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It’s important for parents and teachers to educate themselves. Join the conversation to learn about protecting your kids/students and how to talk to them about their well-being and the law. Your safety is important to us. Always seek medical advice from your own doctor before starting any wellness treatment and report any violations of our posting standards. Stay Informed. Stay Healthy.

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James Parents and Teachers Group 1 month ago / Hamilton, Ontario

https://www.upi.com/Health_News/2018/12/22/Study-Teen-smoking-rates-dropped-after-Washington-legalized-marijuana/1661545500114/

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Study: Teen smoking rates dropped after Washington legalized marijuana

UPI

SATURDAY, Dec. 22, 2018 -- Contrary to predictions, teen marijuana use declined in Washington state after recreational pot was legalized in 2012, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from the Washington Healthy Youth Surveys of 2010-2012 and 2014-2016. They found that marijuana use among eighth-graders fell from almost 10 percent to just over 7 percent.

https://www.upi.com/Health_News/2018/12/22/Study-Teen-s...

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  • From Janelle Simone

    Very interesting!

Connor Christine Parents and Teachers Group 2 months ago / Hamilton, Ontario

Check out this great article I just came across. As mentioned at the end of this article, "With great power comes great responsibility" and it is so true in this circumstance.. What do you think? https://thecannabiscomplex.com/cannabis-and-the-kids/

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Cannabis And The Kids

The Cannabis Complex

Tobacco, alcohol and firearms are heavily regulated to ensure that children aren't unnecessarily exposed to danger. For all the anger about how restrictive some of the government legislation regulating cannabis has been, it's got to be understood in that context.

https://thecannabiscomplex.com/cannabis-and-the-kids/

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James Parents and Teachers Group 2 months ago / Hamilton, Ontario


What has changed? The effects of legalization on our classrooms.

As a high school teacher in a suburban public school, legalization has meant that more and more of my students have had information about cannabis thrust upon them by their peers, parents, teachers, and the media. I have a mandate to help them navigate life as individuals and teach them how to judge these sources of information for their inherent biases. But where do we turn for information in the ‘age of information’?

In spite of the internet’s scope, I am still the primary source of knowledge for the students in my classroom, which means I have to be informed first before answering their questions. My goal is to direct opinions towards ideas and facts. These make stronger and better-informed opinions, and stronger individuals, too! I think most teachers seek this same kind of objectivity in their classroom; my job is not to pontificate but to inform and help students learn for themselves.

How do we respond to students’ questions about cannabis? How are we keeping the messages from our school administrators and fellow teachers consistent? How can we maintain a healthy dialogue about cannabis without appearing permissive?

What do you say?

The other day, a student in my English class remarked that legalization looked like “a bad idea” for Canada. For him, the prospect of a legalizing a drugappeared—on its surface—like something bad. I mean, by thatrationale, can you blame him? Drugs are bad, right?

But I like to keep myself informed. I didn’t outrightly deny his claims. I didn’t really support them either. I just told him what I know to be true about cannabis: industry will try sell cannabis, they’ll sell it at particular places, people will use it, and law and order will adapt to a new climate under legalization.

I told him, for example, that it’s illegal for people under the age of 19 to buy cannabis (in Ontario). I told him that one of the proposed benefits of legalization is that researchers can begin testing its effects on humans, and any of its supposed benefits and risks can be weighed using the scientific method, moving it beyond experience and public opinion. I also told him that the Ontario Cannabis Store (the provincially owned shop, and sole proprietor for recreational cannabis in Ontario) is opening stores in 2019 to supplement online traffic.

Did I change his mind about anything? I’m not sure. I didn’t want to. But I do know that his comment brought on a slew of opinions and through-the-grape-vine comments from his classmates. “I heard that marijuana stores aren’t opening until next year.” “Can weed cure seizures?” Yeah! My brother gets seizures but he smokes a ton of pot.” “Is the legal age to buy cannabis the same everywhere?”

In my eyes, this episode was another in a long list of healthy conversations. My students have always felt safe to speak about topics for which they’re interested. I don’t care whether that’s video games, dance, weightlifting, the process of selecting a jury, cats, Cardi B, or cannabis. I have to be prepared with the wherewithal to respond and guide discussions, not stifle it.

