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A good night's rest can help boost performance and productivity. Join this group to learn about the promising therapeutic potential available in the market for insomnia and other sleep disturbances. Your safety is important to us. Always seek medical advice from your own doctor before starting any wellness treatment and report any violations of our posting standards. Stay Informed. Stay Healthy.

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Janelle Simone Sleep 5 days ago / Scarborough, Ontario

Today I got diagnosed with obtrusive sleep apnea. In some areas of the world sleep apnea is a condition that qualifies for a medical cannabis prescription, though there's much divide over whether it is an effective treatment. Curious if anybody has used cannabis for sleep apnea?

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  • From 22

    I have and use Blue Star 2 oil from Starseed and i get a nice deep sleep and wake up great! But dont take it close to going to bed; can make you groggy in morning; take it 2-3 before... i take 1ml

    • From Janelle Simone

      Oh great! Will definitely look into trying and this and see how it works with me.

      • From Connor Christine

        I had a great experience at the North Star Wellness Clinic in Hamilton. You should check them out!

    • From Brianne Campbell

      Ahh taking it 2-3 hours before bed is a great idea!

JADEO Sleep 2 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


How Manual Labour Affects Your Sleep

Regular exercise is associated with better sleep, so it’s natural to assume that physically demanding jobs might also enhance the sleep experience. It turns out, however, that compared to those who have low-activity jobs (working at a call center or as a computer programmer, for example), people who perform manual labor for a living (construction workers, farmers, and others) have a higher prevalence of sleep disturbances. Fortunately, there are steps you can take to combat the unique sleep challenges of manual labor and make sure your sleep is sound.

Why Manual Labor Sometimes Equals Less Sleep

The fact that physical jobs are correlated with more sleep disturbances may be because manual labor can lead to musculoskeletal pain, which can make it tough to relax enough to fall asleep. It’s also possible that some higher-activity jobs, like being a firefighter, can be stressful, and greater stress has been linked with difficulty falling and staying asleep.

Why Sleep Matters

Healthy sleep is very important for your health and for your productivity on the job. You need sleep in order to feel energized during the day, and to decrease the chance of health conditions such as heart disease and weight gain.

How to Make Sure Your Sleep Is Sound

Though it is unlikely that you can choose your hours around your sleep schedule, you can maximize the quantity and quality of sleep that you do get. Talk with your doctor about strategies that could lead to improved sleep. For example, activities that reduce stress levels—such as relaxation exercises , meditating, cannabis, or winding down at night with a bath and good book—could help you fall asleep faster and get more hours of sleep.

Source: The National Sleep Foundation

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JADEO Sleep 2 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


Beyond CPAP: Could Medical Cannabis Treat Sleep Apnea?

Source: Sleep Review: The Journal For Sleep Specialists
By Lisa Spear

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a molecule found in cannabis that is commonly known for its psychoactive properties, could be a viable therapy for obstructive sleep apnea, but research in this area is still in its infancy.

The Minnesota Department of Health approved medical cannabis for the treatment of sleep apnea last year. This means that in August the first sleep apnea patients were able to obtain medical cannabis under state law, though it remains classified as an illegal Schedule 1 narcotic on the federal level. While some providers feel the state’s decision is a step in the right direction, it has ignited a debate among sleep medicine physicians about whether there is enough evidence of the plant’s effectiveness to recommend its use for patient populations.

Not long after the department’s announcement, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) came forward with a statement against the use of medical cannabis for sleep apnea.¹ “We do not have enough data to tell us if it is OK to use it at this point,” says Kannan Ramar, MBBS, MD, professor of medicine in the division of pulmonary and critical care medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

In a brief, the Minnesota Department of Health cited recent research, including a clinical trial on dronabinol, synthetic THC that has been used for years to prevent nausea in chemotherapy patients.² The medication was a new approach to the treatment of sleep apnea because it targeted the brain instead of the physical problem of collapsing airways. This reflects the new idea that sleep apnea is not just a physical problem but may be caused by several factors, including poor regulation of the upper airway muscles by the brain. The study from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) and Northwestern Medicine was published in the journal SLEEP in 2017.³

Dronabinol had positive outcomes in some subjects, possibly by increasing airway muscle tone. After six weeks of treatment, patients experienced fewer episodes of shallow breathing and apneas throughout the night. The primary outcome was that dronabinol decreased the severity of the disorder (as assessed by the apnea-hypopnea index) by 33% of the pretreatment value, on average among all subjects.

The researchers think that dronabinol works by binding to cannabinoid receptors on the nerves that regulate the upper airway muscles. This inhibits activation of the vagus nerve, which increases muscle activity to stop airway collapse during sleep, says the principal investigator of the study, David Carley, PhD, a professor of biobehavioral health sciences, medicine, and bioengineering at UIC.

He cautions that while this work could lead to new treatments for sleep apnea, the promising results of the study do not apply directly to the cannabis plant in its natural form—since dronabinol was studied in isolation. Any reference to his research to justify the approval of medical cannabis is taking his work out of context, Carley says, since cannabis plants contain over a hundred biologically active molecules that interact with one another.

The drug dronabinol contains just one biologically active molecule. Further research is needed to fully understand how other molecules found in cannabis plants might impact patients with sleep apnea, says Carley.

“I’m not saying that it wouldn’t be or couldn’t be therapeutic; I’m saying that we don’t have any data on that yet,” he says. “There is a lot more work that needs to be done.”

Research manager in the Minnesota Department of Health’s Office of Medical Cannabis, Thomas Arneson, MD, MPH, agrees. The former Minnesota Commissioner of Health Ed Ehlinger, MD, MSPH, made the decision to give sleep apnea patients the freedom to try medical cannabis to see if it works for them on an individual basis, but patients should still use caution, says Arneson.

“If you choose to use some cannabis products, bear in mind, that there is very little research evidence that shows that it works, and if you do use it make sure to check back in with your healthcare provider to make sure it is working for you,” he says.

In the dronabinol study, the researchers found significant improvement in the objective measures of severity of obstructive sleep apnea compared to the participants who took placebos. The subjects’ breathing during sleep and daytime alertness improved. These are positive signals that dronabinol, at least, potentially has a therapeutic, positive effect in patients with obstructive sleep apnea, says Carley.

