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Whether it's for you or a loved one, this group is for those that are looking at cannabis as a medicine. Discuss topics from cancer to diabetes and epilepsy to parkinson's disease and share your experiences to help others dealing with conditions that may affect quality of life.

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JADEO Medical Cannabis 2 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} Can Cannabis Be As Addictive As Opioids?

Curious about whether cannabis is as addictive as opioids? Watch now as Dr. Peter Blecher, Chief Medical Officer, Starseed Medicinal Inc. provides the answer.

-

The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

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Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo

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JADEO Medical Cannabis 2 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


Medical Cannabis In The Workplace

Canada has certainly come a long way since cannabis prohibition back in the 1920s. However, it wasn’t until recently, some 80 years after prohibition, that Health Canada allowed access to cannabis for medical purposes. Even now in 2019 with legalization, there is still an information gap and negative stigma around cannabis, and as long as it exists it could prevent millions of Canadians from properly treating their chronic pain and ailments.

Medical cannabis use in Canada is indeed rising, which is why it is important to discuss cannabis in the workplace now more than ever. Registered medical cannabis patients in Canada increased from 23,930 in 2015 to over 330,000 in 2018, a 14-times increase in just three years. Health Canada projects that number will increase to 450,000 by 2024.

With the rise of medical cannabis users and the aforementioned information gap in mind, let’s begin by clearing the air around medical cannabis with some facts.

“Medical cannabis patients are not looking to get high. They are looking to get well” - Starseed Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Peter M. Blecher.

Perhaps the most important factor skeptics need to understand is that medical cannabis can play a key role in the treatment of chronic pain. This is especially true when considering the “Chronic Pain Triad”, three interrelated pillars— pain intensity, mental health and wellness, and sleep quality. These three elements make up the basis for most chronic pain. Each of these three elements may contribute to any other two, either in an aggravating or alleviating manner. Traditional management for any of these contributing factors often involves multiple drugs daily, but medical cannabis is said to present an opportunity for individuals to treat all three elements with a single prescription, simplifying and eliminating a potentially dangerous regime of medications. It seems as though Canadian patients and prescribers rely heavily on opioids as their primary form of treatment, but in a 2017 study called Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, 80% of patients reported that cannabis by itself was more effective than their opioid treatments.

In terms of cannabis in the workplace, a recent study from Sanofi Canada Healthcare found that 64% of employees with workplace health plans agreed that ‘medical cannabis, when authorized by a physician, should be covered by their health benefit plan’. Despite this and evidence that demonstrates the beneficial use of medical cannabis in place of some prescription drugs (i.e. opioids), approximately only 4% of employers offer coverage for medical cannabis according to the HRPA (Human Resources Professionals Association). It is understood that a common factor impeding the increase in coverage for medical cannabis are regulatory roadblocks. For instance, the federal government has yet to include medical cannabis as an approved drug under the Food and Drugs act – as a result, it does not have a Drug Identification Number (DIN). These numbers, which are issued by Health Canada, which are granted by Health Canada,, indicate that a drug has been evaluated and approved by the government. Until a DIN is established, employers will find it difficult to apply traditional drug coverage for medical cannabis under their existing health benefit plans.

Understanding this treatment was vital for many to live a healthier, happier life without the threat of addiction to harsher prescription drugs like opioids, companies like Starseed Medicinal stepped up to revolutionize the medical cannabis industry. Starseed’s end-to-end service model responds to considerations and concerns from plan sponsors and employers to employees, helping them navigating through the largely uncharted and sometimes overwhelming territory of medical cannabis.

According to Starseed, there are three elements to consider when establishing a modern and sustainable drug-related workplace policy: (1) setting better expectations, (2) reducing risk to the employer and employees and (3) providing a clear line of sight to the parameters of accommodation. Employers are required to provide a safe workplace for employees, which means accommodating their medical needs. On the flip side, employers are concerned that cannabis use at work can lead to impairment and increased risk of injuries or incidents. In response to this, Starseed supports zero tolerance applied appropriately. When discussing zero tolerance, it’s important to make the distinction between zero tolerance of impairment, and zero tolerance of all narcotics, even those that do not cause impairment. Understanding the difference will require further cannabis education for those penning these policies. Something that Starseed has also worked into their model.

