed’s end-to-end service model responds to considerations and concerns from plan sponsors and employers to employees, helping them navigating through the largely uncharted and sometimes overwhelming territory of medical cannabis.

According to Starseed, there are three elements to consider when establishing a modern and sustainable drug-related workplace policy: (1) setting better expectations, (2) reducing risk to the employer and employees and (3) providing a clear line of sight to the parameters of accommodation. Employers are required to provide a safe workplace for employees, which means accommodating their medical needs. On the flip side, employers are concerned that cannabis use at work can lead to impairment and increased risk of injuries or incidents. In response to this, Starseed supports zero tolerance applied appropriately. When discussing zero tolerance, it’s important to make the distinction between zero tolerance of impairment, and zero tolerance of all narcotics, even those that do not cause impairment. Understanding the difference will require further cannabis education for those penning these policies. Something that Starseed has also worked into their model.

As Canada’s acceptance and normalization of cannabis continues to grow and adapt, workplaces will have to grow and adapt as well or fear being left behind as its citizens increasingly work with companies that are arming themselves with policies for not only today but tomorrow and beyond. Those blazing the trail, licensed producers like Starseed and the various partners with whom they stand shoulder-to-shoulder, are the ones working to create the 21st-century workplace during this global movement.

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Janelle Simone Medical Cannabis 3 months ago / Scarborough, Ontario

Very interesting news! https://www.greenentrepreneur.com/article/334002?utm_source=HearstNewspapers&utm_medium=related&utm_campaign=syndication

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Study Finds Marijuana Users Have Better Chance of Surviving Heart Attack

GreenEntrepreneur

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. A new study involving millions of medical records and analysis of patient outcomes has found that those who use marijuana have a better chance of surviving after being hospitalized with a heart attack.

https://www.greenentrepreneur.com/article/334002

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JADEO Medical Cannabis 3 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} What Are The Differences Between Dried Cannabis Flower And Oil?

Dried Cannabis Flower versus Cannabis Oil, wondering what the difference is and how they're used? Watch now as Dr. Peter Blecher, Chief Medical Officer, Starseed Medicinal Inc. explains.


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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

-



Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo

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Mike Robinson Medical Cannabis 3 months ago / Santa Barbara, Alberta


How Cannabis Treats My PTSD

Every Memorial Day weekend the same series of events, mostly during sleep, occur that surround the life altering wreck on the racetrack back in 1995. PTSD is the acronym of the weekend to beat ~ I got this. I’m plagued with nightmares that lead up to this date, last night I qualified for the big Sunday race in my dreams as it wasn’t a nightmare.. not yet. Normally that’s reserved for tonight. This year? I’m writing about it instead of holding it in. That's one of the biggest problems for those of us that fight this - internalization of our feelings as for the most part the outside world can't see this problem by looking at us and often will dismiss it as something that we should have 'already gotten over' - likely the worse words to use towards or about someone with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. We don't need to 'get over it', we need to work through it which is why I'm typing right now when I'd rather not be. Let's face it - going through trauma is not rare. About 6 of every 10 men (or 60%) and 5 of every 10 women (or 50%) experience at least one trauma in their lives. Women are more likely to experience sexual assault and child sexual abuse. Men are more likely to experience accidents, physical assault, combat, disaster, or to witness death or injury.

PTSD can happen to anyone and it's important to understand it's not a sign of weakness, those I know that are survivors and fight this show me their strength. There's a number of factors can increase the chance that someone will develop this and almost all are not under that person's control. For example, if you were directly exposed to the trauma or injured, you are more likely to develop PTSD - maybe you could have avoided the situation or event that caused this, but it's likely something we never planned on happening. In my case there was a known risk. But, How do we live with this? How do we get others to be aware of what we're going through - especially during 'trigger moments' - or like this weekend for me - trigger days. For others it could be the anniversary of just about anything or the reminder of it. For me since I've worked through my problems on my own for the most part - it's the Cannabis Plant that changes my life and allows me to get by. Before I started ingesting oils and extracts from the plant I would often end up hospitalized over Memorial Day weekend as the combination of PTSD and Epilepsy generally means the patient is going to seize. Without cannabis ingested and inhaled, today would be much harder than it is. The plant allows me to refocus, relax, and move out of the anxiety that can literally paralyze a person with memories of the past trauma flooding their mind. Cannabis extracts cause this racing mind to put on the brakes - and literally stop the wreck from mentally recurring in my sleep or even waking hours.

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Today I can make two choices - one would be to continue down the path I go every year on Memorial Day weekend, the other is to stop and consider the fact I'm alive, I can walk again, talk again, see again, I'm free of the pharmaceutical opioids that were started heavily after the wreck, I have my life back. Figuring out what to do with it and how to live it can be a challenge while fighting anxiety, depression, and other effects of PTSD. I believe it's very important for people that are coping with this to have people to talk to. Sometimes It seems like people want to dismiss it, compare it, or to minimize the symptoms, for the patient with this going on that's not good. Today I felt the best way to really talk about this was to write about it. Even if nobody ever read this it's a release that's necessary. I can't count the number of times I've woken in the middle of sleep and realized I'm not on the racetrack - and other times when I've woken in a hospital bed to realize the same thing while I examining my body for injuries from grand mal seizures. As it is PTSD can cause psycho-motor seizures in some cases, but when you add an Epilepsy diagnosis to it - it's like pouring fuel on a fire.