A drug that treats the cause of sleep apnea could one day give patients more options to manage their condition. “The CPAP device targets the physical problem but not the cause,” says co-lead author Phyllis Zee, MD, in a release. “The drug targets the brain and nerves that regulate the upper airway muscles. It alters the neurotransmitters from the brain that communicate with the muscles. Better understanding of this will help us develop more effective and personalized treatments for sleep apnea.”

New cannabis therapies for sleep apnea are already on the horizon. Nasal respiratory and sleep technology company Rhinomed recently announced that it is partnering with the medical cannabis company Columbia Care to develop a product that can be administered through the nose with a nasal stent during sleep. The investigational cannabis product would treat several qualifying conditions, including obstructive sleep apnea.

“It is administered almost like a dermal patch, but inside the nose. What we can do is we can deliver a very set amount over a set period of time,” says Michael Johnson, CEO of Rhinomed. “And because it is going directly into the blood, into your circulatory system, we can actually use a much lower amount to achieve a clinical outcome than if you were to swallow it.”

This could offer an alternative to CPAP therapy. “That’s really interesting to us because certainly compliance rates with CPAP are under 40%. It’s an expensive therapy, patients don’t really like it, and yet there’s been no innovation in the sector for a long time,” says Johnson. “Here is an opportunity, potentially, to create a whole new mode of therapy that actually doesn’t treat the symptom of sleep apnea, but actually goes to ask the question: What is the underlying cause, what is the underlying reason why people have apnea?”

References

1. Ramar K, Rosen IM, Kirsch DB, et al. Medical Cannabis and the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An American Academy of Sleep Medicine Position Statement. J Clin Sleep Med. 2018 Apr 15;14(4):679-81.

2. Minnesota Department of Health. Issue Brief on Obstructive Sleep Apnea. 2017 Sept. Available at www.health.state.mn.us/topics/cannabis/rulemaking/sleepapneabrief.pdf.

3. Carley DW, Prasad B, Reid KJ, et al. Pharmacotherapy of apnea by cannabimimetic enhancement, the PACE clinical trial: effects of dronabinol in obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep. 2018 Jan 1;41(1).

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JADEO Sleep 2 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


Why Lack Of Sleep Is Bad For Your Health

Many effects of a lack of sleep, such as feeling grumpy and not working at your best, are well known. But did you know that sleep deprivation can also have profound consequences on your physical health?

One in 3 of us suffers from poor sleep, with stress, computers and taking work home often blamed.

However, the cost of all those sleepless nights is more than just bad moods and a lack of focus.

Regular poor sleep puts you at risk of serious medical conditions, including obesity, heart disease and diabetes – and it shortens your life expectancy.

It's now clear that a solid night's sleep is essential for a long and healthy life.

How much sleep do we need?

Most of us need around 8 hours of good-quality sleep a night to function properly – but some need more and some less. What matters is that you find out how much sleep you need and then try to achieve it.

As a general rule, if you wake up tired and spend the day longing for a chance to have a nap, it's likely that you're not getting enough sleep.

A variety of factors can cause poor sleep, including health conditions such as sleep apnoea. But in most cases, it's due to bad sleeping habits.

What happens if I don't sleep?

Everyone's experienced the fatigue, short temper and lack of focus that often follow a poor night's sleep.

An occasional night without sleep makes you feel tired and irritable the next day, but it won't harm your health.

After several sleepless nights, the mental effects become more serious. Your brain will fog, making it difficult to concentrate and make decisions. You'll start to feel down, and may fall asleep during the day. Your risk of injury and accidents at home, work and on the road also increases.

If it continues, lack of sleep can affect your overall health and make you prone to serious medical conditions, such as obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes.

Here are 7 ways in which a good night's sleep can boost your health:

1. Sleep boosts immunity

If you seem to catch every cold and flu that's going around, your bedtime could be to blame. Prolonged lack of sleep can disrupt your immune system, so you're less able to fend off bugs.

2. Sleep can slim you

Sleeping less may mean you put on weight! Studies have shown that people who sleep less than 7 hours a day tend to gain more weight and have a higher risk of becoming obese than those who get 7 hours of slumber.

It's believed to be because sleep-deprived people have reduced levels of leptin (the chemical that makes you feel full) and increased levels of ghrelin (the hunger-stimulating hormone).

3. Sleep boosts mental wellbeing

Given that a single sleepless night can make you irritable and moody the following day, it's not surprising that chronic sleep debt may lead to long-term mood disorders like depression and anxiety.

When people with anxiety or depression were surveyed to calculate their sleeping habits, it turned out that most of them slept for less than 6 hours a night.

4. Sleep prevents diabetes

Studies have suggested that people who usually sleep less than 5 hours a night have an increased risk of developing diabetes.

It seems that missing out on deep sleep may lead to type 2 diabetes by changing the way the body processes glucose, which the body uses for energy.

5. Sleep increases sex drive

Men and women who don't get enough quality sleep have lower libidos and less of an interest in sex, research suggests.

Men who suffer from sleep apnoea – a disorder in which breathing difficulties lead to interrupted sleep – also tend to have lower testosterone levels, which can lower libido.

6. Sleep wards off heart disease

Long-standing sleep deprivation seems to be associated with increased heart rate, an increase in blood pressure and higher levels of certain chemicals linked with inflammation, which may put extra strain on your heart.

7. Sleep increases fertility

Difficulty conceiving a baby has been claimed as one of the effects of sleep deprivation, in both men and women. Apparently, regular sleep disruptions can cause trouble conceiving by reducing the secretion of reproductive hormones.

How to catch up on lost sleep

If you don't get enough sleep, there's only one way to compensate – getting more sleep.

It won't happen with a single early night. If you've had months of restricted sleep, you'll have built up a significant sleep debt, so expect recovery to take several weeks.

Starting on a weekend, try to add on an extra hour or 2 of sleep a night. The way to do this is to go to bed when you're tired, and allow your body to wake you in the morning (no alarm clocks allowed!).

Expect to sleep for upwards of 10 hours a night at first. After a while, the amount of time you sleep will gradually decrease to a normal level.

Don't rely on caffeine or energy drinks as a short-term pick-me-up. They may boost your energy and concentration temporarily, but can disrupt your sleep patterns even further in the long term.

Source: National Health Service UK

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JADEO Sleep 2 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


Can CBD Help You Sleep Better? How CBD Treats Insomnia (VIDEO)

We love the way Thomas DeLauer discusses CBD and sleep, and breaks down how CBD treats sleep disorders like insomnia.