What has changed?

This has happened again and again over the last year, and my sense is that it’s going to continue into the future. Most kids have a finger on the pulse of political and public life, even if that finger is a little tentatively outstretched and shaky (and easily distracted by their iPad). They sense that there has been a seismic shift, and it’s happening right in front of their very eyes.

Remember, too, that we teachers are mandated to teach the curriculum. That curriculum hasn’t changed since legalization. Not yet at least. Our messaging is supposed to remain consistent. It’s policy. But I’ve been getting the sense that even the students recognize how there has a been a seismic shift, and it’s happening right before their very eyes, and we have to be prepared faster than the law and policymakers to step up and answer their questions or guide their thinking. Many of our students—especially those in high school—are only a few years away from being voters, consumers, and dissenters. And by the time they’re in our classrooms, their civic engagement has already begun.

In all this, my job remains same: teach and inspire kids to learn and grow.

Related comments

  • From Michael Joseph

    Thank you, James for sharing your experience as a teacher in the era of cannabis legalization in Canada. Your practice, and approach is truly inspiring.

  • From Janelle Simone

    Super insightful James. I never took the time to think about the impact on teachers and the education system. I applaud you for not trying to sway them any direction but simply get them to think about varying angles. You sound like an awesome teacher, keep up the great work!

  • From KellyP

    Excellent article James!! Parents and teachers are all learning how to deal with legalization in Canada. We are going to have to educate ourselves the best we can so we can properly inform our children/students when they have questions.

    • From Michael Joseph

      Very well said. Students and children need guidance from their parents and teachers more than ever.

  • From Connor Christine

    Wow. What a great stance to take as a teacher. I hope that we can share this article and get as many teachers to see it as possible! If all educators could take the same view as you, we will definitely be headed in the right direction. Right now is a crucial time to help youth understand what they’re hearing in the news, on the radio and in media in general, and let them know that it’s okay to ask questions. Thanks for sharing James!

  • From ChrisS

    Thanks for the great article James, I also have not thought about the impact this will have on teachers. We need more teachers like you who educate by giving all the information without personal bias.

  • From DRogerson

    James - thank you for this post. The questions that you pose are meaningful to all educators alike. As a teacher myself, it is important to remember our responsibility as educators to keep ourselves informed and to give our students the tools that they need to learn for themselves!

  • From Kimr

    I also never took the time to think about how this would impact teachers.
    James your students are very fortunate that you are their teacher. It’s awesome that they feel comfortable enough with you that they can ask these questions. It’s so important that they are informed with the facts about Cannabis.

  • From faheem

    I read your post from the perspective of a parent. I guess the same approach is to be used when discussing cannabis with our kids, i.e. direct them towards ideas and facts, teach them to learn for themselves and to be responsible (and inspiring) members of society. Thanks for your insights.

Parents and Teachers Group 2 months ago

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Canada: officials urge action to keep edible marijuana away from children

Canada: officials urge action to keep edible marijuana away from children  The GuardianFull coverage

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/nov/11/canada-ca...

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JADEO Parents and Teachers Group 3 months ago / Toronto, Ontario

Many wonder about the impact of early cannabis use. Can it negatively affect the teenage brain? Watch and find out! https://jadeo.co/SIG/CannaBasics/what-effect-can-cannabis-have-on-the-teenage-brain

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What Effect Can Cannabis Have on the Teenage Brain?

JADEO

Canadian youth are among the top users of cannabis in the developed world, but do you know the effect it has on their brains? Learn more...

https://jadeo.co/SIG/CannaBasics/what-effect-can-cannab...

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JADEO Parents and Teachers Group 3 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


[VIDEO] How to Talk to Your Kids About Cannabis

Not sure how to approach talking to your kids about Cannabis? Watch this great informational video from Health Canada for tips on how to get the conversation started.


The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.


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Stay informed. Stay healthy.
#WeAreJadeo

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Parents and Teachers Group 3 months ago

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North Van school district to consider allowing cannabis for medicinal purposes

North Van school district to consider allowing cannabis for medicinal purposes  North Shore NewsFull coverage

https://www.nsnews.com/news/north-van-school-district-t...