For me it's THC and it's brother or sister CBN that do the most for me, but I won't discount CBD as long as I don't take very high of a dose. Everyone is different and with me I find that CBD alone will make me edgy vs. calm - especially if it's made with Isolate. But when I have the right combination of THC with a tad of CBD and along with CBN I get a very calm feeling that allows my mind to slow down and relax. As it is I already think quickly, speak likely too fast, and type too much - so this combo is an awesome one on any given day. Perfect for replacing opioids, stopping seizures, controlling PTSD, and keeping cancer in remission while also fighting chronic pain. The list is so long of what my own continually changing cannabinoid medicine protocol does for me, the reason it has to be a fluctuating protocol is due to the number of issues being addressed.

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For example, this weekend I'll be dosing very high with THC during the day. 10:1 and 20:1 (Whole plant Cannabis) THC:CBD with CBN used separately in the afternoon and evenings to build up the ability to sleep through the race that continues in mind mind after the eyes close. Because CBD does have an uplifting effect on me that's what I'm using more in the morning as it allows me to escape depression that comes after a night of racing and wrecking in my sleep and the anxiety of the knowledge it can and does happen. It's all a matter of knowing ourselves, our bodies, and how Cannabinoids/The Plant will work for us. This is a trial and error type of creation when it comes to protocols, the necessity to change a protocol is easy to spot - it's not working right. With doctors and pharmaceuticals we see the limitations they have right away when comparing the plant to pills. It's way harder to 'dial in' a protocol of pharmaceuticals that will work in my opinion for most people with PTSD, so the issue once again is access for all patients.

We can live a better life and make it through times of trouble if we have the right supports. Sometimes that means people willing to listen and help you and it definitely means the right medicinal support. Many will choose western medicine or natural without thinking "I'll use both" and integrating the use of cannabis and extracts into their healthcare. I do this purposely although I'd rather not when it comes to PTSD as I literally don't want to talk about it with a doctor that's given me a short time slot to see them in. I also don't want to talk to a psychiatrist that quickly prescribes pills I don't need or psychologists that will see me so little that it has no benefit. But I do want my medical file documented and have had 2 pharmaceuticals removed over the years of using cannabis that both were prescribed for 'Severe PTSD & Anxiety" with medical records now indicating the use of cannabis and cbd oil instead of them. Sometimes Integrating your cannabis medicine into your other treatments get tricky - but I don't make my goal of it all to be right in debates with doctors, The goal has always been to get the medication list to show cannabis and extract use as the pharmaceutical use diminishes.

We can overcome the symptoms of PTSD - whether it's the use of cannabinoid medicine or another support system - hang in there because life gets better. If you're suffering from this - stay strong and stay bold, be your own hero. Remember that the more you speak out about this the more you are listened to and the better you'll feel inside. For me it doesn't matter if not one person reads this as I wrote this article for my own well being knowing it likely could help others.

Mike Robinson, Medicinal Cannabis Patient, Founder - Global Cannabinoid Research Center. And, most of all, Genevieve's Daddy ~

https://www.mikesmedicines.com/medical-marijuana/the-cannabis-love-story/


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Cannabis Wiki CBD 1 day ago / London, Ontario


CBD for fighting sleep disorders

Wanna get that good night's rest but suffering from insomnia? Well, what if there is an aid for all your sleeping disorders? CBD is a natural chemical that is found in the cannabis plant; It is a phytocannabinoid that interacts with endocannabinoid receptors in our bodies. The same receptors that are responsible for all our homeostatic functions, which can interfere with our sleep patterns!

For the full article and more check out Cannabis wiki.

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Cannabis Wiki Health & Wellness 2 weeks ago / London, Ontario


Are there any cannabis products for helping with social anxiety?

Most of us knows how it feels to be socially awkward, whether its feeling uncomfortable in a room full of people or getting sweaty upon making a presentation or even clammed up in a social situation. Well, what if we help to ease that discomfort? Research is proving that cannabis is effective for relieving anxiety, and with the correct strain, you'll be able to show up and show out in a room full of people.

For the full guide and more, check out Cannabis Wiki.

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  • From Janelle Simone

    Super important topic!

Mike Robinson Medical Cannabis 2 weeks ago / Santa Barbara, Alberta


Katree Saunders: A Cannabis Industry Professional Talks

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She's Heading To D.C. To Speak!