As Canada’s acceptance and normalization of cannabis continues to grow and adapt, workplaces will have to grow and adapt as well or fear being left behind as its citizens increasingly work with companies that are arming themselves with policies for not only today but tomorrow and beyond. Those blazing the trail, licensed producers like Starseed and the various partners with whom they stand shoulder-to-shoulder, are the ones working to create the 21st-century workplace during this global movement.

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Janelle Simone Medical Cannabis 3 weeks ago / Scarborough, Ontario

Very interesting news! https://www.greenentrepreneur.com/article/334002?utm_source=HearstNewspapers&utm_medium=related&utm_campaign=syndication

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Study Finds Marijuana Users Have Better Chance of Surviving Heart Attack

GreenEntrepreneur

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. A new study involving millions of medical records and analysis of patient outcomes has found that those who use marijuana have a better chance of surviving after being hospitalized with a heart attack.

https://www.greenentrepreneur.com/article/334002

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JADEO Medical Cannabis 3 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} What Are The Differences Between Dried Cannabis Flower And Oil?

Dried Cannabis Flower versus Cannabis Oil, wondering what the difference is and how they're used? Watch now as Dr. Peter Blecher, Chief Medical Officer, Starseed Medicinal Inc. explains.


-

The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

-



Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo

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Mike Robinson Medical Cannabis 3 weeks ago / Santa Barbara, Alberta


How Cannabis Treats My PTSD

Every Memorial Day weekend the same series of events, mostly during sleep, occur that surround the life altering wreck on the racetrack back in 1995. PTSD is the acronym of the weekend to beat ~ I got this. I’m plagued with nightmares that lead up to this date, last night I qualified for the big Sunday race in my dreams as it wasn’t a nightmare.. not yet. Normally that’s reserved for tonight. This year? I’m writing about it instead of holding it in. That's one of the biggest problems for those of us that fight this - internalization of our feelings as for the most part the outside world can't see this problem by looking at us and often will dismiss it as something that we should have 'already gotten over' - likely the worse words to use towards or about someone with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. We don't need to 'get over it', we need to work through it which is why I'm typing right now when I'd rather not be. Let's face it - going through trauma is not rare. About 6 of every 10 men (or 60%) and 5 of every 10 women (or 50%) experience at least one trauma in their lives. Women are more likely to experience sexual assault and child sexual abuse. Men are more likely to experience accidents, physical assault, combat, disaster, or to witness death or injury.

PTSD can happen to anyone and it's important to understand it's not a sign of weakness, those I know that are survivors and fight this show me their strength. There's a number of factors can increase the chance that someone will develop this and almost all are not under that person's control. For example, if you were directly exposed to the trauma or injured, you are more likely to develop PTSD - maybe you could have avoided the situation or event that caused this, but it's likely something we never planned on happening. In my case there was a known risk. But, How do we live with this? How do we get others to be aware of what we're going through - especially during 'trigger moments' - or like this weekend for me - trigger days. For others it could be the anniversary of just about anything or the reminder of it. For me since I've worked through my problems on my own for the most part - it's the Cannabis Plant that changes my life and allows me to get by. Before I started ingesting oils and extracts from the plant I would often end up hospitalized over Memorial Day weekend as the combination of PTSD and Epilepsy generally means the patient is going to seize. Without cannabis ingested and inhaled, today would be much harder than it is. The plant allows me to refocus, relax, and move out of the anxiety that can literally paralyze a person with memories of the past trauma flooding their mind. Cannabis extracts cause this racing mind to put on the brakes - and literally stop the wreck from mentally recurring in my sleep or even waking hours.