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Parents and Teachers Group 3 months ago

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Study finds abstaining from pot improves memory, ability to learn in young users

Study finds abstaining from pot improves memory, ability to learn in young users  CTV NewsFull coverage

https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/study-finds-abstaining-fr...

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Parents and Teachers Group 3 months ago

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New Evidence Pot May Harm the Teen Brain

New Evidence Pot May Harm the Teen Brain  HealthDayCannabis Study: Memory and Learning Improve When Teens Quit Smoking Pot  NewsweekCannabis really DOES ruin your memory: Young men scored much better in mental tests within a WEEK of giving up ...  Daily MailFull coverage

https://consumer.healthday.com/kids-health-information-...

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JADEO Parents and Teachers Group 3 months ago / Toronto, Ontario

Struggling with how to talk to your kids about Cannabis? Watch this amazing and informative video to learn how to get the conversation started! https://jadeo.co/SIG/Parents-and-Teachers-Group/its-important-to-know-how-to-talk-to-your-kids-about-cannabis

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How to Talk to Your Kids About Cannabis

JADEO

Not sure how to approach talking to your kids about Cannabis? Watch this great informational video for tips on how to get the conversation started.

https://jadeo.co/SIG/Parents-and-Teachers-Group/its-imp...

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  • From Brianne Campbell

    I'm so happy Health Canada is creating videos like this one. It's so important to make sure kids feel comfortable asking questions about cannabis!

Parents and Teachers Group 3 months ago

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Colourfully named cannabis products appeal to youth, Tory health critic says

Colourfully named cannabis products appeal to youth, Tory health critic says  The ProvinceFull coverage

https://nationalpost.com/pmn/news-pmn/canada-news-pmn/c...

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  • From Janelle Simone

    I think to focus on the names is somewhat misguided. Youth are experimenting with prescription drugs and they have THE MOST non-appealing names ever. They are drawn in by the potential effects. The focus here should be 1) educating the youth appropriately 2) Educating the general public on how to keep the products out of the hands of the youth, 3) Taking necessary precautions to ensure the products remain out of their reach.

    • From JCSisyphus

      You're so very right. It's an individual lacking in comprehensive education about the industry trying to score easy political points. Look at these fancy names, won't someone think of the children!?

      Yes we should think of the children, by educating them properly about responsible consumption, not banning strain names as if that will somehow accomplish something.

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Parents and Teachers Group 4 months ago

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Hamilton school board tweaks pot education rollout

Hamilton school board tweaks pot education rollout  HamiltonNewsFull coverage

https://www.hamiltonnews.com/news-story/8938223-hamilto...

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James Parents and Teachers Group 2 months ago / Hamilton, Ontario


What has changed? The effects of legalization on our classrooms.

As a high school teacher in a suburban public school, legalization has meant that more and more of my students have had information about cannabis thrust upon them by their peers, parents, teachers, and the media. I have a mandate to help them navigate life as individuals and teach them how to judge these sources of information for their inherent biases. But where do we turn for information in the ‘age of information’?

In spite of the internet’s scope, I am still the primary source of knowledge for the students in my classroom, which means I have to be informed first before answering their questions. My goal is to direct opinions towards ideas and facts. These make stronger and better-informed opinions, and stronger individuals, too! I think most teachers seek this same kind of objectivity in their classroom; my job is not to pontificate but to inform and help students learn for themselves.

How do we respond to students’ questions about cannabis? How are we keeping the messages from our school administrators and fellow teachers consistent? How can we maintain a healthy dialogue about cannabis without appearing permissive?

What do you say?

The other day, a student in my English class remarked that legalization looked like “a bad idea” for Canada. For him, the prospect of a legalizing a drugappeared—on its surface—like something bad. I mean, by thatrationale, can you blame him? Drugs are bad, right?

But I like to keep myself informed. I didn’t outrightly deny his claims. I didn’t really support them either. I just told him what I know to be true about cannabis: industry will try sell cannabis, they’ll sell it at particular places, people will use it, and law and order will adapt to a new climate under legalization.