Katree Darriel Saunders of Las Vegas has an intense story that would take a book to truly tell. She treats a plethora of health issues with medicinal cannabis and has been featured in multiple publications for her advocacy and lobbying work for patient rights with Americans for Safe Access and NORML. Many patients have a history like hers that includes being tricked into going jail by a deceptive DEA agent – literally incarcerated for possession of a small amount of hash and cannabis. That Nevada sting operation cost her several months of her life - behind bars. In her past she gained momentum at first as a patients rights advocate way back in 2010 when she volunteered for ‘Organizing America’ – a political event in which President Obama spoke about healthcare reform. After being chosen to be on stage and being sat behind him, she shook his hand and had a brief exchange with the president in which Saunders said “We needed to talk about medical patient’s rights.’” She states her responded with “We’re not prosecuting.”

A beyond exciting occurrence for someone who’s been behind bars for possessing the plant – an ability to confront the president about the freedom for all to use what many of us already do on a daily basis. Even though the state of Nevada has made it difficult for her to work, she still is going at it and on her way to Washington DC in days to speak on patients behalf at the NORML conference and congressional lobby day. “I’ve worked in the Industry for years, but now the state doesn’t want to allow a felon to hold a cannabis card or be in the industry. With the new legalization laws across the nation expunging records, patients like myself need freedom. It’s not easy to work in the industry as it is, there’s many false hopes and promises unfulfilled. I have my share of good stories and also bad experiences.”

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(Saunders in 2010 in her meet and greet with President Obama, which was covered by C-Span)

As a patient she’s very complex and has quite the detailed history. I did a brief interview that goes much further into the why and hows of her medicinal cannabis journey. She was featured in Vegas Cannabis Magazine as a veteran of the industry with extensive knowledge in helping patients learn about the synergistic relationship of cannabinoids, terpenes, and cannabis products. James Priest of Emerald Magazine did an entire story on her called “My Bust” that’s very interesting, it’s pertaining to the Sting operation that she was caught up in. I’ve had the pleasure of meeting Katree at conferences in Las Vegas, she speaks at local events and more – as well as making waves across social media in regards to patient access, rights, and more. Let’s have a look at how she responded to my own questions for her about her personal use of cannabis and CBD…

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How did you find out about medicinal cannabis or CBD? “I started using cannabis at 16 after a slip and fall at work at McDonald’s and hurting my back. I didn’t find out about CBD until about 2008- 2009 and then started using that too. Cannabis was what helped me get off opioids and benzo’s, it keeps me off of pharmaceuticals.”

What are you treating, can you tell me how the health issue effects you?

“I’m treating fibromyalgia, chronic pain, nerve damage, carpal tunnel, and ruptured disc in my back and neck – spondylosis . As well, I have Hidradenitis suppurativa, PTSD , anxiety from being a prisoner of war. My health issues affect me severely every day. I need foot surgery as I walk on a broken foot that never healed – part of the injuries I sustained in a motor vehicle accident back when I was pre trial. My doctor ended up dying and I had to find a new doctor and get all new medical records. They want to take bone from my hip to fix my foot. Cannabis helps with the chronic pain and neuropathy issues.”

How do you use/consume medicinal cannabis? “I use cannabis flower smoked and vaped, topical products of all types, cannabis oils ingested with specific terpenes that help with pain and inflammation. I look for strains or oils high in a-pinene, myrcene, bisabolol, and linalool. I use all the cannabinoids I can. Especially THC, CBN, CBG, CBC, and of course CBD. They all help the situation – they ease my pain and reduce swelling. When I was working I was using over 4 grams of THC Cannabis oil a week and about 1000 mg of CBD. I make a lot of my own medicine with the magical butter machine. I’d like to thank Garyn from there!”

What type of reaction do you get from friends and family about using Cannabis? “At first people just thought that I was trying to get high, but after CBD got legal people understand now. It’s medicine and I’m using it for pain relief so it’s not as bad as it once was – now they all call me for advice!”

Did you take pharmaceutical medications – if so, has cannabis decreased this? “I am five years pill free from opiates and benzo’s due to medical cannabis, it replaced the pills.”

What else would you like to share about your journey? “As a patient, It’s hard at times to fit into the cannabis industry and keep a positive outlook. The culture of the corporations can be good but there’s many vultures as well. Knowing that the plant didn’t do anything wrong and it shouldn’t be illegal helps me get through it – patients need to talk and those that can should be voices for others. Not all have the right reasons for being in the cannabis industry and some of us are doing it to heal from much more than our illnesses. I’ve had issues in the past in trying to further myself, but I believe many have. I’m just trying to help the community and hope that the industry follows the patients lead.”

What advice would you give to those considering trying out plant medicine like this, but waiting to get more information? “Your body has an Endocannabinoid system that works synergistic with the cannabinoids found in the plant as well as specific terpenes (that come from the plant) to help with pain and inflammation. There’s so much the plant’s medicine can do for people beyond that, education goes along way.”