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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

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#WeAreJADEO

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  • From 22

    Good info...

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JADEO Sleep 2 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


11 Tips For Healthy Sleep

Healthy sleep habits can make a big difference in your quality of life. Having healthy sleep habits is often referred to as having good sleep hygiene. In an effort to achieve good sleep hygiene and get a good nights rest, try to maintain following sleep practices on a consistent basis:

1. Stick to a sleep schedule of the same bedtime and wake up time, even on the weekends.

This helps to regulate your body's clock and could help you fall asleep and stay asleep for the night.

2. Practice a relaxing bedtime ritual.

A relaxing, routine activity right before bedtime conducted away from bright lights helps separate your sleep time from activities that can cause excitement, stress or anxiety which can make it more difficult to fall asleep, get sound and deep sleep or remain asleep.

3. If you have trouble sleeping, avoid naps, especially in the afternoon.

Power napping may help you get through the day, but if you find that you can't fall asleep at bedtime, eliminating even short catnaps may help.

4. Exercise daily.

Vigorous exercise is best, but even light exercise is better than no activity. Exercise at any time of day, but not at the expense of your sleep.

5. Evaluate your room.

Design your sleep environment to establish the conditions you need for sleep. Your bedroom should be cool –between 60 and 67 degrees. Your bedroom should also be free from any noise that can disturb your sleep. Finally, your bedroom should be free from any light. Check your room for noises or other distractions. This includes a bed partner's sleep disruptions such as snoring. Consider using blackout curtains, eye shades, ear plugs, "white noise" machines, humidifiers, fans and other devices.

6. Sleep on a comfortable mattress and pillows.

Make sure your mattress is comfortable and supportive. The one you have been using for years may have exceeded its life expectancy – about 9 or 10 years for most good quality mattresses. Have comfortable pillows and make the room attractive and inviting for sleep but also free of allergens that might affect you and objects that might cause you to slip or fall if you have to get up

7. Use bright light to help manage your circadian rhythms.

Avoid bright light in the evening and expose yourself to sunlight in the morning. This will keep your circadian rhythms in check.

8. Avoid alcohol, cigarettes, and heavy meals in the evening.

Alcohol, cigarettes and caffeine can disrupt sleep. Eating big or spicy meals can cause discomfort from indigestion that can make it hard to sleep. If you can, avoid eating large meals for two to three hours before bedtime. Try a light snack 45 minutes before bed if you’re still hungry.

9. Wind down.

Your body needs time to shift into sleep mode, so spend the last hour before bed doing a calming activity such as reading. For some people, using an electronic device such as a laptop can make it hard to fall asleep, because the particular type of light emanating from the screens of these devices is activating to the brain. If you have trouble sleeping, avoid electronics before bed or in the middle of the night.

10. If you can't sleep, go into another room and do something relaxing until you feel tired.

It is best to take work materials, computers and televisions out of the sleeping environment. Use your bed only for sleep and sex to strengthen the association between bed and sleep. If you associate a particular activity or item with anxiety about sleeping, omit it from your bedtime routine.

11. If you’re still having trouble sleeping

Don’t hesitate to speak with your doctor or to find a sleep professional. You may also benefit from recording your sleep in a Sleep Diary to help you better evaluate common patterns or issues you may see with your sleep or sleeping habits.

Source: The National Sleep Foundation

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Stay Informed. Stay Healthy.
#WeAreJADEO

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  • From Burge

    Wow, this is great. I need to follow some of these...

    • From Janelle Simone

      Agreed!

JADEO Sleep 3 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


The Science Of Smell In A Good Night’s Sleep

Sleep hygiene is a concept that is getting more attention in recent years, something that can play a key role for insomnia sufferers in getting a good night’s sleep. As we all know, getting a good night’s sleep is key to being able to focus during the day, so we wanted to do a deeper dive into the nuances of herbal medicine to support JADEO readers on their quest for deep, therapeutic rest!

Sleep experts typically recommend creating a soothing sleep environment devoid of electronic distractions, avoiding caffeine and other stimulants in the hours before bed, and establishing a nighttime routine. These habits can all help you achieve that sought after well-rested feeling in the morning.

Our recent deep dive into cannabinoids for sleep illuminated the role of CBN, a little-known cannabinoid with medically identified sedative effects. Because a good night’s rest is so important for overall health and healing, we wanted to explore further and look at what other herbal therapies go hand in hand with cannabis for sleep?

Best Terpenes For A Calming, Sedating Effect


The tweet from Green Relief is true! Scientists are working to demystify the effects of terpenes on properties of cannabis, and as they uncover more of the connection between the scent profiles and powers of the plant, we can use their findings to select the best weed strains for sleep.

First, you may be wondering - what are terpenes?

Terpenes can be defined as “any of a large group of volatile unsaturated hydrocarbons found in the essential oils of plants, especially conifers and citrus trees” and can be found in the same glands that produce THC and CBD.

Female cannabis plants, especially, produce trichomes (the small fuzzy and crystal-like) hairs found on buds, which produce THC, CBD, flavonoids, and terpenes.

Terpenes, not only give your smoke its aroma and colour, but terpenes are also known to have a variety of medicinal attributes that are anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory and can benefit people suffering from the likes of asthma, depression, chronic pain, and much more.

While we are discovering that a range of terpenes are good for anxiety or nervousness, one particular terpene, called myrcene, is known to have a sedating effect which is helpful to induce sleep. Also found in mangos, lemongrass and thyme - it’s benefits include pain reduction, relief from inflammation and antioxidant properties.

Best Essential Oils For Sleep + Relaxation

As mentioned, the terpenes in cannabis are found in the essential oils of many other plants. Many of these plants have had traditional medicinal uses for hundreds of years. Some of these traditional medicinal uses include calming or sleep-inducing effects. Some of the popular favourites are found in lavender, chamomile, ylang-ylang, neroli, and cedarwood.

Best Herbal Teas or Tinctures For Sleep

Not surprisingly using many of the same herbs in teas and tinctures can also help lull you to sleep. In addition to common herbs lavender and chamomile, we suggest strong herbs that may not have as pleasing aromatic profiles, such as passionflower, valerian or hops to help knock you out. Both infusing herbs as a tea or taking them orally as a potent extraction (tincture) are wonderful ways to use the power of natural medicine to guide the body to a restful state. Combining the powers of herbal medicine with optimal sleep hygiene practices should send you well on your way to restful zzzs.