No alt text provided for this image

Today I can make two choices - one would be to continue down the path I go every year on Memorial Day weekend, the other is to stop and consider the fact I'm alive, I can walk again, talk again, see again, I'm free of the pharmaceutical opioids that were started heavily after the wreck, I have my life back. Figuring out what to do with it and how to live it can be a challenge while fighting anxiety, depression, and other effects of PTSD. I believe it's very important for people that are coping with this to have people to talk to. Sometimes It seems like people want to dismiss it, compare it, or to minimize the symptoms, for the patient with this going on that's not good. Today I felt the best way to really talk about this was to write about it. Even if nobody ever read this it's a release that's necessary. I can't count the number of times I've woken in the middle of sleep and realized I'm not on the racetrack - and other times when I've woken in a hospital bed to realize the same thing while I examining my body for injuries from grand mal seizures. As it is PTSD can cause psycho-motor seizures in some cases, but when you add an Epilepsy diagnosis to it - it's like pouring fuel on a fire.

For me it's THC and it's brother or sister CBN that do the most for me, but I won't discount CBD as long as I don't take very high of a dose. Everyone is different and with me I find that CBD alone will make me edgy vs. calm - especially if it's made with Isolate. But when I have the right combination of THC with a tad of CBD and along with CBN I get a very calm feeling that allows my mind to slow down and relax. As it is I already think quickly, speak likely too fast, and type too much - so this combo is an awesome one on any given day. Perfect for replacing opioids, stopping seizures, controlling PTSD, and keeping cancer in remission while also fighting chronic pain. The list is so long of what my own continually changing cannabinoid medicine protocol does for me, the reason it has to be a fluctuating protocol is due to the number of issues being addressed.

No alt text provided for this image

For example, this weekend I'll be dosing very high with THC during the day. 10:1 and 20:1 (Whole plant Cannabis) THC:CBD with CBN used separately in the afternoon and evenings to build up the ability to sleep through the race that continues in mind mind after the eyes close. Because CBD does have an uplifting effect on me that's what I'm using more in the morning as it allows me to escape depression that comes after a night of racing and wrecking in my sleep and the anxiety of the knowledge it can and does happen. It's all a matter of knowing ourselves, our bodies, and how Cannabinoids/The Plant will work for us. This is a trial and error type of creation when it comes to protocols, the necessity to change a protocol is easy to spot - it's not working right. With doctors and pharmaceuticals we see the limitations they have right away when comparing the plant to pills. It's way harder to 'dial in' a protocol of pharmaceuticals that will work in my opinion for most people with PTSD, so the issue once again is access for all patients.

We can live a better life and make it through times of trouble if we have the right supports. Sometimes that means people willing to listen and help you and it definitely means the right medicinal support. Many will choose western medicine or natural without thinking "I'll use both" and integrating the use of cannabis and extracts into their healthcare. I do this purposely although I'd rather not when it comes to PTSD as I literally don't want to talk about it with a doctor that's given me a short time slot to see them in. I also don't want to talk to a psychiatrist that quickly prescribes pills I don't need or psychologists that will see me so little that it has no benefit. But I do want my medical file documented and have had 2 pharmaceuticals removed over the years of using cannabis that both were prescribed for 'Severe PTSD & Anxiety" with medical records now indicating the use of cannabis and cbd oil instead of them. Sometimes Integrating your cannabis medicine into your other treatments get tricky - but I don't make my goal of it all to be right in debates with doctors, The goal has always been to get the medication list to show cannabis and extract use as the pharmaceutical use diminishes.

We can overcome the symptoms of PTSD - whether it's the use of cannabinoid medicine or another support system - hang in there because life gets better. If you're suffering from this - stay strong and stay bold, be your own hero. Remember that the more you speak out about this the more you are listened to and the better you'll feel inside. For me it doesn't matter if not one person reads this as I wrote this article for my own well being knowing it likely could help others.

Mike Robinson, Medicinal Cannabis Patient, Founder - Global Cannabinoid Research Center. And, most of all, Genevieve's Daddy ~

https://www.mikesmedicines.com/medical-marijuana/the-cannabis-love-story/


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JADEO Medical Cannabis 3 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} Can I Use Medical Cannabis While On Other Medications?

Navigating prescription medications can be tricky. Watch now as Dr. Peter Blecher, Chief Medical Officer, Starseed Medicinal Inc. explains whether cannabis can be used with other medications.

-

The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

-


Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo

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JADEO Medical Cannabis 4 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} Medical Cannabis: Where Do You Start?

The thought of obtaining a medical cannabis prescription may seem daunting, but it's actually not as complicated as you may think. Watch now, as we walk you through the simple process.