I told him, for example, that it’s illegal for people under the age of 19 to buy cannabis (in Ontario). I told him that one of the proposed benefits of legalization is that researchers can begin testing its effects on humans, and any of its supposed benefits and risks can be weighed using the scientific method, moving it beyond experience and public opinion. I also told him that the Ontario Cannabis Store (the provincially owned shop, and sole proprietor for recreational cannabis in Ontario) is opening stores in 2019 to supplement online traffic.

Did I change his mind about anything? I’m not sure. I didn’t want to. But I do know that his comment brought on a slew of opinions and through-the-grape-vine comments from his classmates. “I heard that marijuana stores aren’t opening until next year.” “Can weed cure seizures?” Yeah! My brother gets seizures but he smokes a ton of pot.” “Is the legal age to buy cannabis the same everywhere?”

In my eyes, this episode was another in a long list of healthy conversations. My students have always felt safe to speak about topics for which they’re interested. I don’t care whether that’s video games, dance, weightlifting, the process of selecting a jury, cats, Cardi B, or cannabis. I have to be prepared with the wherewithal to respond and guide discussions, not stifle it.

What has changed?

This has happened again and again over the last year, and my sense is that it’s going to continue into the future. Most kids have a finger on the pulse of political and public life, even if that finger is a little tentatively outstretched and shaky (and easily distracted by their iPad). They sense that there has been a seismic shift, and it’s happening right in front of their very eyes.

Remember, too, that we teachers are mandated to teach the curriculum. That curriculum hasn’t changed since legalization. Not yet at least. Our messaging is supposed to remain consistent. It’s policy. But I’ve been getting the sense that even the students recognize how there has a been a seismic shift, and it’s happening right before their very eyes, and we have to be prepared faster than the law and policymakers to step up and answer their questions or guide their thinking. Many of our students—especially those in high school—are only a few years away from being voters, consumers, and dissenters. And by the time they’re in our classrooms, their civic engagement has already begun.

In all this, my job remains same: teach and inspire kids to learn and grow.

Related comments

  • From Michael Joseph

    Thank you, James for sharing your experience as a teacher in the era of cannabis legalization in Canada. Your practice, and approach is truly inspiring.

  • From Janelle Simone

    Super insightful James. I never took the time to think about the impact on teachers and the education system. I applaud you for not trying to sway them any direction but simply get them to think about varying angles. You sound like an awesome teacher, keep up the great work!

  • From KellyP

    Excellent article James!! Parents and teachers are all learning how to deal with legalization in Canada. We are going to have to educate ourselves the best we can so we can properly inform our children/students when they have questions.

    • From Michael Joseph

      Very well said. Students and children need guidance from their parents and teachers more than ever.

  • From Connor Christine

    Wow. What a great stance to take as a teacher. I hope that we can share this article and get as many teachers to see it as possible! If all educators could take the same view as you, we will definitely be headed in the right direction. Right now is a crucial time to help youth understand what they’re hearing in the news, on the radio and in media in general, and let them know that it’s okay to ask questions. Thanks for sharing James!

  • From ChrisS

    Thanks for the great article James, I also have not thought about the impact this will have on teachers. We need more teachers like you who educate by giving all the information without personal bias.

  • From DRogerson

    James - thank you for this post. The questions that you pose are meaningful to all educators alike. As a teacher myself, it is important to remember our responsibility as educators to keep ourselves informed and to give our students the tools that they need to learn for themselves!

  • From Kimr

    I also never took the time to think about how this would impact teachers.
    James your students are very fortunate that you are their teacher. It’s awesome that they feel comfortable enough with you that they can ask these questions. It’s so important that they are informed with the facts about Cannabis.

  • From faheem

    I read your post from the perspective of a parent. I guess the same approach is to be used when discussing cannabis with our kids, i.e. direct them towards ideas and facts, teach them to learn for themselves and to be responsible (and inspiring) members of society. Thanks for your insights.

JADEO Parents and Teachers Group 3 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


[VIDEO] How to Talk to Your Kids About Cannabis

Not sure how to approach talking to your kids about Cannabis? Watch this great informational video from Health Canada for tips on how to get the conversation started.


The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.


-

Stay informed. Stay healthy.
#WeAreJadeo

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JADEO Parents and Teachers Group 7 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


10 Helpful Resources Parents and Teachers Need to Know

At one time, the thought of youth using cannabis was considered shocking and a crime. While it's still illegal for kids under 18 to consume cannabis on a recreational basis, kids can take medicinal cannabis with permission. However, cannabis abuse within the youth population is still prevalent in Canada.