Remember to always consult a medical professional before starting any new health care regimen.

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#WeAreJADEO

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  • From 22

    Absolutely

JADEO Sleep 4 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


Cannabis And Sleep: Is CDB And/Or THC The Answer To Your Sleep Woes?

It’s an issue that affects us all; quality and duration of sleep. Whether you’re a busy 9-5er, a relaxed retiree or anywhere in between, it can be hard to get your recommended seven hours a day. While humans have been using puffs of Indica's to help lull into a bedtime slumber for thousands of years, new medical research is beginning to back that adding cannabis as a sleep aid has the potential to help with any short-term sleep troubles.

While we know certain strains of cannabis can be used as a sedative and sleep agent, the jury is still out on what formulation uniquely treats difficulty sleeping. THC and CBD have alternating effects on sleep depending on dosage. Anecdotal and research evidence hasn’t given us great guidelines on exact measured milligram levels, although a 1:1 mixture of both has been shown to have maximum sleep benefit in people suffering from chronic pain, according to a 2017 review on the role of cannabinoids in sleep disorders.

Less Isn't Always More

Based on the research that has been done so far, there is counter-intuitive information that shows you can be fooled by common assumptions around cannabis and sleep. For example, high dose CBD has been shown to help with sleep, but low dose CBD has been shown to have stimulant effects. Studies in both humans and mice which administered lower doses of CBD demonstrated increased wakefulness. Another study of medical cannabis users found that users treating insomnia were more likely to use high dose CBD strains. More research needs to be done on exact dosing, but these insights can bring medical cannabis consumers the insight needed to use CBD effectively for a good night's sleep.

Know Your Cannabinoids

Researcher Dr. Evan Russo identified sedative effects in the cannabinoid known as cannabinol (CBN), which is found in smokable flower in increasing concentrations over time through the oxidation of THC. She argues that the sativa and indica designations are useless, and recommends focusing on cannabinoid content instead - promoting the quest for higher levels of CBN in a strain designated for sleep.

Watch Your Tolerance

Sleep latency is a key benefit of cannabis for sleep, meaning it can help you fall asleep more quickly, and stay asleep longer. Short-term cannabis use can help you fall asleep faster, but for some people, that’s not always the case. Some early studies point to the development of tolerance to the sedative effects in some people who report long-term cannabis usage.

Practice Makes Perfect?

Different modes of ingestion yield different effects, so consider trying an oil and a flower vape while you test out what works best for you. We know that in general, ingesting cannabis orally has a prolonged, body-high effect that is uneven in onset, while inhaling cannabis has a more immediate and pronounced impact on your body. Personalized treatment for sleep, as with any condition, is the best way to achieve optimal results.

So, does cannabis improve or cure sleep deficiencies? The verdict is still officially out on that as more research needs to be done. However, current research does prove it can provide some relief to a number of individuals.

Remember to always consult a medical professional before starting any new health care regimen.

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Stay Informed. Stay Healthy

#WeAreJADEO

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  • From Romes_416

    It helps me sleep for sure!

Michael Joseph Sleep 2 months ago / Hamilton , Ontario

Cannabis has been apart of large discussions nowadays in regards to sleep. What are your thoughts, or experiences with cannabis and sleep? What are you using, CBD or THC, or THC&CBD? How are you using it?

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  • From EatSleepRun

    When I have a tough time falling asleep, I have a piece of THC infused (indica) chocolate and usually pass right out. I’ve been wondering though if I’m getting a true sleep or just losing consciousness.

    • From Burge

      I would imagine you would be getting a good rest. Once the chocolate is metabolized, your body and mind are relaxed, making you drift off into your sleep. For me, I'm pretty basic, I tend to put a heavy indica dominant strain in the vape, and take a couple puffs about 30 minutes before I am ready to sleep. Has worked like a charm! :)

      • From EatSleepRun

        I should try that. Probably much more efficient than waiting for chocolate to metabolize!!

JADEO Sleep 3 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


[VIDEO] Can Medical Cannabis be effective for sleep apnea, insomnia and other sleep disturbances?

Is Your Lack of Sleep Impacting Your Daily Performance?

You might have heard of medical cannabis and its association to sleep, but we want you to hear real data and research from a doctor with experience. In this video with Dr. Rachna Patel, who is based out of California, she reads a personal letter from Bill regarding his sleep disturbances and discusses her findings with patients she's treated with medical cannabis. What did she find? Watch below to learn.

The Video above is owned by Dr. Rachna Patel.

If you liked this, you should check out JADEO's article on Is Cannabis A Quality Sleep Aid?


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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

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Stay informed. Stay healthy.
#WeAreJadeo

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Shared by Lindsay Le Blanc

Lindsay Le Blanc Mental Health 3 months ago / Toronto, Ontario

Have you ever been tired and wired? It's something I struggle with when I have nervous exhaustion. Sometimes I'm like a kid on Christmas and can't sleep even though I'm fatigued. I'm tempted to believe that's why Mother Nature created indicas! https://jadeo.co/SIG/Sleep/is-cannabis-a-quality-sleep-aid

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Is Cannabis A Quality Sleep Aid?

JADEO

Is Cannabis A Quality Sleep Aid?

https://jadeo.co/SIG/Sleep/is-cannabis-a-quality-sleep-...

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JADEO Sleep 3 months ago / Toronto, Ontario

Lack of sleep got you down? Could cannabis be the answer? Read and find out! https://jadeo.co/SIG/Sleep/is-cannabis-a-quality-sleep-aid

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Is Cannabis A Quality Sleep Aid?

JADEO

Many people are not comfortable taking traditional, pharmaceutical "sleeping pills" that you would get from your pharmacy. If you're opting to skip your Lunesta, Sonata, Ambien, or Halcion, there are a variety of other option

https://jadeo.co/SIG/Sleep/is-cannabis-a-quality-sleep-...

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  • From JCSisyphus

    This is 100% how I started consuming cannabis, I've not yet found a better non-habit forming sleep aid and pain reliever.

    • From Janelle Simone

      I have to agree. Ever since trying it, my quality of sleep has improved so much!