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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

-



Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo

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  • From BahaqueenM

    wow, I've thought about medical marijuana before for a condition i experience never really thought the process was this simple. Will def look into this.

JADEO Medical Cannabis 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} How Do I Get A Prescription For Medical Cannabis?

Curious about how to get a medical prescription for cannabis? Watch now as Dr. Peter Blecher, Chief Medical Officer, Starseed Medicinal Inc. explains.

-

The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

-

Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo


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  • From 22

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Burge Medical Cannabis 1 month ago / Vancouver , British Columbia

No one should ever be rejected for their medication. This is something that must be supported by the numbers, with a strong push for change. https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/medicinal-cannabis-user-evicted-from-smoke-free-n-s-apartment-1.4422368

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Medicinal cannabis user evicted from smoke-free N.S. apartment

CTVNews

A Dartmouth, N.S., man with a physical disability is fighting for the right to smoke medicinal pot in a smoke-free apartment, as he takes his battle to the Nova Scotia Supreme Court. Philip Bennett, 57, was evicted from his apartment on Friday after losing several legal challenges at the provincial Residential Tenancies Board and small claims court.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/medicinal-cannabis-user-e...

Related comments

  • From Janelle Simone

    wow, how is this even legal?

  • From 22

    This will get reversed under The Charter challenge. This will be a groundbreaking decision from the Supreme Courts.

JADEO Medical Cannabis 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} At What Point Should I Consider Cannabis As A Pain Treatment?

Is chronic pain affecting your quality of life? At what point should you consider cannabis as a treatment? Watch now as Dr. Peter Blecher, Chief Medical Officer, Starseed Medicinal Inc. explains.

-

The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

-


Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo


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JADEO Medical Cannabis 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} Can Depression Be Linked To Chronic Pain?

Wondering if chronic pain and depression are connected? Watch now as Dr. Peter Blecher, Chief Medical Officer, Starseed Medicinal Inc. explains.

-

The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

-

Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo


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  • From 22

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️✅

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JADEO Medical Cannabis 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} JADEO Asks Montel Williams- Part II

Are you new to cannabis? If so, you need to hear this from Montel Williams!

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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

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Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo

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  • From 22

    Great interview... GREAT job “snagging him”

  • From Brianne Campbell

    YES! Research is key!

  • From BahaqueenM

    Wow...mind blown

  • From 22

    “Research Cannabinoids”

JADEO Medical Cannabis 2 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} Can Cannabis Be As Addictive As Opioids?

Curious about whether cannabis is as addictive as opioids? Watch now as Dr. Peter Blecher, Chief Medical Officer, Starseed Medicinal Inc. provides the answer.

-

The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

-

Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo

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JADEO Medical Cannabis 2 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


Medical Cannabis In The Workplace

Canada has certainly come a long way since cannabis prohibition back in the 1920s. However, it wasn’t until recently, some 80 years after prohibition, that Health Canada allowed access to cannabis for medical purposes. Even now in 2019 with legalization, there is still an information gap and negative stigma around cannabis, and as long as it exists it could prevent millions of Canadians from properly treating their chronic pain and ailments.

Medical cannabis use in Canada is indeed rising, which is why it is important to discuss cannabis in the workplace now more than ever. Registered medical cannabis patients in Canada increased from 23,930 in 2015 to over 330,000 in 2018, a 14-times increase in just three years. Health Canada projects that number will increase to 450,000 by 2024.

With the rise of medical cannabis users and the aforementioned information gap in mind, let’s begin by clearing the air around medical cannabis with some facts.

“Medical cannabis patients are not looking to get high. They are looking to get well” - Starseed Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Peter M. Blecher.

Perhaps the most important factor skeptics need to understand is that medical cannabis can play a key role in the treatment of chronic pain. This is especially true when considering the “Chronic Pain Triad”, three interrelated pillars— pain intensity, mental health and wellness, and sleep quality. These three elements make up the basis for most chronic pain. Each of these three elements may contribute to any other two, either in an aggravating or alleviating manner. Traditional management for any of these contributing factors often involves multiple drugs daily, but medical cannabis is said to present an opportunity for individuals to treat all three elements with a single prescription, simplifying and eliminating a potentially dangerous regime of medications. It seems as though Canadian patients and prescribers rely heavily on opioids as their primary form of treatment, but in a 2017 study called Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, 80% of patients reported that cannabis by itself was more effective than their opioid treatments.