How is your life now after you’ve discovered how to heal/treat yourself differently. Has your activity level increased? “I can now enjoy my life and my children a lot more and the pain hasn’t subsided but it’s manageable due to cannabis for a much longer extended time relief than opiates and benzo’s every did. Being happy and positive about the future is priceless and cannabis gives me my life back to do so. Being able to teach others about cannabis education and the health benefits is healing in itself.”

What myth about Cannabis do you believe needs to be squashed? “That is a harmful substance, it’s a beautiful plant from God that is here to nourish us just as we need nourishment for our other organs. Our cannabinoid receptors, CB one and two, need to be nourished as well by the cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant.”

If you could send a message, any message, to the world – what would it be? “We need to end federal cannabis prohibition so people can have safe access to this life giving plant. Give cannabis a chance – it’ll bring your body back into homeostasis without the horrible side effects of pharmaceutical medication. God gave us an Endocannabinoid system that should be nourished and the cannabis plant does that synergistically speaking.”

Have your kids benefited from your use of Cannabis, has it enabled you as a Mom? "It allows me to be a better parent, without my health I'm not able to care for them as well, this would go for anyone treating an illness. My son Josiah uses CBD for migraines - he's almost 13. My oldest Ian is 19, and Azariah is 7, my kids are aware mom uses natural medicine. They all benefit from their mom having the freedom to use the plant instead of pills."

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——————

Reading the links in this story gives one a mini series of the life of a cannabis patient that gets caught with a small amount of it in a state with very strict laws. Since legalization many have been waiting for changes in their state that includes the release of people in prison for convictions like hers as well as expunging of past criminal records related to cannabis possession or even growing it. Many are like Katree are waiting for this to be done federally so that people across America have the ability to speak out. You can contact her on Facebook or LinkedIn if you’d like to help her in the lobbying endeavors or are looking for someone to represent your company in the industry.

Mike Robinson, Medicinal Cannabis Patient. Founder, Global Cannabinoid Research Center. But, most of all, Genevieve’s Daddy https://www.mikesmedicines.com/medical-marijuana/the-cannabis-love-story/

Cover photo credit: Michael W. Rogers

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  • From BahaqueenM

    quite a story!

JADEO Medical Cannabis 2 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


Cannabis: A New Way to Treat Fibromyalgia and Diabetic Nerve Pain?

An estimated 1.5% of adults of the household population of Canada suffers from Fibromyalgia, a chronic disorder that includes symptoms like widespread joint and muscle pain, fatigue and cognitive difficulties. Also consider, that more than 3.4 million Canadians have diabetes, and more than half of them will have some form of nerve damage as a result. These illnesses are described as invisible diseases because their painful effects are not seen by the naked eye. For many diagnosed with these painful chronic illnesses, the medication prescribed has more negative effects than positive.

There's a new treatment worth considering - Cannabis. With its decriminalization, we are now seeing it become more of a key player in the medical community. Cannabis is now the new medicinal hope for many suffering from chronic ailments.

What is the Cannabis Patch?

The Cannabis Patch has been developed by Cannabis Science, Inc. There are 2 patches targeted at managing Fibromyalgia, and Diabetic Nerve Pain. The patches applied to the surface of the skin, provide a slow, controlled dose of the cannabinoid best known as CBD. While the same technology, each patch is designed to best treat the effects of the specific disease they target. The interesting fact to note here is that patch opts to use CBD and not its more popular sister THC.

Mary's Medicinals was first to market with the Cannabis patch, but not as a treatment for specific illnesses. They simply offer controlled doses of CBD, THC, or THC & CBD combined for any particular use.

So What Exactly is CBD?

CBD (Cannabidiol) is one of the most prevalent cannabinoids found in Cannabis. Only second to THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol). It packs many amazing health benefits. It’s most attractive being that it does not contain the psychoactive component that THC does. In other words, you can reap many of the amazing health benefits of Cannabis minus the high.

Known benefits of CBD include;

  • It works as an anti-inflammatory.
  • Reduces pain.
  • May reduce seizures and other neurological disorders.
  • Reduces the effects of anxiety disorder.
  • Promotes a feeling of calm and relaxation

What does this have to do with Fibromyalgia and Diabetic Nerve Pain?

The controlled release of CBD from the Cannabis patch is considered an amazing treatment for the diseases as it reduces the inflammation associated with the illnesses. By reducing the inflammation the CBD also minimizes the pain as it is usually one of the main causes of the pain. CBD is also a natural pain reliever and can reduce any other forms of pain associated with these diseases.

Research is already proving Cannabis to be a more effective treatment method for Fibromyalgia symptoms. In a 2014 survey conducted by The Global Pain Foundation & The National Pain Report, 62% of Fibromyalgia patients who tried cannabis said it was very effective at treating their symptoms. Another 33% said it helped a little and only 5% said it did not help at all. Compare this to the fact that over 60% of respondents admitted the medication prescribed to them (Cymbalta, Lyrica, Savella) did not work at all! To be fair, please note that research on Cannabis and its health benefits is somewhat limited due to its prolonged illegal status.