JADEO Sleep 2 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


How Manual Labour Affects Your Sleep

Regular exercise is associated with better sleep, so it’s natural to assume that physically demanding jobs might also enhance the sleep experience. It turns out, however, that compared to those who have low-activity jobs (working at a call center or as a computer programmer, for example), people who perform manual labor for a living (construction workers, farmers, and others) have a higher prevalence of sleep disturbances. Fortunately, there are steps you can take to combat the unique sleep challenges of manual labor and make sure your sleep is sound.

Why Manual Labor Sometimes Equals Less Sleep

The fact that physical jobs are correlated with more sleep disturbances may be because manual labor can lead to musculoskeletal pain, which can make it tough to relax enough to fall asleep. It’s also possible that some higher-activity jobs, like being a firefighter, can be stressful, and greater stress has been linked with difficulty falling and staying asleep.

Why Sleep Matters

Healthy sleep is very important for your health and for your productivity on the job. You need sleep in order to feel energized during the day, and to decrease the chance of health conditions such as heart disease and weight gain.

How to Make Sure Your Sleep Is Sound

Though it is unlikely that you can choose your hours around your sleep schedule, you can maximize the quantity and quality of sleep that you do get. Talk with your doctor about strategies that could lead to improved sleep. For example, activities that reduce stress levels—such as relaxation exercises , meditating, cannabis, or winding down at night with a bath and good book—could help you fall asleep faster and get more hours of sleep.

Source: The National Sleep Foundation

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JADEO Sleep 2 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


Beyond CPAP: Could Medical Cannabis Treat Sleep Apnea?

Source: Sleep Review: The Journal For Sleep Specialists
By Lisa Spear

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a molecule found in cannabis that is commonly known for its psychoactive properties, could be a viable therapy for obstructive sleep apnea, but research in this area is still in its infancy.

The Minnesota Department of Health approved medical cannabis for the treatment of sleep apnea last year. This means that in August the first sleep apnea patients were able to obtain medical cannabis under state law, though it remains classified as an illegal Schedule 1 narcotic on the federal level. While some providers feel the state’s decision is a step in the right direction, it has ignited a debate among sleep medicine physicians about whether there is enough evidence of the plant’s effectiveness to recommend its use for patient populations.

Not long after the department’s announcement, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) came forward with a statement against the use of medical cannabis for sleep apnea.¹ “We do not have enough data to tell us if it is OK to use it at this point,” says Kannan Ramar, MBBS, MD, professor of medicine in the division of pulmonary and critical care medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

In a brief, the Minnesota Department of Health cited recent research, including a clinical trial on dronabinol, synthetic THC that has been used for years to prevent nausea in chemotherapy patients.² The medication was a new approach to the treatment of sleep apnea because it targeted the brain instead of the physical problem of collapsing airways. This reflects the new idea that sleep apnea is not just a physical problem but may be caused by several factors, including poor regulation of the upper airway muscles by the brain. The study from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) and Northwestern Medicine was published in the journal SLEEP in 2017.³

Dronabinol had positive outcomes in some subjects, possibly by increasing airway muscle tone. After six weeks of treatment, patients experienced fewer episodes of shallow breathing and apneas throughout the night. The primary outcome was that dronabinol decreased the severity of the disorder (as assessed by the apnea-hypopnea index) by 33% of the pretreatment value, on average among all subjects.

The researchers think that dronabinol works by binding to cannabinoid receptors on the nerves that regulate the upper airway muscles. This inhibits activation of the vagus nerve, which increases muscle activity to stop airway collapse during sleep, says the principal investigator of the study, David Carley, PhD, a professor of biobehavioral health sciences, medicine, and bioengineering at UIC.

He cautions that while this work could lead to new treatments for sleep apnea, the promising results of the study do not apply directly to the cannabis plant in its natural form—since dronabinol was studied in isolation. Any reference to his research to justify the approval of medical cannabis is taking his work out of context, Carley says, since cannabis plants contain over a hundred biologically active molecules that interact with one another.

The drug dronabinol contains just one biologically active molecule. Further research is needed to fully understand how other molecules found in cannabis plants might impact patients with sleep apnea, says Carley.

“I’m not saying that it wouldn’t be or couldn’t be therapeutic; I’m saying that we don’t have any data on that yet,” he says. “There is a lot more work that needs to be done.”

Research manager in the Minnesota Department of Health’s Office of Medical Cannabis, Thomas Arneson, MD, MPH, agrees. The former Minnesota Commissioner of Health Ed Ehlinger, MD, MSPH, made the decision to give sleep apnea patients the freedom to try medical cannabis to see if it works for them on an individual basis, but patients should still use caution, says Arneson.

“If you choose to use some cannabis products, bear in mind, that there is very little research evidence that shows that it works, and if you do use it make sure to check back in with your healthcare provider to make sure it is working for you,” he says.

In the dronabinol study, the researchers found significant improvement in the objective measures of severity of obstructive sleep apnea compared to the participants who took placebos. The subjects’ breathing during sleep and daytime alertness improved. These are positive signals that dronabinol, at least, potentially has a therapeutic, positive effect in patients with obstructive sleep apnea, says Carley.

A drug that treats the cause of sleep apnea could one day give patients more options to manage their condition. “The CPAP device targets the physical problem but not the cause,” says co-lead author Phyllis Zee, MD, in a release. “The drug targets the brain and nerves that regulate the upper airway muscles. It alters the neurotransmitters from the brain that communicate with the muscles. Better understanding of this will help us develop more effective and personalized treatments for sleep apnea.”

New cannabis therapies for sleep apnea are already on the horizon. Nasal respiratory and sleep technology company Rhinomed recently announced that it is partnering with the medical cannabis company Columbia Care to develop a product that can be administered through the nose with a nasal stent during sleep. The investigational cannabis product would treat several qualifying conditions, including obstructive sleep apnea.

“It is administered almost like a dermal patch, but inside the nose. What we can do is we can deliver a very set amount over a set period of time,” says Michael Johnson, CEO of Rhinomed. “And because it is going directly into the blood, into your circulatory system, we can actually use a much lower amount to achieve a clinical outcome than if you were to swallow it.”

This could offer an alternative to CPAP therapy. “That’s really interesting to us because certainly compliance rates with CPAP are under 40%. It’s an expensive therapy, patients don’t really like it, and yet there’s been no innovation in the sector for a long time,” says Johnson. “Here is an opportunity, potentially, to create a whole new mode of therapy that actually doesn’t treat the symptom of sleep apnea, but actually goes to ask the question: What is the underlying cause, what is the underlying reason why people have apnea?”