In terms of cannabis in the workplace, a recent study from Sanofi Canada Healthcare found that 64% of employees with workplace health plans agreed that ‘medical cannabis, when authorized by a physician, should be covered by their health benefit plan’. Despite this and evidence that demonstrates the beneficial use of medical cannabis in place of some prescription drugs (i.e. opioids), approximately only 4% of employers offer coverage for medical cannabis according to the HRPA (Human Resources Professionals Association). It is understood that a common factor impeding the increase in coverage for medical cannabis are regulatory roadblocks. For instance, the federal government has yet to include medical cannabis as an approved drug under the Food and Drugs act – as a result, it does not have a Drug Identification Number (DIN). These numbers, which are issued by Health Canada, which are granted by Health Canada,, indicate that a drug has been evaluated and approved by the government. Until a DIN is established, employers will find it difficult to apply traditional drug coverage for medical cannabis under their existing health benefit plans.

Understanding this treatment was vital for many to live a healthier, happier life without the threat of addiction to harsher prescription drugs like opioids, companies like Starseed Medicinal stepped up to revolutionize the medical cannabis industry. Starseed’s end-to-end service model responds to considerations and concerns from plan sponsors and employers to employees, helping them navigating through the largely uncharted and sometimes overwhelming territory of medical cannabis.

According to Starseed, there are three elements to consider when establishing a modern and sustainable drug-related workplace policy: (1) setting better expectations, (2) reducing risk to the employer and employees and (3) providing a clear line of sight to the parameters of accommodation. Employers are required to provide a safe workplace for employees, which means accommodating their medical needs. On the flip side, employers are concerned that cannabis use at work can lead to impairment and increased risk of injuries or incidents. In response to this, Starseed supports zero tolerance applied appropriately. When discussing zero tolerance, it’s important to make the distinction between zero tolerance of impairment, and zero tolerance of all narcotics, even those that do not cause impairment. Understanding the difference will require further cannabis education for those penning these policies. Something that Starseed has also worked into their model.

As Canada’s acceptance and normalization of cannabis continues to grow and adapt, workplaces will have to grow and adapt as well or fear being left behind as its citizens increasingly work with companies that are arming themselves with policies for not only today but tomorrow and beyond. Those blazing the trail, licensed producers like Starseed and the various partners with whom they stand shoulder-to-shoulder, are the ones working to create the 21st-century workplace during this global movement.

Related comments

JADEO Medical Cannabis 3 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} What Are The Differences Between Dried Cannabis Flower And Oil?

Dried Cannabis Flower versus Cannabis Oil, wondering what the difference is and how they're used? Watch now as Dr. Peter Blecher, Chief Medical Officer, Starseed Medicinal Inc. explains.


-

The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

-



Stay informed. Stay connected.
#WeAreJadeo

Related comments

Mike Robinson Medical Cannabis 3 weeks ago / Santa Barbara, Alberta


How Cannabis Treats My PTSD

Every Memorial Day weekend the same series of events, mostly during sleep, occur that surround the life altering wreck on the racetrack back in 1995. PTSD is the acronym of the weekend to beat ~ I got this. I’m plagued with nightmares that lead up to this date, last night I qualified for the big Sunday race in my dreams as it wasn’t a nightmare.. not yet. Normally that’s reserved for tonight. This year? I’m writing about it instead of holding it in. That's one of the biggest problems for those of us that fight this - internalization of our feelings as for the most part the outside world can't see this problem by looking at us and often will dismiss it as something that we should have 'already gotten over' - likely the worse words to use towards or about someone with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. We don't need to 'get over it', we need to work through it which is why I'm typing right now when I'd rather not be. Let's face it - going through trauma is not rare. About 6 of every 10 men (or 60%) and 5 of every 10 women (or 50%) experience at least one trauma in their lives. Women are more likely to experience sexual assault and child sexual abuse. Men are more likely to experience accidents, physical assault, combat, disaster, or to witness death or injury.