We can only expect that as legalization becomes widespread that more research will be conducted. As a result, this has the potential to become a more popular form of treatment for chronic illnesses. This will be a game changer for the medical industry, as it will provide patients with a better solution for symptoms of their chronic illness.

It is important to note, that the laws for purchase and consumption methods of cannabis, including CBD, vary per country and state/province. Always ensure you know and respect the law and others.

Remember to always consult your doctor before beginning any type of wellness treatment.

-

Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo

Related comments

  • From Janelle Simone

    Very interesting the different ways that cannabis can be dosed and received as a treatment. Definitely a revolutionary plant, man!

  • From 22

    Dosage control will be everything..

JADEO Medical Cannabis 2 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


5 Ways Cannabis Is Being Used In The Field Of Mental Health

Is Cannabis Just a Hot Trend Or The Real Deal?

Cannabis is more than a trend. This tiny green plant continues to amaze the world and to be studied and tested as we explore its potential to treat a variety of mental health issues. While more extensive research is needed on how cannabis effects those suffering from mental health conditions, the results coming from some initial testing and case studies have been very promising.

The research on cannabis’s effect on mental health is leading some scientists to call for the allowance of CBD (cannabidiol) in various treatments. Many forward-thinking researchers want to see laws passed that allow CBD to be used for mental health treatment in the same way that it is currently used to treat epilepsy and the accompanying seizures experienced by those with the condition.

Let's have a look at the top trends we are seeing in the study of cannabis and how cannabis may be used to treat various mental health symptoms and diseases.

1. Cannabis and the Treatment of PTSD

Many veterans are currently using cannabis to help them deal with the symptoms that come with PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder) after returning home from service. Several states currently approve of medically prescribed cannabis as a way to treat PTSD as a specific mental health condition. While the studies of using cannabis for PTSD are not extensive, many veterans in states where it is legal are using the substance to help them cope with symptoms, including nightmares and flashbacks, that often accompany PTSD.

2. CBD and Social Anxiety

A study published in 2011 stated that there is evidence that CBD could help those who suffer from social anxiety. Participants in the study reported that they felt more at ease in social situations, such as meeting new people or speaking in public, when they were able to take limited, evenly-timed doses of CBD rather than those who did not have access to cannabis. More studies need to be done to see if these findings are substantiated.

3. CBD May Reduce General Anxiety & Panic Attacks

Many people who experience consistent anxiety and those who have panic attacks are beginning to use controlled doses of CBD to help alleviate their symptoms. CBD is believed to have an impact on brain chemistry by suppressing the hormone THC which causes anxiety and can, therefore, stimulate panic attacks. Many people who suffer from these conditions have reported that CBD eases their symptoms, including shortness of breath, chest pains, and cognitive impairments.

4. CBD and the Treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

People with OCD who regularly take small, controlled doses of CBD report feeling more relaxed and less likely to repeat obsessive behaviours. While many individuals in states with legalized cannabis report these symptoms and some of the results for these individuals have been promising, these claims are not yet substantiated by medical research. Studies have been produced that show a decrease in OCD-related behaviour in rats and mice, although no human testing has been done at this time.

5. CBD Is Showing Promise To Help Those With Schizophrenia

Research is showing that there may be some substantiated claims that CBD can be used to improve the symptoms of people living with schizophrenia. Those who tried using cannabis to help control symptoms experienced fewer hallucinations and/or delusions, less difficulty thinking/concentrating, and more motivation in their daily lives.

While this research is promising, more studies are needed to determine if CBD can be used as a treatment to help a majority of those with schizophrenia disorder.

While many of these positive correlations between the use of cannabis and improved mental health show potential, far more research needs to be done before cannabis, and more specifically CBD, is accepted in the treatment of mental health conditions. As the number of studies increase, it will be determined if these findings are substantiated to recommend cannabis as a mainstream treatment for mental health conditions.

It is important to note, that the laws for purchase and consumption methods of cannabis, including CBD, vary per country and state/province. Always ensure you know and respect the law and others.

Remember to always consult your doctor before beginning any type of wellness treatment.

-

Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo

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  • From Sativasky

    I’ll be open about this, I use it to treat some mild depression from time to time, and it really gets that weight off my shoulders and let’s me relax and think about all the good that is happening in my life ❤️

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JADEO Medical Cannabis 2 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


How To Talk To Your Doctor About Cannabis

Despite the fact that medicinal cannabis is legal in Canada, it can be a bit unnerving to talk to a doctor about cannabis treatments. First of all, some people still associate smoking cannabis with a negative stereotype, fuelled by misinformation and flat-out lies. The truth is, cannabis is used as an effective treatment for a wide variety of ailments from chronic pain to PTSD, many times replacing pharmaceuticals. Increasingly, medical professionals are endorsing its use and even recommend it to their patients when other options don't work. If you're considering cannabis treatments for a medical condition and you're nervous about talking to your doctor, relax. Here are a few tips that will help you get the conversation started so you can get the medicine you need.