References

1. Ramar K, Rosen IM, Kirsch DB, et al. Medical Cannabis and the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An American Academy of Sleep Medicine Position Statement. J Clin Sleep Med. 2018 Apr 15;14(4):679-81.

2. Minnesota Department of Health. Issue Brief on Obstructive Sleep Apnea. 2017 Sept. Available at www.health.state.mn.us/topics/cannabis/rulemaking/sleepapneabrief.pdf.

3. Carley DW, Prasad B, Reid KJ, et al. Pharmacotherapy of apnea by cannabimimetic enhancement, the PACE clinical trial: effects of dronabinol in obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep. 2018 Jan 1;41(1).

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JADEO Sleep 2 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


Why Lack Of Sleep Is Bad For Your Health

Many effects of a lack of sleep, such as feeling grumpy and not working at your best, are well known. But did you know that sleep deprivation can also have profound consequences on your physical health?

One in 3 of us suffers from poor sleep, with stress, computers and taking work home often blamed.

However, the cost of all those sleepless nights is more than just bad moods and a lack of focus.

Regular poor sleep puts you at risk of serious medical conditions, including obesity, heart disease and diabetes – and it shortens your life expectancy.

It's now clear that a solid night's sleep is essential for a long and healthy life.

How much sleep do we need?

Most of us need around 8 hours of good-quality sleep a night to function properly – but some need more and some less. What matters is that you find out how much sleep you need and then try to achieve it.

As a general rule, if you wake up tired and spend the day longing for a chance to have a nap, it's likely that you're not getting enough sleep.

A variety of factors can cause poor sleep, including health conditions such as sleep apnoea. But in most cases, it's due to bad sleeping habits.

What happens if I don't sleep?

Everyone's experienced the fatigue, short temper and lack of focus that often follow a poor night's sleep.

An occasional night without sleep makes you feel tired and irritable the next day, but it won't harm your health.

After several sleepless nights, the mental effects become more serious. Your brain will fog, making it difficult to concentrate and make decisions. You'll start to feel down, and may fall asleep during the day. Your risk of injury and accidents at home, work and on the road also increases.

If it continues, lack of sleep can affect your overall health and make you prone to serious medical conditions, such as obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes.

Here are 7 ways in which a good night's sleep can boost your health:

1. Sleep boosts immunity

If you seem to catch every cold and flu that's going around, your bedtime could be to blame. Prolonged lack of sleep can disrupt your immune system, so you're less able to fend off bugs.

2. Sleep can slim you

Sleeping less may mean you put on weight! Studies have shown that people who sleep less than 7 hours a day tend to gain more weight and have a higher risk of becoming obese than those who get 7 hours of slumber.

It's believed to be because sleep-deprived people have reduced levels of leptin (the chemical that makes you feel full) and increased levels of ghrelin (the hunger-stimulating hormone).

3. Sleep boosts mental wellbeing

Given that a single sleepless night can make you irritable and moody the following day, it's not surprising that chronic sleep debt may lead to long-term mood disorders like depression and anxiety.

When people with anxiety or depression were surveyed to calculate their sleeping habits, it turned out that most of them slept for less than 6 hours a night.

4. Sleep prevents diabetes

Studies have suggested that people who usually sleep less than 5 hours a night have an increased risk of developing diabetes.

It seems that missing out on deep sleep may lead to type 2 diabetes by changing the way the body processes glucose, which the body uses for energy.

5. Sleep increases sex drive

Men and women who don't get enough quality sleep have lower libidos and less of an interest in sex, research suggests.

Men who suffer from sleep apnoea – a disorder in which breathing difficulties lead to interrupted sleep – also tend to have lower testosterone levels, which can lower libido.

6. Sleep wards off heart disease

Long-standing sleep deprivation seems to be associated with increased heart rate, an increase in blood pressure and higher levels of certain chemicals linked with inflammation, which may put extra strain on your heart.

7. Sleep increases fertility

Difficulty conceiving a baby has been claimed as one of the effects of sleep deprivation, in both men and women. Apparently, regular sleep disruptions can cause trouble conceiving by reducing the secretion of reproductive hormones.

How to catch up on lost sleep

If you don't get enough sleep, there's only one way to compensate – getting more sleep.

It won't happen with a single early night. If you've had months of restricted sleep, you'll have built up a significant sleep debt, so expect recovery to take several weeks.

Starting on a weekend, try to add on an extra hour or 2 of sleep a night. The way to do this is to go to bed when you're tired, and allow your body to wake you in the morning (no alarm clocks allowed!).

Expect to sleep for upwards of 10 hours a night at first. After a while, the amount of time you sleep will gradually decrease to a normal level.

Don't rely on caffeine or energy drinks as a short-term pick-me-up. They may boost your energy and concentration temporarily, but can disrupt your sleep patterns even further in the long term.

Source: National Health Service UK

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JADEO Sleep 2 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


Can CBD Help You Sleep Better? How CBD Treats Insomnia (VIDEO)

We love the way Thomas DeLauer discusses CBD and sleep, and breaks down how CBD treats sleep disorders like insomnia.

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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

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  • From 22

    Good info...

JADEO Sleep 2 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


11 Tips For Healthy Sleep

Healthy sleep habits can make a big difference in your quality of life. Having healthy sleep habits is often referred to as having good sleep hygiene. In an effort to achieve good sleep hygiene and get a good nights rest, try to maintain following sleep practices on a consistent basis:

1. Stick to a sleep schedule of the same bedtime and wake up time, even on the weekends.

This helps to regulate your body's clock and could help you fall asleep and stay asleep for the night.

2. Practice a relaxing bedtime ritual.

A relaxing, routine activity right before bedtime conducted away from bright lights helps separate your sleep time from activities that can cause excitement, stress or anxiety which can make it more difficult to fall asleep, get sound and deep sleep or remain asleep.

3. If you have trouble sleeping, avoid naps, especially in the afternoon.

Power napping may help you get through the day, but if you find that you can't fall asleep at bedtime, eliminating even short catnaps may help.

4. Exercise daily.

Vigorous exercise is best, but even light exercise is better than no activity. Exercise at any time of day, but not at the expense of your sleep.