PTSD can happen to anyone and it's important to understand it's not a sign of weakness, those I know that are survivors and fight this show me their strength. There's a number of factors can increase the chance that someone will develop this and almost all are not under that person's control. For example, if you were directly exposed to the trauma or injured, you are more likely to develop PTSD - maybe you could have avoided the situation or event that caused this, but it's likely something we never planned on happening. In my case there was a known risk. But, How do we live with this? How do we get others to be aware of what we're going through - especially during 'trigger moments' - or like this weekend for me - trigger days. For others it could be the anniversary of just about anything or the reminder of it. For me since I've worked through my problems on my own for the most part - it's the Cannabis Plant that changes my life and allows me to get by. Before I started ingesting oils and extracts from the plant I would often end up hospitalized over Memorial Day weekend as the combination of PTSD and Epilepsy generally means the patient is going to seize. Without cannabis ingested and inhaled, today would be much harder than it is. The plant allows me to refocus, relax, and move out of the anxiety that can literally paralyze a person with memories of the past trauma flooding their mind. Cannabis extracts cause this racing mind to put on the brakes - and literally stop the wreck from mentally recurring in my sleep or even waking hours.

No alt text provided for this image

Today I can make two choices - one would be to continue down the path I go every year on Memorial Day weekend, the other is to stop and consider the fact I'm alive, I can walk again, talk again, see again, I'm free of the pharmaceutical opioids that were started heavily after the wreck, I have my life back. Figuring out what to do with it and how to live it can be a challenge while fighting anxiety, depression, and other effects of PTSD. I believe it's very important for people that are coping with this to have people to talk to. Sometimes It seems like people want to dismiss it, compare it, or to minimize the symptoms, for the patient with this going on that's not good. Today I felt the best way to really talk about this was to write about it. Even if nobody ever read this it's a release that's necessary. I can't count the number of times I've woken in the middle of sleep and realized I'm not on the racetrack - and other times when I've woken in a hospital bed to realize the same thing while I examining my body for injuries from grand mal seizures. As it is PTSD can cause psycho-motor seizures in some cases, but when you add an Epilepsy diagnosis to it - it's like pouring fuel on a fire.

For me it's THC and it's brother or sister CBN that do the most for me, but I won't discount CBD as long as I don't take very high of a dose. Everyone is different and with me I find that CBD alone will make me edgy vs. calm - especially if it's made with Isolate. But when I have the right combination of THC with a tad of CBD and along with CBN I get a very calm feeling that allows my mind to slow down and relax. As it is I already think quickly, speak likely too fast, and type too much - so this combo is an awesome one on any given day. Perfect for replacing opioids, stopping seizures, controlling PTSD, and keeping cancer in remission while also fighting chronic pain. The list is so long of what my own continually changing cannabinoid medicine protocol does for me, the reason it has to be a fluctuating protocol is due to the number of issues being addressed.

No alt text provided for this image

For example, this weekend I'll be dosing very high with THC during the day. 10:1 and 20:1 (Whole plant Cannabis) THC:CBD with CBN used separately in the afternoon and evenings to build up the ability to sleep through the race that continues in mind mind after the eyes close. Because CBD does have an uplifting effect on me that's what I'm using more in the morning as it allows me to escape depression that comes after a night of racing and wrecking in my sleep and the anxiety of the knowledge it can and does happen. It's all a matter of knowing ourselves, our bodies, and how Cannabinoids/The Plant will work for us. This is a trial and error type of creation when it comes to protocols, the necessity to change a protocol is easy to spot - it's not working right. With doctors and pharmaceuticals we see the limitations they have right away when comparing the plant to pills. It's way harder to 'dial in' a protocol of pharmaceuticals that will work in my opinion for most people with PTSD, so the issue once again is access for all patients.