Do Your Research

First of all, if you're not in Canada you'll want to know whether you're a resident of a medical cannabis state, or if you're barking up the wrong tree. If you're in one of the legal states, you will need to know if your condition qualifies for the medical marijuana program. For most states and in Canada, it's possible to get a medical marijuana card for certain cancers, chronic pain, and increasingly for depression, PTSD and a variety of other conditions and ailments. Keep in mind that some states allow physicians to approve cannabis use for medical conditions that aren't listed, on a case-by-case basis, so even if yours isn't listed, don't be discouraged.

Be Completely Honest

When you speak to your doctor, everything that is said between you is confidential, so be honest about your interest in cannabis treatments. If you're already consuming cannabis to help you with an illness, pain, or other issues, say so. Explain why you believe that cannabis is a viable treatment option for you, based on your own experience and research. Print out studies, and other information that you believe supports your reasoning and take it to the appointment with you. Be ready to answer questions about the frequency of your consumption, how it helps your condition, and whether you've experienced any unwanted side-effects.

Ask Lots of Questions

There are no dumb questions, especially when it comes to your personal health and well-being. If you're new to cannabis use, you may not realize that there are potential side-effects that some people encounter, so ask your doctor. Make sure you understand exactly what the risks are for you, depending on your age, other medications you're taking and your overall health. It's also a good idea to discuss how you will be consuming your cannabis. Will you be smoking, vaping or eating it? What are the potential benefits of each type of consumption and what method does the doctor recommend? If you've experimented, you'll likely have a preference, but it's always good to get a second opinion.

Don't Try To Force It

The truth is, not all medical doctors support the use of cannabis as a treatment for any diseases or conditions. This may be because of their religious beliefs, political affiliations, or personal opinions. If you're noting resistance from your doctor with regards to medical cannabis, this can be the perfect opportunity to educate them about its benefits. That being said, it can be difficult to change someone's mind, especially when they have long-held beliefs about the dangers of cannabis. If you're in this situation, remember that you do have choices and if you're not getting the cooperation you desire, it may be time to find a new doctor that's more open to alternative options for health care.

The truth is, many doctors already know that the plant offers a great deal of promise for treating a wide variety of illnesses and medical conditions. For a lot of doctors, their reservations when it comes to prescribing medicinal cannabis stem not from a lack of belief in its effectiveness, but from the scarcity of in-depth research and long-term studies on the effects and as well as how to prescribe the proper dosage. If you're considering cannabis as a treatment option, take the time to do your research, so you're prepared to ask your doctor the questions that matter most to you. If your doctor isn't agreeable, don't think you don't have a choice, you can always change doctors. It is, after all, your health and you should absolutely be in control.

Planning to discuss cannabis with your doctor? Here are 3 questions to get the conversation started.

  • Is cannabis a viable treatment for my condition?
  • Would using cannabis affect any of my other medications?
  • Are there any potential side effects?

It is important to note, that the laws for purchase and consumption methods of cannabis, including CBD, vary per country and state/province. Always ensure you know and respect the law and others.

Remember to always consult your doctor before beginning any type of wellness treatment.


Stay informed. Stay Connected.
#WeAreJadeo

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JADEO Medical Cannabis 3 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} Can Cannabis Be As Addictive As Opioids?

Curious about whether cannabis is as addictive as opioids? Watch now as Dr. Peter Blecher, Chief Medical Officer, Starseed Medicinal Inc. provides the answer.

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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

-

Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo

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JADEO Medical Cannabis 3 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


Medical Cannabis In The Workplace

Canada has certainly come a long way since cannabis prohibition back in the 1920s. However, it wasn’t until recently, some 80 years after prohibition, that Health Canada allowed access to cannabis for medical purposes. Even now in 2019 with legalization, there is still an information gap and negative stigma around cannabis, and as long as it exists it could prevent millions of Canadians from properly treating their chronic pain and ailments.

Medical cannabis use in Canada is indeed rising, which is why it is important to discuss cannabis in the workplace now more than ever. Registered medical cannabis patients in Canada increased from 23,930 in 2015 to over 330,000 in 2018, a 14-times increase in just three years. Health Canada projects that number will increase to 450,000 by 2024.

With the rise of medical cannabis users and the aforementioned information gap in mind, let’s begin by clearing the air around medical cannabis with some facts.

“Medical cannabis patients are not looking to get high. They are looking to get well” - Starseed Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Peter M. Blecher.

Perhaps the most important factor skeptics need to understand is that medical cannabis can play a key role in the treatment of chronic pain. This is especially true when considering the “Chronic Pain Triad”, three interrelated pillars— pain intensity, mental health and wellness, and sleep quality. These three elements make up the basis for most chronic pain. Each of these three elements may contribute to any other two, either in an aggravating or alleviating manner. Traditional management for any of these contributing factors often involves multiple drugs daily, but medical cannabis is said to present an opportunity for individuals to treat all three elements with a single prescription, simplifying and eliminating a potentially dangerous regime of medications. It seems as though Canadian patients and prescribers rely heavily on opioids as their primary form of treatment, but in a 2017 study called Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, 80% of patients reported that cannabis by itself was more effective than their opioid treatments.