5. Evaluate your room.

Design your sleep environment to establish the conditions you need for sleep. Your bedroom should be cool –between 60 and 67 degrees. Your bedroom should also be free from any noise that can disturb your sleep. Finally, your bedroom should be free from any light. Check your room for noises or other distractions. This includes a bed partner's sleep disruptions such as snoring. Consider using blackout curtains, eye shades, ear plugs, "white noise" machines, humidifiers, fans and other devices.

6. Sleep on a comfortable mattress and pillows.

Make sure your mattress is comfortable and supportive. The one you have been using for years may have exceeded its life expectancy – about 9 or 10 years for most good quality mattresses. Have comfortable pillows and make the room attractive and inviting for sleep but also free of allergens that might affect you and objects that might cause you to slip or fall if you have to get up

7. Use bright light to help manage your circadian rhythms.

Avoid bright light in the evening and expose yourself to sunlight in the morning. This will keep your circadian rhythms in check.

8. Avoid alcohol, cigarettes, and heavy meals in the evening.

Alcohol, cigarettes and caffeine can disrupt sleep. Eating big or spicy meals can cause discomfort from indigestion that can make it hard to sleep. If you can, avoid eating large meals for two to three hours before bedtime. Try a light snack 45 minutes before bed if you’re still hungry.

9. Wind down.

Your body needs time to shift into sleep mode, so spend the last hour before bed doing a calming activity such as reading. For some people, using an electronic device such as a laptop can make it hard to fall asleep, because the particular type of light emanating from the screens of these devices is activating to the brain. If you have trouble sleeping, avoid electronics before bed or in the middle of the night.

10. If you can't sleep, go into another room and do something relaxing until you feel tired.

It is best to take work materials, computers and televisions out of the sleeping environment. Use your bed only for sleep and sex to strengthen the association between bed and sleep. If you associate a particular activity or item with anxiety about sleeping, omit it from your bedtime routine.

11. If you’re still having trouble sleeping

Don’t hesitate to speak with your doctor or to find a sleep professional. You may also benefit from recording your sleep in a Sleep Diary to help you better evaluate common patterns or issues you may see with your sleep or sleeping habits.

Source: The National Sleep Foundation

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  • From Burge

    Wow, this is great. I need to follow some of these...

    • From Janelle Simone

      Agreed!

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JADEO Sleep 3 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


The Science Of Smell In A Good Night’s Sleep

Sleep hygiene is a concept that is getting more attention in recent years, something that can play a key role for insomnia sufferers in getting a good night’s sleep. As we all know, getting a good night’s sleep is key to being able to focus during the day, so we wanted to do a deeper dive into the nuances of herbal medicine to support JADEO readers on their quest for deep, therapeutic rest!

Sleep experts typically recommend creating a soothing sleep environment devoid of electronic distractions, avoiding caffeine and other stimulants in the hours before bed, and establishing a nighttime routine. These habits can all help you achieve that sought after well-rested feeling in the morning.

Our recent deep dive into cannabinoids for sleep illuminated the role of CBN, a little-known cannabinoid with medically identified sedative effects. Because a good night’s rest is so important for overall health and healing, we wanted to explore further and look at what other herbal therapies go hand in hand with cannabis for sleep?

Best Terpenes For A Calming, Sedating Effect


The tweet from Green Relief is true! Scientists are working to demystify the effects of terpenes on properties of cannabis, and as they uncover more of the connection between the scent profiles and powers of the plant, we can use their findings to select the best weed strains for sleep.

First, you may be wondering - what are terpenes?

Terpenes can be defined as “any of a large group of volatile unsaturated hydrocarbons found in the essential oils of plants, especially conifers and citrus trees” and can be found in the same glands that produce THC and CBD.

Female cannabis plants, especially, produce trichomes (the small fuzzy and crystal-like) hairs found on buds, which produce THC, CBD, flavonoids, and terpenes.

Terpenes, not only give your smoke its aroma and colour, but terpenes are also known to have a variety of medicinal attributes that are anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory and can benefit people suffering from the likes of asthma, depression, chronic pain, and much more.

While we are discovering that a range of terpenes are good for anxiety or nervousness, one particular terpene, called myrcene, is known to have a sedating effect which is helpful to induce sleep. Also found in mangos, lemongrass and thyme - it’s benefits include pain reduction, relief from inflammation and antioxidant properties.

Best Essential Oils For Sleep + Relaxation

As mentioned, the terpenes in cannabis are found in the essential oils of many other plants. Many of these plants have had traditional medicinal uses for hundreds of years. Some of these traditional medicinal uses include calming or sleep-inducing effects. Some of the popular favourites are found in lavender, chamomile, ylang-ylang, neroli, and cedarwood.

Best Herbal Teas or Tinctures For Sleep

Not surprisingly using many of the same herbs in teas and tinctures can also help lull you to sleep. In addition to common herbs lavender and chamomile, we suggest strong herbs that may not have as pleasing aromatic profiles, such as passionflower, valerian or hops to help knock you out. Both infusing herbs as a tea or taking them orally as a potent extraction (tincture) are wonderful ways to use the power of natural medicine to guide the body to a restful state. Combining the powers of herbal medicine with optimal sleep hygiene practices should send you well on your way to restful zzzs.


Remember to always consult a medical professional before starting any new health care regimen.

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  • From 22

    Absolutely

JADEO Sleep 4 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


Cannabis And Sleep: Is CDB And/Or THC The Answer To Your Sleep Woes?

It’s an issue that affects us all; quality and duration of sleep. Whether you’re a busy 9-5er, a relaxed retiree or anywhere in between, it can be hard to get your recommended seven hours a day. While humans have been using puffs of Indica's to help lull into a bedtime slumber for thousands of years, new medical research is beginning to back that adding cannabis as a sleep aid has the potential to help with any short-term sleep troubles.

While we know certain strains of cannabis can be used as a sedative and sleep agent, the jury is still out on what formulation uniquely treats difficulty sleeping. THC and CBD have alternating effects on sleep depending on dosage. Anecdotal and research evidence hasn’t given us great guidelines on exact measured milligram levels, although a 1:1 mixture of both has been shown to have maximum sleep benefit in people suffering from chronic pain, according to a 2017 review on the role of cannabinoids in sleep disorders.