We can live a better life and make it through times of trouble if we have the right supports. Sometimes that means people willing to listen and help you and it definitely means the right medicinal support. Many will choose western medicine or natural without thinking "I'll use both" and integrating the use of cannabis and extracts into their healthcare. I do this purposely although I'd rather not when it comes to PTSD as I literally don't want to talk about it with a doctor that's given me a short time slot to see them in. I also don't want to talk to a psychiatrist that quickly prescribes pills I don't need or psychologists that will see me so little that it has no benefit. But I do want my medical file documented and have had 2 pharmaceuticals removed over the years of using cannabis that both were prescribed for 'Severe PTSD & Anxiety" with medical records now indicating the use of cannabis and cbd oil instead of them. Sometimes Integrating your cannabis medicine into your other treatments get tricky - but I don't make my goal of it all to be right in debates with doctors, The goal has always been to get the medication list to show cannabis and extract use as the pharmaceutical use diminishes.

We can overcome the symptoms of PTSD - whether it's the use of cannabinoid medicine or another support system - hang in there because life gets better. If you're suffering from this - stay strong and stay bold, be your own hero. Remember that the more you speak out about this the more you are listened to and the better you'll feel inside. For me it doesn't matter if not one person reads this as I wrote this article for my own well being knowing it likely could help others.

Mike Robinson, Medicinal Cannabis Patient, Founder - Global Cannabinoid Research Center. And, most of all, Genevieve's Daddy ~

https://www.mikesmedicines.com/medical-marijuana/the-cannabis-love-story/


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JADEO Medical Cannabis 3 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} Can I Use Medical Cannabis While On Other Medications?

Navigating prescription medications can be tricky. Watch now as Dr. Peter Blecher, Chief Medical Officer, Starseed Medicinal Inc. explains whether cannabis can be used with other medications.

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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

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JADEO Medical Cannabis 4 weeks ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} Medical Cannabis: Where Do You Start?

The thought of obtaining a medical cannabis prescription may seem daunting, but it's actually not as complicated as you may think. Watch now, as we walk you through the simple process.

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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

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  • From BahaqueenM

    wow, I've thought about medical marijuana before for a condition i experience never really thought the process was this simple. Will def look into this.

JADEO Medical Cannabis 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} How Do I Get A Prescription For Medical Cannabis?

Curious about how to get a medical prescription for cannabis? Watch now as Dr. Peter Blecher, Chief Medical Officer, Starseed Medicinal Inc. explains.

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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

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  • From 22

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

JADEO Medical Cannabis 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} At What Point Should I Consider Cannabis As A Pain Treatment?

Is chronic pain affecting your quality of life? At what point should you consider cannabis as a treatment? Watch now as Dr. Peter Blecher, Chief Medical Officer, Starseed Medicinal Inc. explains.

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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

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JADEO Medical Cannabis 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} Can Depression Be Linked To Chronic Pain?

Wondering if chronic pain and depression are connected? Watch now as Dr. Peter Blecher, Chief Medical Officer, Starseed Medicinal Inc. explains.

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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

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  • From 22

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️✅

JADEO Medical Cannabis 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} JADEO Asks Montel Williams- Part II

Are you new to cannabis? If so, you need to hear this from Montel Williams!

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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

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  • From 22

    Great interview... GREAT job “snagging him”

  • From Brianne Campbell

    YES! Research is key!

  • From BahaqueenM

    Wow...mind blown

  • From 22

    “Research Cannabinoids”

JADEO Medical Cannabis 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


{VIDEO} JADEO Asks Montel Williams

In our exclusive sit-down with Montel Williams, the JADEO team asks the question on everyone's mind at Toronto's O'Cannabiz.


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The views and opinions expressed in this video are of the presenter and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of JADEO.

JADEO makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability or suitability with respect to any content contained within the video.

JADEO urges you to consult with a qualified physician for consultation, diagnosis and/or treatment plans with respect to your medical condition(s) and/or wellness goals.

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  • From 22

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

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JADEO Medical Cannabis 1 month ago / Toronto, Ontario


Transdermal Technologies: Cannabis Patches In Focus

The skin, or epidermis, is the largest organ on our body, with a porous membrane that allows chemicals to pass through the external layer and become absorbed into the bloodstream. As cannabinoid therapies have become more widely adopted, companies are trying to create new methods of delivery to suit every preference and intended application. As we wait on the regulatory framework to loosen up on topicals in Canada, we look to our friends south of the border to see what kind of transdermal technologies have been developed in the United States.