In terms of cannabis in the workplace, a recent study from Sanofi Canada Healthcare found that 64% of employees with workplace health plans agreed that ‘medical cannabis, when authorized by a physician, should be covered by their health benefit plan’. Despite this and evidence that demonstrates the beneficial use of medical cannabis in place of some prescription drugs (i.e. opioids), approximately only 4% of employers offer coverage for medical cannabis according to the HRPA (Human Resources Professionals Association). It is understood that a common factor impeding the increase in coverage for medical cannabis are regulatory roadblocks. For instance, the federal government has yet to include medical cannabis as an approved drug under the Food and Drugs act – as a result, it does not have a Drug Identification Number (DIN). These numbers, which are issued by Health Canada, which are granted by Health Canada,, indicate that a drug has been evaluated and approved by the government. Until a DIN is established, employers will find it difficult to apply traditional drug coverage for medical cannabis under their existing health benefit plans.

Understanding this treatment was vital for many to live a healthier, happier life without the threat of addiction to harsher prescription drugs like opioids, companies like Starseed Medicinal stepped up to revolutionize the medical cannabis industry. Starseed’s end-to-end service model responds to considerations and concerns from plan sponsors and employers to employees, helping them navigating through the largely uncharted and sometimes overwhelming territory of medical cannabis.

According to Starseed, there are three elements to consider when establishing a modern and sustainable drug-related workplace policy: (1) setting better expectations, (2) reducing risk to the employer and employees and (3) providing a clear line of sight to the parameters of accommodation. Employers are required to provide a safe workplace for employees, which means accommodating their medical needs. On the flip side, employers are concerned that cannabis use at work can lead to impairment and increased risk of injuries or incidents. In response to this, Starseed supports zero tolerance applied appropriately. When discussing zero tolerance, it’s important to make the distinction between zero tolerance of impairment, and zero tolerance of all narcotics, even those that do not cause impairment. Understanding the difference will require further cannabis education for those penning these policies. Something that Starseed has also worked into their model.

As Canada’s acceptance and normalization of cannabis continues to grow and adapt, workplaces will have to grow and adapt as well or fear being left behind as its citizens increasingly work with companies that are arming themselves with policies for not only today but tomorrow and beyond. Those blazing the trail, licensed producers like Starseed and the various partners with whom they stand shoulder-to-shoulder, are the ones working to create the 21st-century workplace during this global movement.

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JADEO Medical Cannabis 3 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} What Are The Differences Between Dried Cannabis Flower And Oil?

Dried Cannabis Flower versus Cannabis Oil, wondering what the difference is and how they're used? Watch now as Dr. Peter Blecher, Chief Medical Officer, Starseed Medicinal Inc. explains.


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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

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Mike Robinson Medical Cannabis 3 months ago / Santa Barbara, Alberta


How Cannabis Treats My PTSD

Every Memorial Day weekend the same series of events, mostly during sleep, occur that surround the life altering wreck on the racetrack back in 1995. PTSD is the acronym of the weekend to beat ~ I got this. I’m plagued with nightmares that lead up to this date, last night I qualified for the big Sunday race in my dreams as it wasn’t a nightmare.. not yet. Normally that’s reserved for tonight. This year? I’m writing about it instead of holding it in. That's one of the biggest problems for those of us that fight this - internalization of our feelings as for the most part the outside world can't see this problem by looking at us and often will dismiss it as something that we should have 'already gotten over' - likely the worse words to use towards or about someone with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. We don't need to 'get over it', we need to work through it which is why I'm typing right now when I'd rather not be. Let's face it - going through trauma is not rare. About 6 of every 10 men (or 60%) and 5 of every 10 women (or 50%) experience at least one trauma in their lives. Women are more likely to experience sexual assault and child sexual abuse. Men are more likely to experience accidents, physical assault, combat, disaster, or to witness death or injury.

PTSD can happen to anyone and it's important to understand it's not a sign of weakness, those I know that are survivors and fight this show me their strength. There's a number of factors can increase the chance that someone will develop this and almost all are not under that person's control. For example, if you were directly exposed to the trauma or injured, you are more likely to develop PTSD - maybe you could have avoided the situation or event that caused this, but it's likely something we never planned on happening. In my case there was a known risk. But, How do we live with this? How do we get others to be aware of what we're going through - especially during 'trigger moments' - or like this weekend for me - trigger days. For others it could be the anniversary of just about anything or the reminder of it. For me since I've worked through my problems on my own for the most part - it's the Cannabis Plant that changes my life and allows me to get by. Before I started ingesting oils and extracts from the plant I would often end up hospitalized over Memorial Day weekend as the combination of PTSD and Epilepsy generally means the patient is going to seize. Without cannabis ingested and inhaled, today would be much harder than it is. The plant allows me to refocus, relax, and move out of the anxiety that can literally paralyze a person with memories of the past trauma flooding their mind. Cannabis extracts cause this racing mind to put on the brakes - and literally stop the wreck from mentally recurring in my sleep or even waking hours.