To keep on top of this issue, parents and teachers need to turn to Canadian resources they can trust to help find solutions for cannabis abuse and to maintain safety.

How can you really talk to youth about the positives and negatives of marijuana? Take a look at these tips and resources to help kids get a better cannabis education.

1. Drug Free Kids at Canada.org

A worthwhile resource to help educate kids on cannabis is Drug Free Kids, a comprehensive site full of eye-opening statistics for parents and teachers to research.

One standout here is the site's Cannabis Talk Kit, providing a downloadable e-book for parents and teachers to use in educating kids about cannabis use.

Health Canada also provides printed copies of this book.

2. The CCSA

Otherwise known as The Canadian Centre On Substance Use and Addiction, the CCSA is a leading resource in Canada to help educate youth on abusing cannabis.

According to their statistics, cannabis is the most used illegal drug by Canadian youth aged 15-24. They also say the use of the drug by these age groups are two and a half times that of adults 25 and older.

CCSA is an excellent resource to find out about the health dangers of cannabis on the brains of children. The organization continues to provide educational materials to help kids, plus doing research to determine the realities of what cannabis continues to do when illegally consumed.

3. Canadian Paediatric Society

This organization aims to protect and promote the health and well-being of youth. They have their own page on cannabis and youth that touches on the health impact of cannabis use. One thing they hone in on is cannabis and how it affects the adolescent brain.

A form of drug dependence, Cannabis Use Disorder (CUD) is also discussed. CPS ultimately realizes the potential risks in brain development in kids if they take cannabis early. Debates still go on, though, on when the most appropriate age is for cannabis consumption.

4. Cannabis & Psychosis

The mental aspects of kids using cannabis needs exploring as well. Through Cannabis & Psychosis, you have yet another Canadian resource offering information on how cannabis affects kids psychologically.

C&P deems themselves a hub of innovative, experiential, and scientific information on making proper decisions about cannabis use. It's geared for youth, families, educators, and community partners.

5. NICHE

This organization is the National Institute for Cannabis Health and Education. Canadian-based, NICHE provides a lot of great tips on health and safety related to youth and cannabis usage. On their webpage, they provide numerous links to some of the above sites, as well as governmental information on current Canadian cannabis laws.

6. HeretoHelp

On this site, you have a valuable mix of mental health and substance abuse information you can absolutely trust. Here you'll find medical articles debunking many misconceptions.

To decipher facts from fiction, their youth guide for parents has boxes with "It's commonly claimed that...", followed by "But research suggests that..." in each section.

7. Ottawa Public Health

Those of you living in Ottawa should use the Ottawa Public Health page to find some good tips on how to talk to teens about cannabis use.

You'll even find information on Ottawa's upcoming plans for making cannabis legal as it relates to protecting the youth.

8. The Conversation

When you visit The Conversation, you'll get more in-depth analysis of how Canada's legalization of cannabis affects Canadian youth. While cannabis won't be sold to anyone under 18, the concerns are still out there of being unable to stop kids from using the drug.

You'll find some great tips here on how to prepare your family or students by educating yourself and teenagers.

9. Make Connections

Through Make Connections, you'll find a great collection of information on cannabis for those in Manitoba. Otherwise known as the Manitoba Addictions Knowledge Exchange, you'll find more printed resources telling about the dangers of cannabis.

Recently, they put together a youth video contest to help residents create a 30-90 second video explaining why kids shouldn't use drugs and find safer alternatives than drug use to manage life.

10. Canadian Students for Sensible Drug Policy (CSSDP)

Yet another Canadian resource worth utilizing is a toolkit for educating youth. It was provided by the CSSDP, which is a network of youth and students with concerns about the negative impact drug policies have on individuals and communities.

Having this come from the perspective of Canadian youth gives it a unique angle. It allows parents and educators the opportunity to see things from a teen's perspective to better prepare them for conversations on the topic.

Remember to always consult your doctor before beginning any type of wellness treatment.

-

Stay informed. Stay healthy. 

#WeAreJadeo

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