To begin with, what are they? A transdermal patch is a medicated adhesive patch that is placed on the skin to deliver a specific dose of medication via the skin and into the bloodstream. As an example, we’re all familiar with nicotine patches as a way to combat symptoms associated with withdrawal from smoking tobacco products. This direct contact on the skin allows chemicals to pass through the epidermis and into the bloodstream without getting digested, meaning they can offer stronger and more localized relief.

When we look at this application for cannabinoid therapies we see how terpenes and cannabinoids are easily absorbed transdermally, making this another area to explore for cannabis companies. With today’s robust U.S. market it can be a dizzying array of choices and not all patches are created for the same application. When you’re breaking down the key things to consider in transdermal dosing and application, you want to consider the rate of absorption, which will account for the percentage of bioavailability. This is key to consider how transdermal ingredients will effectively penetrate the skin through this prolonged release.

When your skin’s heat activates the patch, the cannabinoid begins to spread out into your skin, technically known as “moving down the gradient.” This concept is very much like pouring boiling water into a coffee mug and leaving it sitting on your counter. The water contains a lot of heat, while the atmosphere around it doesn’t. Because of this difference, the heat naturally “spreads out” into the air around it. As the active ingredients move further into your skin, it’s absorbed into your bloodstream and transported to your brain and throughout your body. Transdermal delivery bypasses your lungs, liver, and stomach (places where the cannabinoid is filtered or broken down). That means you get 100 percent of the medicinal value of the cannabinoids. Studies have shown that transdermal applications of CBD can be effective for reduction in inflammation and pain, but there are a host of applications all related to the cannabinoid profiles.

La Mend, a transdermal patch company out of California uses CBD from industrial hemp for a therapeutic effect with other active ingredients to optimize the power of their promise. They promote that the CBD they use is sourced from the highest quality, organically farmed, non-GMO hemp plants. La Mend has formulated 4 patches with hemp-infused ingredients and 4 plant-based patches formulated without hemp.

The Good Patch has cleverly branded their line of patches for pain, energy, hangovers, period cramps, unwinding, and sleep. Their hangover patch boasts “15 mg of premium hemp extract with B1, B Complex and green tea extract” purported to reduce the effects of a hangover. For their period pain patch, they combine 15 mg of hemp extract with black cohosh and menthol. Black cohosh has long treated hormone-related discomfort including PMS and menopausal changes.

Unlike La Mend, many other patches available in the U.S. are strictly cannabis and differentiate in strain categories like indica and sativa. One of the most well-known brands in the transdermal space is Mary’s Medicinals.

They also offer a patented product for transdermal technology that looks like a marker. In fact, it’s a transdermal gel pen that they say provides one of the fastest onset rates of all available products on the market. The directions are to apply the gel to any veinous area of the skin, like an ankle or a wrist, and the effects will last between 4-6 hours. One of the benefits of this type of targeted applications is that it is very specific in the amount at 2mg per pump, allowing delivery to be accurately dosed with 50 doses per pen.

Having this kind of tight finessing on the dosing allows you to create your own specific cannabinoid ratio in transdermal therapeutics. Mary’s transdermal gel pens are available in 4 cannabinoid profiles: THC-Sativa, THC-Indica, CBN, and CBD. Being able to select a gel based on these profiles allows you to select one for the desired effect.

So what does the future hold for transdermal technologies in Canada? A great deal. With so many licensed producers competing for their share of the market, we’ll be seeing more and more differentiated products with convenient applications in the therapeutic realm. It may take a little time to become as commonplace as they are in the U.S., but they will surely be a more recognized form of delivery once the restrictions on topicals have lifted, which is promised by October 17th, 2019.

Related comments

  • From Janelle Simone

    This is such an interesting way to consume cannabis for therapeutic purposes. Can't wait to see some of these products hit the Canadian market later this year!

  • From BahaqueenM

    Wow, this is cool.

  • From Connor Christine

    So I had the chance to try a CBN patch while I was on vacation, I actually used it on a day where I had a few glasses of wine the night before. I applied it in the morning, and let me tell you.. I had the best poolside afternoon nap that day.

  • From 22

    This can revolutionary if it works as wished... similar to NicoDerm

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