Less Isn't Always More

Based on the research that has been done so far, there is counter-intuitive information that shows you can be fooled by common assumptions around cannabis and sleep. For example, high dose CBD has been shown to help with sleep, but low dose CBD has been shown to have stimulant effects. Studies in both humans and mice which administered lower doses of CBD demonstrated increased wakefulness. Another study of medical cannabis users found that users treating insomnia were more likely to use high dose CBD strains. More research needs to be done on exact dosing, but these insights can bring medical cannabis consumers the insight needed to use CBD effectively for a good night's sleep.

Know Your Cannabinoids

Researcher Dr. Evan Russo identified sedative effects in the cannabinoid known as cannabinol (CBN), which is found in smokable flower in increasing concentrations over time through the oxidation of THC. She argues that the sativa and indica designations are useless, and recommends focusing on cannabinoid content instead - promoting the quest for higher levels of CBN in a strain designated for sleep.

Watch Your Tolerance

Sleep latency is a key benefit of cannabis for sleep, meaning it can help you fall asleep more quickly, and stay asleep longer. Short-term cannabis use can help you fall asleep faster, but for some people, that’s not always the case. Some early studies point to the development of tolerance to the sedative effects in some people who report long-term cannabis usage.

Practice Makes Perfect?

Different modes of ingestion yield different effects, so consider trying an oil and a flower vape while you test out what works best for you. We know that in general, ingesting cannabis orally has a prolonged, body-high effect that is uneven in onset, while inhaling cannabis has a more immediate and pronounced impact on your body. Personalized treatment for sleep, as with any condition, is the best way to achieve optimal results.

So, does cannabis improve or cure sleep deficiencies? The verdict is still officially out on that as more research needs to be done. However, current research does prove it can provide some relief to a number of individuals.

Remember to always consult a medical professional before starting any new health care regimen.

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Stay Informed. Stay Healthy

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  • From Romes_416

    It helps me sleep for sure!

JADEO Sleep 3 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


[VIDEO] Can Medical Cannabis be effective for sleep apnea, insomnia and other sleep disturbances?

Is Your Lack of Sleep Impacting Your Daily Performance?

You might have heard of medical cannabis and its association to sleep, but we want you to hear real data and research from a doctor with experience. In this video with Dr. Rachna Patel, who is based out of California, she reads a personal letter from Bill regarding his sleep disturbances and discusses her findings with patients she's treated with medical cannabis. What did she find? Watch below to learn.

The Video above is owned by Dr. Rachna Patel.

If you liked this, you should check out JADEO's article on Is Cannabis A Quality Sleep Aid?


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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

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#WeAreJadeo

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JADEO Sleep 6 months ago / Toronto, Ontario


Is Cannabis A Quality Sleep Aid?

Many people are not comfortable taking traditional, pharmaceutical "sleeping pills" that you would get from your pharmacy. If you're opting to skip your Lunesta, Sonata, Ambien, or Halcion, there are a variety of other options for sleep aids that include herbal and natural remedies such as melatonin.

However, some researchers and medical experts have begun to consider whether cannabis could possibly be used as a natural form of a plant-derived sleep aid? Cannabis is known to help with many other medical needs such as seizures and pain management, so people want to know if it might help them sleep better at night as well.  

Does Cannabis Help Solve Sleep Issues?

According to Psychology Today, many people have long used cannabis-derived products to help them with conditions such as insomnia, poor sleep, or even to get a better quality of sleep than they previously were getting.

Canada has legalized Cannabis for medicinal and recreational purposes, and many U.S. states have legalized or are in the process of legalizing Cannabis. So, as medical cannabis becomes acceptable in our society, the real question is continuing to be pressed: Does cannabis actually help improve sleep?

Cannabis may help solve some sleep issues for some people considering that cannabis is known to be able to help people relax and be in a calm (sometimes euphoric) state. This calm and relaxed feeling can help return a person to a calmer state which may help increase their quality of sleep.

Focus On CBD Not THC:

The key to finding a cannabis product that may assist someone as a sleep aid is to help is finding a strain that is higher in CBD and lower in THC.

Why?

CBD is the relaxing chemical in the cannabis product that will allow people to chill out and feel calmer and more relaxed.

THC however is a chemical that will give someone that infamous "buzz" that is known to come with smoking cannabis. 

Some CBD-heavy strains may be helpful to people who are looking for a relaxant to help them fall asleep or to treat conditions such as insomnia.

On the other hand, THC-heavy strains of cannabis that cause "buzzes" and "euphoria" are less likely to be helpful to someone as a sleep aid. Many people will find that they are not able to relax and sleep when they are buzzed as they can when they are relaxed and made calmer so they can restore their body's natural state of rest to help them fall asleep.

Certain Strains Help More Than Others:

There are certain strains of cannabis as discussed above that will help more with aiding sleep than others. One strain that has often been used to help people sleep since a 2006 study proved it somewhat effective for many people is the Indica strain.

On the other hand, it is recommended that people avoid strains such as the Sativa strains as they are known for inducing more of a buzz and may make many people feel more hyper and energized feeling rather than relaxed and sedated.

Dr. Kymron deCesare of Steep Hill Labs also cites that many people have more success with using aged cannabis as a sleep aid. The reason for this is that over time the THC in the cannabis wears off and reduces the "buzz" someone gets from taking the cannabis.

What Is The Future Of Cannabis As A Sleep Aid?

While many people have said that CBD-heavy strains of cannabis have aided them as a sleep aid, the studies are still not out to prove that this is true for everyone. Moreover, until more universities are permitted by the National Institute of Drug Abuse to grow marijuana for research purposes (the University of Mississippi is the only one currently allowed to do so) the progress in studying cannabis for uses such as sleep aids will be slow going.

Moreover, many experts fear that using cannabis as a sleep aid for a long period of time might result in some level of "dependency" on the substance to help them sleep. This is similar to the effect people who consistently drink alcohol experience and in the future it may take more and more cannabis to have the same effect as a smaller dose did before.

Conclusions:

In the end, there needs to be a lot more studies done on medical marijuana to determine if it's a long-term solution for a sleep aid. While research is slow-going (hopefully this will change with legalization), early research shows that CBD-heavy strains of cannabis may be more helpful for some people than others, but the promise exists to think that one day cannabis may be a solution to sleep problems (especially temporary issues).

Remember to always consult your doctor before beginning any type of wellness treatment.

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Stay informed. Stay healthy. 

#WeAreJadeo


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