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Today I can make two choices - one would be to continue down the path I go every year on Memorial Day weekend, the other is to stop and consider the fact I'm alive, I can walk again, talk again, see again, I'm free of the pharmaceutical opioids that were started heavily after the wreck, I have my life back. Figuring out what to do with it and how to live it can be a challenge while fighting anxiety, depression, and other effects of PTSD. I believe it's very important for people that are coping with this to have people to talk to. Sometimes It seems like people want to dismiss it, compare it, or to minimize the symptoms, for the patient with this going on that's not good. Today I felt the best way to really talk about this was to write about it. Even if nobody ever read this it's a release that's necessary. I can't count the number of times I've woken in the middle of sleep and realized I'm not on the racetrack - and other times when I've woken in a hospital bed to realize the same thing while I examining my body for injuries from grand mal seizures. As it is PTSD can cause psycho-motor seizures in some cases, but when you add an Epilepsy diagnosis to it - it's like pouring fuel on a fire.

For me it's THC and it's brother or sister CBN that do the most for me, but I won't discount CBD as long as I don't take very high of a dose. Everyone is different and with me I find that CBD alone will make me edgy vs. calm - especially if it's made with Isolate. But when I have the right combination of THC with a tad of CBD and along with CBN I get a very calm feeling that allows my mind to slow down and relax. As it is I already think quickly, speak likely too fast, and type too much - so this combo is an awesome one on any given day. Perfect for replacing opioids, stopping seizures, controlling PTSD, and keeping cancer in remission while also fighting chronic pain. The list is so long of what my own continually changing cannabinoid medicine protocol does for me, the reason it has to be a fluctuating protocol is due to the number of issues being addressed.

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For example, this weekend I'll be dosing very high with THC during the day. 10:1 and 20:1 (Whole plant Cannabis) THC:CBD with CBN used separately in the afternoon and evenings to build up the ability to sleep through the race that continues in mind mind after the eyes close. Because CBD does have an uplifting effect on me that's what I'm using more in the morning as it allows me to escape depression that comes after a night of racing and wrecking in my sleep and the anxiety of the knowledge it can and does happen. It's all a matter of knowing ourselves, our bodies, and how Cannabinoids/The Plant will work for us. This is a trial and error type of creation when it comes to protocols, the necessity to change a protocol is easy to spot - it's not working right. With doctors and pharmaceuticals we see the limitations they have right away when comparing the plant to pills. It's way harder to 'dial in' a protocol of pharmaceuticals that will work in my opinion for most people with PTSD, so the issue once again is access for all patients.

We can live a better life and make it through times of trouble if we have the right supports. Sometimes that means people willing to listen and help you and it definitely means the right medicinal support. Many will choose western medicine or natural without thinking "I'll use both" and integrating the use of cannabis and extracts into their healthcare. I do this purposely although I'd rather not when it comes to PTSD as I literally don't want to talk about it with a doctor that's given me a short time slot to see them in. I also don't want to talk to a psychiatrist that quickly prescribes pills I don't need or psychologists that will see me so little that it has no benefit. But I do want my medical file documented and have had 2 pharmaceuticals removed over the years of using cannabis that both were prescribed for 'Severe PTSD & Anxiety" with medical records now indicating the use of cannabis and cbd oil instead of them. Sometimes Integrating your cannabis medicine into your other treatments get tricky - but I don't make my goal of it all to be right in debates with doctors, The goal has always been to get the medication list to show cannabis and extract use as the pharmaceutical use diminishes.

We can overcome the symptoms of PTSD - whether it's the use of cannabinoid medicine or another support system - hang in there because life gets better. If you're suffering from this - stay strong and stay bold, be your own hero. Remember that the more you speak out about this the more you are listened to and the better you'll feel inside. For me it doesn't matter if not one person reads this as I wrote this article for my own well being knowing it likely could help others.

Mike Robinson, Medicinal Cannabis Patient, Founder - Global Cannabinoid Research Center. And, most of all, Genevieve's Daddy ~

https://www.mikesmedicines.com/medical-marijuana/the-cannabis-love-story/


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JADEO Medical Cannabis 3 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} Can I Use Medical Cannabis While On Other Medications?

Navigating prescription medications can be tricky. Watch now as Dr. Peter Blecher, Chief Medical Officer, Starseed Medicinal Inc. explains whether cannabis can be used with other medications.

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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

-


Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo

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JADEO Medical Cannabis 3 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} Medical Cannabis: Where Do You Start?

The thought of obtaining a medical cannabis prescription may seem daunting, but it's actually not as complicated as you may think. Watch now, as we walk you through the simple process.

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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

-



Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo

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  • From BahaqueenM

    wow, I've thought about medical marijuana before for a condition i experience never really thought the process was this simple. Will def look into this.

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